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jafa5

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About jafa5

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 04/19/1971

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Matakana, New Zealand
  • Interests
    Fermenting, brewing, distilling and curing meat

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159 profile views
  1. Cheers guys I'd love to try wood fired but only have access to gas or electric kiln options for now. This will be fired in one of the gas kilns to ^6 and oxidation. Firing with a mate for this one and that's how he wants to fire. Slow cool down, he is firing tenmoku and tea dust types so I might match that and run with oxides for the high textured pots and tea dust tenmoku for the rest. I've only made my own glazes to date, as I have a lot of glaze materials that came free with my first kiln, so seemed a good way to go. Unfortunately I have very limited experience but learning every day and every firing this is my second batch of textured pots, the first I used a tenmoku but it covered a lot of the texture and was a little under fired. They are going back into this firing and hoping for a better result. I've made up a few textured tiles Magnolia and will look to test those, they look very interesting. Might start raiding the kitchen cupboards to find some more haha. This morning I made up a semi matte Pres and will try that on a textured tile. It's from John Britts mid range glazes and can be used as a base for tea dust and iron oxide speckles so I should be able to get a few tests out of it. Pretta I'll check out Sunshine Cobb (thank you) and i'm going with the oxides for the textured pots, simple white glaze inside or a speckle tenmoku. Seemingly quite a few use oxide washes under and over tenmoku glazes so seems like a good match for me with my mates firing next weekend. I've made up 6 washes to test including a rutile and copper. Yes Lee I like leaving the raw clay out too, especially red and buff clays, makes for a great feel in your hand. Thanks guys! I'll post the finished item if it doesn't explode.
  2. Hey guys, More of an aesthetic question really but I was after some direction on the best glazes for highly textured pots. I've made a few bowls like chawan but about 150mm across at bisque - see attached image. I was looking to use a tenmoku or similar but think it's going to fill in all the lovely textured surface. So have made up a few iron washes and iron saturates (firing to cone 6) but was wondering if peo pl e had ideas for other sorts of glazes that would also suit a rough textured pot? Cheers, Liam
  3. Awesome thanks Min!
  4. My partner (Becs) is keen to start making some slipware so I am going to prep some clay and slip for her and just thought I'd ask what people are using for the clay bodies, slips and top glazes. Also I wanted to ask what other people do in regards to process, applying slip on wet, leather or biscuitware for instance. Any pros and cons would be appreciated. We've been looking at some traditional English and Korean pottery and love it's rustic qualities and contrasting colours. I have a bucket of terracotta slaked down (dug out from my work and fires a lovely red) and was going to make a simple white slip recipe for low fire . I think these are the common body and slip types, all low fire. I'd be really keen to play with slip recipes and wanted to ask if there would be issues if I were to incorporate oxides or stains into the slip? Or is that something weI should leave for the glaze? Is there much difference between applying the slip on a wet body, leather, dry or biscuit? Also if there is any benefits if it's applied by brush or dipped? Too thick, too thin... Endless list of questions until we start testing and finding out haha. It seems to me that these could quite easily be made with a single firing. Anyone tried this? We also have some stoneware buff and I was wondering if you can create slipware using a stoneware body and fire to cone 6 or higher? Is this likely to work? I'm not sure what the interaction of the clay body and slip would like at higher temperatures. Cheers, Liam
  5. jafa5

    Making ash

    I made my first small batches this week and yes only small amounts but will add up. The pan didn't like it Curt Hopefully mine isn'the high in colloidal Silica Fred, but to be fair i'm not sure if i'do know what would happen with that. Glass former that very runny? Lots of small batches to find a good one is a great way to start. I used a volcanic as this week that we found on my building site which turned out really nice, i'llc photograph and post. Thanks for all the input guys, really appreciated. Liam
  6. jafa5

    Making ash

    Thanks Fred! I hadn't considered putting them in the gas kiln but not sure it has enough volume. I'll do it in the fireplace as you suggest and dry it first. A bit of fun if nothing else
  7. jafa5

    Making ash

    I'm collecting a number of materials to render down to ash after reading some of the feedback on ash glaze posts, most memorable is a comment from Oldlady about a potter collecting ash from specific trees and each one being different. Anyway, l've started collecting a few items from the garden including maple seed pods and the seed tops from Vietnamese mint. The quandary is how to burn them green and collect the ash. Initially I thought i'd just light them in a cleaned fire place but i'd need to use paper or some other ignition source to get it started which would contaminate the ash. So now i'm thinking i'll use the gas burner from one of the kilns or brewery and fire them in a cast iron pot. How have other people done this? Also is it any different to make ash from green vegetation compared to dried vegetation? Cheers, Liam
  8. jafa5

    Raw ash onto wet clay

    Thanks guys, I found some nice looking feldspar recipes today and will try some substitutes tonight, hopefully fire them this weekend. I'll check out BjarnI thanks Tyler
  9. jafa5

    Raw ash onto wet clay

    Thanks Oldlady:) I'll just give it a try!
  10. I've been really fortunate at work to come across a heap of local material, one of the most exciting is a small seam of volcanic ash from Lake TaupeTaupe here in New Zealand, that erupted about 18,000 years ago. I've used a small amount in a few small batches which has been really good but wanted to ask if it's likely to work as a glaze if I just sprinkle the ash direct onto the wet clay? Today I made a couple of rough textured chawan bowls and I thought they might be worth trying for a single firing with the ash just thrown onto the wet clay. Or am I better to biscuit them, add a glaze and throw some ash onto the wet glaze? Any tips from frequent ash users? Novice here, so please excuse any ludicrously silly questions above Cheers , Liam
  11. jafa5

    Lithium replacement

    Very informative discussion thanks guys, seems the glaze i'm using is pretty good and my general concerns are minimal which is great! Time for some glazing!
  12. jafa5

    Lithium replacement

    Thanks Douglas, point noted and copper is in
  13. jafa5

    Lithium replacement

    Beauty thanks Min You're a star!
  14. jafa5

    Lithium replacement

    Thanks Min I have a couple of gas kilns and can go higher but starting with low fire and working my way up. Quite fortunate to be working on a construction site for a motorway and getting access to a heap of raw materials from volcanic ash, basalt, feldspar and other rock types, most of which are going to be high fire and no doubt i'lvl have a heap of questions when I get started on that in July. Thanks for checking the recipe and nice to know it's balanced for cone 04 to 06. I started to look at Insight and it's going to take some time to learn that but a great looking tool. Longer time to understand all the materials and effects of course, few years to get the basics I think. Do you think the lithium would pose any issues for food safety? I'd really like to use it on the inside of some of my cup forms.
  15. jafa5

    Lithium replacement

    Thanks Min that's really helpful, might take me a few reads to soak it all in but some very clear points thank you. I'll Firing for this is cone 04 to 06 if that makes a difference. I'll load Insight and have a play with this recipe and look to increase the Silica and alumina while reducing boron and removing lithium altogether. That'll be a fun excercise
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