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mnnaj

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  1. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Mullins Pottery in Quartz powder to protect kiln shelves?   
    How do they plan on keeping the loose powder from the inside of pots?  Personally, I wouldn't want a pot I worked hard over to have schmutz (crap) or powder blown or dripped into it.  If it won't melt on the kiln shelf, it will leave marks in my pots - the bowl or plate will not have a usable surface.  Ish.
    Nancy
  2. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from JohnnyK in New Potter   
    Take classes.  The dream of being a potter or playing with clay maybe upset by the reality of things you can't control, like back pain, allergies to dust, always having rough dry hands.   Your instructor will be able to give advice on how to do things easier - things that might take you months or years to discover on your own.  I also find that the  interaction with other students improves me and changes my work.  Seeing things online are ok, but being able see it done, walk around the demo, look at it from another angle, touch the clay at each stage, that is worth much, much more. 
    Nancy
     by the way I started classes at age 50.
  3. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Mullins Pottery in Quartz powder to protect kiln shelves?   
    How do they plan on keeping the loose powder from the inside of pots?  Personally, I wouldn't want a pot I worked hard over to have schmutz (crap) or powder blown or dripped into it.  If it won't melt on the kiln shelf, it will leave marks in my pots - the bowl or plate will not have a usable surface.  Ish.
    Nancy
  4. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from JohnnyK in New Potter   
    Take classes.  The dream of being a potter or playing with clay maybe upset by the reality of things you can't control, like back pain, allergies to dust, always having rough dry hands.   Your instructor will be able to give advice on how to do things easier - things that might take you months or years to discover on your own.  I also find that the  interaction with other students improves me and changes my work.  Seeing things online are ok, but being able see it done, walk around the demo, look at it from another angle, touch the clay at each stage, that is worth much, much more. 
    Nancy
     by the way I started classes at age 50.
  5. Like
    mnnaj reacted to D.M.Ernst in Pregnancy and Clay Class   
    I took pottery classes on kick wheels during two of my pregnancies and all went well.   My adult children are doing just fine.  General safety  guidelines should be sufficient.  D
  6. Like
    mnnaj reacted to glazenerd in Qotw: Is It Craft Or Is It Art   
    The skill sets, the tools, the equipment, the kilns; along with the clay and glaze all fall into the category of craft. Those everyday functional mugs, plates, and bowls fall into the craft category as well. However, there is a point where creativity extends into craft and the pieces produced are works of art. Craft is what I drink coffee out of every morning, art is hung up on my walls. Art pulls you into the work visually and emotionally.  I would pay $30 for a well crafted mug to drink from, but I would also pay $150 for a mug that stirred my soul to look at.
     
    Nerd
  7. Like
    mnnaj reacted to Pugaboo in My Newest Jewelry Pieces   
    Hi all! Just wanted to share my newest design line of jewelry. I'm really excited about this addition to me repetroi. I also posted a couple photos in my gallery and will try to add more as I can. These are high end pieces using silver plated wire, semi precious stones, and crystals as well as glass and metal beads.
     
    That said the most important part are the focal beads! I made them myself (of course!). I had to learn a whole new technique for getting the holes into these beads as they run differently than my usual beads and pendants. The largest are a little over an inch wide and the hole runs from side to side rather than front to back. That is a long hole to get clear of glaze let me tell you! There are 3 different sized leaf beads that I made in this piece the smallest only about 1/2 of an inch and the largest dangle bead on the necklace over an inch.
     
    I hope you like them and hope a little hope for me since I used them in our art centers yearly competition.
     
    Terry


  8. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Evelyne Schoenmann in Qotw: What Other Things Beside Clay Have You Mastered?   
    I am learning to weave.  I've been quilting for 50 years, knitting & crocheting.  Love the fiber arts.
    Nancy J
  9. Like
    mnnaj reacted to jrgpots in Best Way To Add A Bottom Base To A Slip Cast Object?   
    I had the base of a few chess pieces break after pouring. I set some of the slip on a plasterboard to thicken. I made a new base from the "slip clay" that had thickened. I put the base and the chess piece in a damp box for a week so the moisture content of the 2 pieces were the same. I then used slip to bond them together. It worked for me.
     
    You could do the same. But make sure both pieces have same moisture content as you glue them together or they will crack. The damp box is a great tool for this.
     
    Jed
  10. Like
    mnnaj reacted to Celia UK in Can This Piece Be Salvaged?   
    For those of us this side of the pond can someone explain what Caro syrup or sugar syrup is?
     
    I've used vinegar slip on greenware with mixed success, perhaps syrup will make all the difference?
     
    On the other hand I've had good results with Mayco's clay mender on bisque and even glazed pieces, where very small (3mm broken surface) pieces have been knocked off. See pic. (these bowls are generally 5-6" diameter). Takes a lot of patience and a delicate touch, but so does the initial making, so I've deemed it worth the investment - time & emotional!
     
    I have learnt to only work on these pieces when I can give them my full concentration - the slightest carelessness will see a piece of the 'stencil' on the work table. I have to tell myself when to stop clean up at the greenware stage - and leave it until it's bisqued. Also, I now sandwich the v thin slab for cutting the stencil, between cling film throughout the whole procedure, including drying.

  11. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Sillyhav15 in Removing Greenware From Ceramic Mold Questions   
    I've made vases about 18" and 14" tall, not cone shaped though.  
    Sometimes as you pour the excess slip out it will 'glug' causing the soft slip to pull away from inside the mold.  Be very careful and slow as you do the pouring.  
    Experience will show you how long to let the slip stay in the mold before you decant it.  I found that the drier my mold, the less time I had to let it set up.  
    Perhaps one of your mold pieces has something on it that resists water, that can slow the movement of moisture into the plaster and cause thin/weak spots.
    Nancy
  12. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Sillyhav15 in Removing Greenware From Ceramic Mold Questions   
    I have been able to rub the pinholes out at greenware.  Depending on what your mold looks like will depend on if your piece will crack.  How many pieces is your mold?  Is it mostly enclosed or have a large open area?  I have had some luck on a 3 piece mold taking one side and the bottom off, leaving the other side horizontal with the piece still inside of it. Then putting the first side back on and flipping it and exposing the wetter side to air.  
    You can reclaim the botched and dried pieces - takes time, but it can be done.
    It takes practice and time to make good slipware.  Good luck
    Nancy
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