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How Clay Has Shaped You?


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#21 Mark C.

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 01:05 AM

How has clay shaped me-hum

lets see its tweaked my back more than once

wore out 3 of my wrist bones (had them removed) on right wrist

hurt my feet-given me  bad hand and finger cramps

burnt my hands  around kilns a few times really bad.

Given me a lop sided strong back muscle on one side

ruined more shoes than I can count-killed a few washing machines which hurts me too move them.

I feel a bit worn out the way clay has shaped me and its still not done doing a number on me.


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Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#22 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 05:50 AM

Gee Mark,
I thought it was meant in a more esoteric way. Sorry to hear of all your aches and pains. Pottery is a brutal profession on the body.
Marcia
Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
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#23 Mark C.

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 10:41 PM

I have been down to working with 10 tons a year now the past 5-10 years-this coming year it may be less.It used to be more.

I move that clay into shed then I have to move it about 10-12 times more before its sold. That means moving it to wheel and to trimming and to drying and to bisque-you see there is about 12 moves before it sold. 40 plus years working with this kind of weight will take its toll on you. Same deal with brick layer or concrete worker. If it where a hobby it would be such a small amount it would have no effect but for me its kept me in shape and also hurt me-Thats the life of a full time potter .


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#24 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:55 PM

when I was teaching and bricking up doors with hard bricks 4 xs /week, 125 x 5lbs/brick aquas 5000 pounds of bricks per week not to mention the kiln shelves and pots. I got a ganglia cyst and then bilateral carpal tunnel so bad I couldn't hold a glass of water. That was 1980.So even teaching pottery is hard on the ol bod.When we moved in 1980, I built new kilns with a hinged door and a roll- in cart car kiln..

Marcia
Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
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#25 glazenerd

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 06:35 AM

After reading these two posts: perhaps I will just stick with experimentation and research. After 44 years of construction, all I really want to lift is my 44 oz. coffee mug.



#26 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 08:24 AM

Did something to my wrist when we put the lid back on my big oval kiln. I could still feel it while throwing yesterday. Take care of your most expensive piece of equipment, your body. You can't get far without it.
Marcia
Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
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#27 Diesel Clay

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 10:49 AM

if we're talking physical changes:
When firing a raku kiln in high school, I managed to singe off a small section of hair that got out of my bandanna back to the roots. I have a small cowlick on the left side of my forehead now because of that.




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