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rope coil pottery


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#1 Mudlark

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 03:53 AM

Has anyone experience with or knowledge of the rope coil method of making large pots.It was developed around 1920 by a Frenchman
Rene Auge-Laribe. His family still operate a pottery but do not give much away about the technique on their web page. This might sound stupid, but I can claim having a seniors moment, I have almost built what I think is the machine involved having seen a photograph in a book called "The French Country Table Pottery and Faience of Provence". However I am in a quandry when it comes to how the clay is applied. Is it by lumps, coils or some other method.

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#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 10:19 AM

Sounds interesting ... If its called the rope coil method, wouldn't that imply it is built with long ropes of clay in a coil method? I have seen potters work with long coils slung around their necks that they keep feeding onto the pot as they turn it on a turn table. They thumb smooth/connect the inside surface first then thumb the outside in the opposite direction.

How does their method look different?

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#3 bciskepottery

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 10:53 AM

This is the last business in Alpes-Maritimes using the local clay as a raw material. The porosity of the vases made from the clay found in Biot offer optimal conditions for plant growing while being very resistant to frost.
1920: René’s grandfather creates the Poterie Provençale.
1925: The trademark is registered
1930: New workshops are established (where the fabrication unit is now).
1981: René AUGE LARIBE takes over the family business.
2006: The company is officially awarded the “Entreprise du Patrimoine Vivant”(Living Heritage Entreprise) certification.

Manufacturing techniques: Throws by using a rope wheel, a very specific technique designed to produce very big items. This method was developed by his grandfather in 1920. For many years, Rene has done his best to share and transmit this rare and peculiar knowledge. Today, the rope wheel technique in starting to be recognized and used by other potters settled in France but also abroad (including in Baton Rouge, Louisiana).

from http://www.artisanda...potprov_am.html

#4 Mudlark

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 03:40 PM

Sounds interesting ... If its called the rope coil method, wouldn't that imply it is built with long ropes of clay in a coil method? I have seen potters work with long coils slung around their necks that they keep feeding onto the pot as they turn it on a turn table. They thumb smooth/connect the inside surface first then thumb the outside in the opposite direction.

How does their method look different?



#5 Mudlark

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 04:12 PM

This technique involves a hemp rope wound around a wooden form, the clay is applied to the outside face of the rope and is shaped with a profile similar to the jigger and jolley process but on a much larger scale. The wooden form and rope are mounted on a vertical axle so that they can be turned against the profile thereby shaping the outside of the pot. Once the pot has been "built" the rope is removed to facilitate drying. Long coils of clay are the obvious solution but given the ingenuity displayed by the inventor I wonder if he also came up with a different, more efficient, way of applying the clay.

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#6 Mudlark

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 04:15 PM

This is the last business in Alpes-Maritimes using the local clay as a raw material. The porosity of the vases made from the clay found in Biot offer optimal conditions for plant growing while being very resistant to frost.
1920: René’s grandfather creates the Poterie Provençale.
1925: The trademark is registered
1930: New workshops are established (where the fabrication unit is now).
1981: René AUGE LARIBE takes over the family business.
2006: The company is officially awarded the “Entreprise du Patrimoine Vivant”(Living Heritage Entreprise) certification.

Manufacturing techniques: Throws by using a rope wheel, a very specific technique designed to produce very big items. This method was developed by his grandfather in 1920. For many years, Rene has done his best to share and transmit this rare and peculiar knowledge. Today, the rope wheel technique in starting to be recognized and used by other potters settled in France but also abroad (including in Baton Rouge, Louisiana).

from http://www.artisanda...potprov_am.html



#7 Mudlark

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 04:31 PM

If you open the following www.poterie-provencale.com you will get the familys' web page which opens with an intriging micro second flash of the process in operation. But it is of so short duration that it is immpossible to see any detail. I've tried searching for greater detail but to no avail. The Louisiana link is interesting but I have not been able to find anything about it. It looks like I'm in for a period of trial and error.

#8 bciskepottery

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 10:07 PM

If you open the following www.poterie-provencale.com you will get the familys' web page which opens with an intriging micro second flash of the process in operation. But it is of so short duration that it is immpossible to see any detail. I've tried searching for greater detail but to no avail. The Louisiana link is interesting but I have not been able to find anything about it. It looks like I'm in for a period of trial and error.



This might be helpful: Click on the pictures to see the rope being applied to a wood frame and clay on the rope.

#9 Mudlark

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Posted 16 December 2011 - 09:17 PM

Has anyone experience with or knowledge of the rope coil method of making large pots.It was developed around 1920 by a Frenchman
Rene Auge-Laribe. His family still operate a pottery but do not give much away about the technique on their web page. This might sound stupid, but I can claim having a seniors moment, I have almost built what I think is the machine involved having seen a photograph in a book called "The French Country Table Pottery and Faience of Provence". However I am in a quandry when it comes to how the clay is applied. Is it by lumps, coils or some other method.

Mudlark


I have found the answer or at least the current method of applying the clay.It could not be simpler, it is is just daubded onto the rope and turned against the profile. With a little ingenuity a coil extruder could be added to the machine so that the process is a little less labour intensive. Back to the drawing board !

Thanks for the links "bciskepottery" they led to a satisfactory result.

Mudlark

#10 PeterH

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 03:50 PM

Has anyone experience with or knowledge of the rope coil method of making large pots.It was developed around 1920 by a Frenchman
Rene Auge-Laribe. His family still operate a pottery but do not give much away about the technique on their web page. This might sound stupid, but I can claim having a seniors moment, I have almost built what I think is the machine involved having seen a photograph in a book called "The French Country Table Pottery and Faience of Provence". However I am in a quandry when it comes to how the clay is applied. Is it by lumps, coils or some other method.

Mudlark


There are three enlargeable pictures and a little text at:
http://www.terre-en-...voir_faire.html

It's not obvious to me how thick the rope covering needs to be to permit the
removal of the boards described as "like orange slices".

Regards, Peter

#11 weeble

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 12:10 AM

AHHh, check out the third picture in 'drying' and the last 3 picture in 'shaping.' It certainly looks like they're using the disks like barrel ends, then the tall skinny pieces are the barrel staves but with spaces in between. The layer of rope is wound around, clay slathered on, then the 'calibre' knocks off the excess. The center disk is removed, the stave pieces are pulled inward, leaving the rope stuck to the inside of the pot. Pull the rope out, smooth, and let it dry! Rope only needs to be one layer thick, solid up the sides. You could use something like a fabric bag or sack too, anything flexible enough to be removed once the inside support is removed.
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#12 PeterH

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 07:48 AM

AHHh, check out the third picture in 'drying' and the last 3 picture in 'shaping.' It certainly looks like they're using the disks like barrel ends, then the tall skinny pieces are the barrel staves but with spaces in between. The layer of rope is wound around, clay slathered on, then the 'calibre' knocks off the excess. The center disk is removed, the stave pieces are pulled inward, leaving the rope stuck to the inside of the pot. Pull the rope out, smooth, and let it dry! Rope only needs to be one layer thick, solid up the sides. You could use something like a fabric bag or sack too, anything flexible enough to be removed once the inside support is removed.


Right, got it!

I'd missed the 3rd 'drying' picture and and was still thinking in terms of the 'segments of an orange' they mentioned, rather than barrel staves.

Presumably getting the bottom disk out of the neck hole remains an issue. Unless they add the base later.

Regards, Peter




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