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Olinda

portable raku kiln plans for isofrax fabric

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Olinda    0

I purchased some Isofrax (I may have spelled this wrong!) ceramic refractory fabric, a long sheet of expanded metal and a ward burner system. I have shelves, furniture, propane tank and have made ceramic buttons. What I would like to do is to make a low wooden, wheeled cart and line it with soft brick. That way I could keep it under the covered portion of my back patio and pull it into the uncovered concrete area to fire, thus reducing fire hazards. Ideally, I would also be able to occasionally do some cone 5-6 reduction firings. What I need now is a diagram, plan, advice, etc. When I purchased the fabric and expanded metal, I had plans for a kiln but somehow I've lost the plans. They were great because they were, truly, step by step, plain and simple.

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Mark C.    1,808

I purchased some Isofrax (I may have spelled this wrong!) ceramic refractory fabric, a long sheet of expanded metal and a ward burner system. I have shelves, furniture, propane tank and have made ceramic buttons. What I would like to do is to make a low wooden, wheeled cart and line it with soft brick. That way I could keep it under the covered portion of my back patio and pull it into the uncovered concrete area to fire, thus reducing fire hazards. Ideally, I would also be able to occasionally do some cone 5-6 reduction firings. What I need now is a diagram, plan, advice, etc. When I purchased the fabric and expanded metal, I had plans for a kiln but somehow I've lost the plans. They were great because they were, truly, step by step, plain and simple.

 

I do not know about your lost plans but I would make the cart from metal not wood as thats a fire hazard.

Mark

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Idaho Potter    62

Definitely metal over wood. There are good books on building raku kilns:

RAKU a Practical Approach by Steve Branfman

and Alternative Kilns & Firing Techniques by James C. Watkins & Paul Andrew Wandless.

 

The plans may not be the same as you had originally, but if your expanded metal sheet is flexible and easily cut with metal shears, both books have information that should help you on your way. Both books have plans for top loading kilns, and also for kilns that have to be lifted to access the fired work. If you are planning on firing without assistance, I suggest the top loading models.

 

Shirley

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I had a portable raku kiln on a metal frame with steel base. I welded posts to the frame that I cold slip another

channel iron frame top with pulleys to support the chamber to open the kiln.

It worked great . The one in my gallery shows a kiln with pulleys supported by pulleys on the ceiling in my kiln shed. this kiln is featured in 21st century Kilns by Mel Jacobson.

I use inch thick fiber but I don't expect that to fire very well to cone 6. possibly if the fiber were 2 inches thick but you run the of cooling too quickly.

let us know how this plan develops.

marcia

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Having some problems posting

Here are two photos. One is of a frame using channel iron that fits together and breaks down to be portable. This one was at my studio in Montana The other is the interior of my current raku kiln in Texas.

 

Marcia

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post-1954-135385990059_thumb.jpg

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