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firing a ^6 glaze to ^10


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#1 Darcy Kane

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 08:24 PM

I was chatting with a potter friend today and mentioned that I was looking for a glaze to use on the rims of some pieces that would run. Her suggestion was to use a ^6 glaze over the ^10 glazes I already use, just on the very top rim and fire to ^10. She thought the ^6 glaze would run in drips. Anyone tried this? Pictures? Horror stories?

#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 10:55 AM

It's an idea worth trying with a few glazes on some test tiles. I imagine it will all depend on which glazes work reliably together. You can also get recipes that run at any temp.

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#3 JLowes

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Posted 11 June 2012 - 12:37 PM

Hi Darsi,

I attended a workshop with potter Fong Choo. If you look up his work (www.fongchoo.com) (also Google fong choo in the Images tab), you will see that there are running/blending glazes on his work. One of the ways he encourages the runs and blends is by layering Cone 06-04 glazes over Cone 6 glazes. I have tried some of his combinations and found the negatives to be blisters at times, as a function I think of too thick application, but overall the effects obtained are worth the experimentation and attention to detail while glazing required. Although this isn't in the range you work, it does give you something to look at.

Since Cone 6 and Cone 10 are considerably closer in temperature, you will have to experiment some with test tiles to get a repeatable result and understanding of the interactions. Since Cone 6 glaze melts using much the same materials as Cone 10 glazes, the melt is encouraged by differing levels of fluxing ingredients and how much are present. You might be able to adjust a glaze you already use to achieve a different melt and run.

John

#4 Darcy Kane

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 09:11 PM

Hi Darsi,

I attended a workshop with potter Fong Choo. If you look up his work (www.fongchoo.com) (also Google fong choo in the Images tab), you will see that there are running/blending glazes on his work. One of the ways he encourages the runs and blends is by layering Cone 06-04 glazes over Cone 6 glazes. I have tried some of his combinations and found the negatives to be blisters at times, as a function I think of too thick application, but overall the effects obtained are worth the experimentation and attention to detail while glazing required. Although this isn't in the range you work, it does give you something to look at.

Since Cone 6 and Cone 10 are considerably closer in temperature, you will have to experiment some with test tiles to get a repeatable result and understanding of the interactions. Since Cone 6 glaze melts using much the same materials as Cone 10 glazes, the melt is encouraged by differing levels of fluxing ingredients and how much are present. You might be able to adjust a glaze you already use to achieve a different melt and run.

John


Thank you for your input John and Chris. I think I will do some careful test tiles to see what I get. I'm also going to try dipping rims in ash.







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