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PatIsGone

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About PatIsGone

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  1. Mehmet, if I had $1000 and wanted a kiln, I would do something like Boris is suggesting. You can always change later, but this will definitely get you going - and maybe for less than $1000 if you find good deals on used equipment.
  2. Hi Mehmet. Welcome. Bad English? Not at all. You should hear some of the people from here in Kentucky, USA! They were born here and my wife still can't understand them! She says they talk like they have a mouth full of marbles. I started a kiln build in October 2018 and am almost done. I have posted my progress in this thread - many of the questions asked me by the members here while I was building would be appropriate to ask yourself and answer here to give everyone a better idea how to help. We will definitely need more info and details first. 1 cubic meter - check gas - check downdraft - check What else? What kind of kiln material are you working with/have access to? Low pressure gas or high pressure bottled propane? Inside a building or outside? Personal or commercial? What size kiln shelves are accessible to you - because you will need to build around them (You taught me well Mark C!). Looking forward to more info from you and watching your progress if you do decide to build rather than buy? (Why not just buy a kiln instead of building one? My answer was a mixture of financial and a DIY personality.) Pat
  3. Holy smokes! I'm in the wrong dang business! If I ever want to become an electrician, I'm moving there! Sorry I'm not in your neck of the woods, or else I'd try to help.
  4. Might keep an eye on govdeals.com - a government (think public schools - art departments) auction site. I just snagged 2 Klopfenstein treadle wheels and a spray booth/cabinet for $150 yesterday. You have to look regularly every 2 weeks or so.
  5. J.T. Abernathy in MI had burners half way up the kiln also. His theory was put the heat where you need it. Supposedly a 30% decrease in fuel usage as opposed to similar kiln - actually as compared to Marc Ward's numbers. Would be interesting to see one with and one without and see the difference. Hmmm. I feel an empirical data collection moment coming on... If you added a burner up half way up, theoretically it would only have to increase the cost of firing by the additional electricity to run the blower. Making an additional burner would be in initial outlay, but if it cut costs, just a matter of time for break-even and then savings. ... Just brainstorming for ya.
  6. If it were me, I would take the 12" WC regulator off and leave it off and replace the one at the tank with an adjustable high pressure regulator. You're firing manual anyway, so it's not like you won't be watching it. Talk about being able to fine tune your pressure and your air flaps... it'll be a whole different level of control. I think you'd appreciate it. BUT (and it's a big but!) the quicker you let the fuel out, the quicker a tank will freeze up. Ergo, on you next firing, have a 20 pound tank on hand. If you do an Amazon search for "adjustable high pressure regulator propane", you'll get a good idea of what you're looking for. Also - was thinking of this today at work - regulators can freeze up also. Does either of your regulators get icy? Not just cold with condensation, but icy? That can also put a kink in the works. EDIT: If the 5 pound is adjustable, just take the 12" WC one off and see what you can do. No purchase necessary.
  7. Linda, just as a point of reference, according to Ward Burners Kiln Cubic Feet and BTUs, if your kiln has 9" of insulating brick (the soft brick), you need approximately 10,000 btu per cubic foot of kiln space per hour. You have an 8 cubic foot kiln. That's approximately 80,000 btus per hour to hit cone 6 (APPROXIMATELY). I haven't checked the orifice size chart, but here it is for your reference. At 11" WC (I know you have 12" so 11" should be fine), you would need an orifice size of at least 7/64" (for only one burner!) to put out that many btus at that pressure(11" WC). ... That is unless you increase the pressure (which was why I brought up adjustable high pressure regulators in previous post). More pressure = more fuel = more btu/hour through same orifice. Don't go voiding warranties or blowing stuff up though! Make sense?
  8. Also, not sure how comfortable you are in messing with the regulators (or replacing them with adjustable high pressure regulators), but a 100 pound propane tank has anywhere between 100 and 200 psi, depending on ambient temps, so you have lots of room here to see if you can get something that works better for you.
  9. OK. Quick check to see if it's a tank freezing issue. Take a 20 pound propane tank - the kind you use on a gas grill (borrow one from a friend if need be). A 100 pound tank should have the same valve as a 20 pound tank. Fire your kiln with the 100 pound tank until it stalls. As soon as it stalls, turn the gas valves off, swap to the 20 pound propane tank, and turn the gas back on. (No worries about pressure differences in a 20 and 100 pound tank. Propane makes it's own pressure by boiling at -43 degrees Fahrenheit.) The kiln will be hot enough that it will re-ignite the propane as soon as it enters the kiln. Propane ignites between 920 and 1020 degrees Fahrenheit (Some will say "unsafe" - do what you feel safe with.) Try to finish out the firing. You should only lose a few hundred degrees in all this swaparoo. I've shut down the kiln, drove to the store to swap out a 20 pound tank, came back home, hooked it all back up, and only lost about 300 degrees. If it is a freezing issue, this will let you know for sure.
  10. Do you have a pressure gauge on your line between the tanks and the burner? I'll bet your tanks are freezing up and the pressure is dropping ( = less fuel = decreasing temps). If you have multiple tanks daisy-chained together, don't run them all at the same time. As one starts to freeze up, turn it off and the other on. I've babied firings this way, shutting one off and the other on as they freeze and thaw. If you only have one tank, a second one would be a possible fix. If it is a air flow problem, take a air hose (hair dryer?) and shoot fresh air in next to burner. You should see temp increase. If you don't, you're burning all the fuel you put in, and you need more fuel - thus, your pressure may be dropping when the propane is too cold to boil (vaporize) in the volume you need it to. Make sense?
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