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laurelneth

using crushed soft brick to fire large tiles on

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post-7925-134894470238_thumb.jpgHi. I am going to fire 2, 12" circular sculpted tiles, and I am hoping not to lose them in the firing process. I had read some time ago about using crushed soft brick on the firing shelf. I decided to crush some soft brick and ended up with a nice but rather course product. I was wondering, how fine should the soft brick be ground down to? I can see that it is possible to get it very fine if I need to. I would say my coursely ground brick had is about 1/8" and finer. If the idea is just to get the tile off the shelf and give it movement as it shrinks, I am thinking the coursely ground brick will be ok. But I have only used alumina silicate in the past and that is extremely fine, so I really don't know. What advice can you give me? Thanks, Laurel <><

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A cushion of ground soft brick or grog would help lift your tiles off the shelf. I'd suggest a layer that lifts the tiles a quarter of an inch. I would think consistency in the size of the particles is more important. I've used coarse grog and it has worked.

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A cushion of ground soft brick or grog would help lift your tiles off the shelf. I'd suggest a layer that lifts the tiles a quarter of an inch. I would think consistency in the size of the particles is more important. I've used coarse grog and it has worked.

 

 

 

Thanks. That was what I was hoping to hear! Laurel <><

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I am sorry that my reply is not what you wanted to hear. My questions, with your answers were intended to show you how you might not need to put anything under the ware at all. But I am glad that you got the answer you wanted. Finis

 

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I am sorry that my reply is not what you wanted to hear. My questions, with your answers were intended to show you how you might not need to put anything under the ware at all. But I am glad that you got the answer you wanted. Finis

 

 

 

Sorry, I didn't understand your connection to my question. I started the round tiles by forming a 1/2" slab. When firm enough I took it to the wheel and cut it to a 12" diameter. When soft leather hard I turned it over and using a 1/4 loop tool, carved out approx. 1/4" circular grooves spaced not quite 1/2 apart until I got to the center. After adding clay and carving I scooped out of the back areas where the added clay was thick. Then, I added holes throughout the backside with a drill bit! Believe me, I did everything I could think of to keep this thing together!!! Unfortunately, I don't have a picture of the back to attach. (I take the pics but my daughter gets them on the computer for me cuz I don't know how). These tiles will be part of a larger community project and from what I understand, they will be attached to the project with wires bent over the raised rim. Laurel <><

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post-7925-134894470238_thumb.jpgHi. I am going to fire 2, 12" circular sculpted tiles, and I am hoping not to lose them in the firing process. I had read some time ago about using crushed soft brick on the firing shelf. I decided to crush some soft brick and ended up with a nice but rather course product. I was wondering, how fine should the soft brick be ground down to? I can see that it is possible to get it very fine if I need to. I would say my coursely ground brick had is about 1/8" and finer. If the idea is just to get the tile off the shelf and give it movement as it shrinks, I am thinking the coursely ground brick will be ok. But I have only used alumina silicate in the past and that is extremely fine, so I really don't know. What advice can you give me? Thanks, Laurel <><

 

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