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coloured slips


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#1 MartinSycholt

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 10:59 AM

Hi
Im new to pottery but have taken to using oxide slips and then glaze either with white or clear glazes. The slips I currently use include bronze (manganese oxide, cobalt and iron oxide), blue (cobalt with manganese oxide), green (copper carbonate and oxide), red (iron oxide). I am now wondering how to get turqoise, mustard/yellow and other colours. Are other colours possible with basic and inexpensive ingredients?
Thanks
Martin

#2 Bobg

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 04:08 PM

Hi Martin,

I'm waiting to what others have to say, because I'm interested in knowing also. I currently use cabalt for blue, iron oxide for browns and reds, and chrome oxide for green.

Bob

#3 bciskepottery

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 06:27 PM

A good source is Robin Hopper's Making Marks and/or The Ceramic Spectrum. He has chapters in each book devoted to stains/colors and how to achieve them. Sometimes his charts are printed in the annual Ceramics Art sourcebook available as a download on CAD. I've found the info on stains/oxides/washes on Vince Pitelka's webiste to be very helpful and use those in my classes. You can also google Cynthia Bringle to get recipes of her stains/washes. Finallyet, you can do line blends to develop your own palettes and colors.

#4 MartinSycholt

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 03:54 PM

thanks ill try these - martin

#5 Red Rocks

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 01:45 AM

Another thing you should experiment with slips is a little out of the box. Cover the entire inside of the bowl, plate, platter with the slip and then glaze it with a glaze you wouldn't normally think a slip would come thru, like a green slip under a copper red. You can create a whole new palate of amazing glazes using this technique. Obviously test on small pieces first.




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