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meisie

pod questions

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I have a niece that is getting married in June. Years ago my Aunt made ceramic doves for the center pieces of mine and my sisters wedding tables. I wanted to make some for my nieces wedding. Two for each table. These doves are made of pinch pot halves put together and then wings and beaks. I put two holes in each that double as eyes and a place for the air to escape when I fire. They all have flat bottoms and are completely enclosed. I was wondering if I would ensure success a bit more if I carved out the bottom so they had a hole there as well. I have only done one pod style piece before and that was in a class. Any suggestions anyone could help me with? I'm worried I may have forgotten since my class was last year.

Thanks so much

Renee

 

 

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The two eye holes will be enough as long as the birds are 100%' ... No doubts ...dry.

Put them up to your face and if they feel cool they are not dry.

Another cute touch is to put dry clay pieces inside ... Shake to keep them loose and after firing you have a rattle.

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oh I like the rattle idea!!! I have learned my lesson on the absolutely dry part. So I want them made so they can sit a month or so before I fire. Thanks!

 

 

The two eye holes will be enough as long as the birds are 100%' ... No doubts ...dry.

Put them up to your face and if they feel cool they are not dry.

Another cute touch is to put dry clay pieces inside ... Shake to keep them loose and after firing you have a rattle.

 

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oh I like the rattle idea!!! I have learned my lesson on the absolutely dry part. So I want them made so they can sit a month or so before I fire. Thanks!

 

 

The two eye holes will be enough as long as the birds are 100%' ... No doubts ...dry.

Put them up to your face and if they feel cool they are not dry.

Another cute touch is to put dry clay pieces inside ... Shake to keep them loose and after firing you have a rattle.

 

 

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Don't worry about air holes. The eye holes are more than enough. You can fire pieces that are completely sealed. We do it all the time at my shop. Expanding air does not blow up pots. Air bubbles do no blow up pots. Steam blows up pots. You just have to make sure the pieces are completely dry, which means letting them dry much longer than normal. Because they are sealed up, they can appear dry on the outside while still being wet on the inside. It's not a bad idea to do a preheat in the kiln.

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Don't worry about air holes. The eye holes are more than enough. You can fire pieces that are completely sealed. We do it all the time at my shop. Expanding air does not blow up pots. Air bubbles do no blow up pots. Steam blows up pots. You just have to make sure the pieces are completely dry, which means letting them dry much longer than normal. Because they are sealed up, they can appear dry on the outside while still being wet on the inside. It's not a bad idea to do a preheat in the kiln.

 

 

Thanks, Neilestrick, for posting that. It is amazing how many experienced potters still think that air pockets and trapped air blow pots up!

 

Jim

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Interesting. I did have one firing where I lost quite a few pot largely due to each having a heavy base and not being dry enough. I won't make that mistake again. regardless I think with these I am going to do a preheat because you're right it's hard to tell how dry they are going to be on the inside.

 

Don't worry about air holes. The eye holes are more than enough. You can fire pieces that are completely sealed. We do it all the time at my shop. Expanding air does not blow up pots. Air bubbles do no blow up pots. Steam blows up pots. You just have to make sure the pieces are completely dry, which means letting them dry much longer than normal. Because they are sealed up, they can appear dry on the outside while still being wet on the inside. It's not a bad idea to do a preheat in the kiln.

 

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