Jump to content


Photo

Just Sharing the Blues


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Lucille Oka

Lucille Oka

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 756 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 16 January 2012 - 01:01 AM

The Iznik Blues. These are a few of the beautiful Iznik pots. I never tire of looking at them.

Attached Files


John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#2 Frederik-W

Frederik-W

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 292 posts
  • Locationa distant moon of Uranus

Posted 16 January 2012 - 02:07 AM

The mathematical precision of the pattern on the plate amazes me,
how on earth did they manage to fit that pattern with such precision ?

Very beautiful.

#3 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,888 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 16 January 2012 - 07:13 AM

Algebra was invented in the middle east and used for pattern designs among other things. In my lecture at NCECA in 2007 I used algebraic illustrations of how patterns were developed..even the beautiful flowing ones on Lucille's images.

Marcia

#4 Kabe

Kabe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 132 posts
  • LocationMo.

Posted 16 January 2012 - 11:18 AM

Algebra. It is amazing to me how much science is a part of ceramics. I was a science major who transfered over to art after I kind of fell in the mud and couldn't get out. Glazing is all chemistry and the reaction of its ingredient to fire. The explanation of it is in the math. Patterns work out of geometry and degress of a circle. The relationship between a lid and the pot is a mathmatical balance. Where the handle hangs on the side as far as funtion goes, is physics. I thought it was funny that the Art dept always referred to the science building as the Twilight Zone. It is as if the science dept configured the math and the art people applied it. ain't clay fun, kabe Beautiful blues. Pardon my lack of Art History but were these hand painted or was it after they sort of got a handle on those early transfer decal process? What time period are these from? One more note, I will really feel dumb if they are yours. If that is the case, a big sorry.

#5 Lucille Oka

Lucille Oka

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 756 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 16 January 2012 - 04:05 PM

No they are not mine. I do not own them nor did I make them. I just like them. They are from Iznik in Turkey. The plate is 15th century and the Ewer is 16th Century both currently in the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

They are hand painted and you can tell by close scrutiny of the design elements. However there may have been a pounced stencil employed on the plate for the basic shapes.

The vessels are marvelous works that require lots of patience to execute. These are imitative responses to the Chinese import porcelains.


John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#6 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,170 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 16 January 2012 - 06:47 PM

Our local art museum had a display of Turkish pottery and for the opening they had several of these artists hand painting the work. It was amazing to watch them lay on these patterns free style ... You had to be an artist to appreciate how hard that is! Their brush was very thick but trimmed down to just one or two long hairs ... That way they could load the base with a lot of color and keep drawing for a long time without stopping. They get to be known as great artists by perfectly copying the Masters ... Only then are they allowed to do something original.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#7 Amy Waller

Amy Waller

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts
  • LocationBakersville, NC

Posted 20 January 2012 - 02:48 PM

Love these! Thanks for sharing, Lucille.

The Freer Sackler has some nice Iznik pottery - you can see some online here (just search for "Iznik" in the search box).

#8 confused_yet_curious

confused_yet_curious

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
  • LocationPhiladelphia

Posted 14 February 2012 - 11:41 PM

Hey, do any of you know of any good glazes recipes for the Iznik glaze?

#9 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,888 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 15 February 2012 - 03:37 AM

Istanbul has beautiful isnik tiles in many of the mosques and Hagia Sophia. Topkopki museum is a treasure too.
Marcia




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users