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korean celadon

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Hi world,

 

I have recently made large white stoneware vase and I like the korean celadon glaze and inlay tequnique. I read that for high fire reduction the recipie for celadon glaze is like 2 parts red clay and 1 part woodash, but I don't think that's right? dose anyone have a good recipie for celadon?

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks!

Darrel

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That does not look like any Celadon that i ahve seen or used. With Red Clay and Wood ash I suppose it could be a Temmoku or a Shino. I would check the formula very carefully.

 

 

 

I suggest picking up John Britt's book for high fire glazes. It has several celadons as well as other glazes and a bunch of good information.

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Celadons are produced in reduction firing when you have a small percentage of iron oxide in a clear-ish base glaze. Traditional glazes in the orient in general were composed of the ashes of different plants along with clay and ground feldspathic rocks. You'll also find that traditional glazes often were formulated for green glazing (no bisque).

 

I can give you a recipe that uses stuff like rice husk ash, and rice straw ash, washed red pine ash , and so on.... but unless you have access to sources of them (unlikely unless you are in Japan or Korea or maybe China), it will be useless.

 

If you are not planning on green glazing, a good starting point for a very basic celadon is to take any clear glaze recipe, and add about 2% red iron oxide to the batch.

 

The old standby "1-2-3-4 Clear" is a base clear gloss at Orton cone 9-10

 

10 Any Kaolin

20 Whiting

30 Flint

40 Any Feldspar

 

The particualr kaolin and the particular feldspar selected will affect "details" of the melt.

 

 

You should be able to make a celadon glaze out of wood ash, feldspar, and an iron bearing clay. Do a triaxial blend of those three materials and I'd be surprised if you don't get something you might like. Generations of potters sometimes had their whole pallate of glazes based in a single triaxial like that.

 

 

I'd suggest picking up a very basic book on ceramic materials chemistry like "Clay and Glazes For The Potter" by Daniel Rhodes and learning about WHY glazes do what they do based upon the che mistry in the melt and the raw materials sourcing impacts on the melt. It will be far more useful than a compendium of recipes type book in the long run in your developemnt as a ceramist.

 

best,

 

...............john

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Celadons are produced in reduction firing when you have a small percentage of iron oxide in a clear-ish base glaze. Traditional glazes in the orient in general were composed of the ashes of different plants along with clay and ground feldspathic rocks. You'll also find that traditional glazes often were formulated for green glazing (no bisque).

 

I can give you a recipe that uses stuff like rice husk ash, and rice straw ash, washed red pine ash , and so on.... but unless you have access to sources of them (unlikely unless you are in Japan or Korea or maybe China), it will be useless.

 

If you are not planning on green glazing, a good starting point for a very basic celadon is to take any clear glaze recipe, and add about 2% red iron oxide to the batch.

 

The old standby "1-2-3-4 Clear" is a base clear gloss at Orton cone 9-10

 

10 Any Kaolin

20 Whiting

30 Flint

40 Any Feldspar

 

The particualr kaolin and the particular feldspar selected will affect "details" of the melt.

 

 

You should be able to make a celadon glaze out of wood ash, feldspar, and an iron bearing clay. Do a triaxial blend of those three materials and I'd be surprised if you don't get something you might like. Generations of potters sometimes had their whole pallate of glazes based in a single triaxial like that.

 

 

I'd suggest picking up a very basic book on ceramic materials chemistry like "Clay and Glazes For The Potter" by Daniel Rhodes and learning about WHY glazes do what they do based upon the che mistry in the melt and the raw materials sourcing impacts on the melt. It will be far more useful than a compendium of recipes type book in the long run in your developemnt as a ceramist.

 

best,

 

...............john

 

 

 

Well Ihave this super white ash that I got to put in my insence burner and it only says ash on it the rest is in japanese, so this might be like washed pine ash or something like that so I think i'll try this in a glaze.

 

 

Darrel

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Celadon colors can vary widely, from jade green/blue to very gray. Gather up some formulas and start testing. 1-2-3-4 is a great place to start, although it tends to craze, so it'll need some adjustment. Firing schedules will also affect the outcomes quite a bit, so stick with a schedule that is consistent.

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