Jump to content

Jhon

Members
  • Content Count

    18
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Jhon

  • Rank
    Member

Profile Information

  • Location
    VA

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Iron disulfide is know to cause bloating and there is an article on this site that talks about it. There is also a lot of synthetic iron that gets used in pottery.
  2. oxygenlimbesaw I never liked the idea adding oxides to clay or using clay that has a high oxide % and have only used red stoneware at other potteries. I wounder if the oxide that's being used is synthetic and if it's causing an issue. I think it has something to do with the way it reacts to oxygen at heat, but was unable to find any good information about the reaction and at what temp it happens at.
  3. Thank you. I'm sorry to say this but, oldlady. The OP's questions has to many variables to come out with a good straight forward answer. Have you had any issues with bulk pre made clay and the organic content with the "slow glaze" setting? I know at one point years (10+) ago it was an issue some pre made clay.
  4. The clay and glaze chemistry would change the firing rates. Having the right chemistry between the clay and the glaze will lower the chance of flaking, but the other issue is moisture in the clay leading to cracking, bubbles, and explosions. Steven Hill has some good articles on his website that are worth reading. http://www.stevenhillpottery.com/articles I'm sure there are a lot of good older books at the library that would be great reads.
  5. During the summer we fire our kilns 3 times a week. During the winter twice a week is more normal as all our yearly maintenance items are set up for the winter so I make less work. There have been times where our kilns have been opened at 250*F and reloaded as soon as the shelves cooled off. When I worked at a collage studio most of there electric kilns were fired 4 or 5 times a week.
  6. I grew up in production pottery and own one now. I learned to work off a production sheet that has a line drawing with all the needed. I have a sheet made for everything I mass produce on the wheel. Only part of the items I make I need the sheets on as I mass produce a lot of the same stuff. I watch a lot of YouTube to get ideas before I sit down to do something new. I'll make a production sheet after I make a few of something.
  7. Denice I used bagged clay for 4 moths and just stock piled my work. I wanted plenty of work ready for testing the new kilns and to have Items to sell once me moved into the pottery. There are safe ways to put a kiln in your basement. I would look at what it takes to build a 2 hour fire proof walls for the kiln room, talk to the building department for needed permits, and talk to your insurance company. I would hate to see something like a kiln issue causing damage and not being covered due to the kiln. It might be better to get a small shed for the kiln as it would keep your liability down and not heat up your house during the summer. At my pottery my kiln room (LP) is set off the building by a 10' covered walkway. My insurance company and my fire department like the gap between the 2 buildings.
  8. I think the stuff tends up in glazes is worse than silica. Just keep the dust down, dust with a wet cloth, and never sweep just mop. When I moved to VA I worked out of my basement with thick plastic hung up for my drying room and my wheel room for 4 months. I had the same company build my house and my pottery at the same time. The house was done first due to the wife. 1/2 dry wall is cheaper than MDF paneling. Think about long term layout before you begin. It's better to add walls later than to try to move walls.
  9. Bill Kielb Thanks for doing the math. The numbers look great. I would think you would be under 80% for propane due to the amount of lost heat out the flue and I would think reduction would also be bad. My understanding is depending on where you live in the world depends on what mix of LPG and butane you get. The colder it gets in a region the lower the butane % they would get due to vaporization issues. The delivered LPG could have a higher btu. Don't they still add propane to the natural gas pipeline in the north to keep the system working during a surge? I know there was talk about compressing NG to LNG during the summer and storing it for surges, but never read anything else on it.
  10. Bill Kielb I just looked at the EIA for VA residential LPG was $2.579 and wholesale was $.0812 on 11-18-19. Energy Information Administration They don't track prices during the off session. If you look at there US average cost of LP your right around $2.00 right now. Depending on where you live and what the demand for LP is depends on the cost. If I just had a 1,000 tank then yes my average cost would be around $3 to $3.75 a gallon.
  11. Bill Kielb I do knot know that much about kva math and left it all up to people that do it for a living. I wanted extra room on the electrical side as doing the second time cost to much money and did not know 100% for sure what all we would get into (also told 400 amp would help resale). We have two 1,000 sqf floors and a 250 sqf kiln room that's detached. Both floors have HVAC and the kiln room is heated off the boiler. We also have a mezzanine lift and a good size electric stacker. I have no true idea on how much LP gets used per kiln load, but were 99% sure it's under 25 gallons. We use 25 gallons a load for pricing and planning. We paid $1.98 a gallon year with $2.15 for the winter load if needed. Buying in bulk and having on site storage so you can buy during the cheap time of year is the only way to make the numbers work. I'm sorry, but you used a word "bisque". No thank you. Yes there is a place for bisque work and sometimes needed for some end results, but to me and the work I do it's a waist of time and money. I did not learn about bisque until my mid 20's when I worked at the collage pottery studio. In the 5 years I worked there I did not load, unload, or fire a bisque a kiln. neilestrick Electric kilns have there upside as you can walk away. Watts are watts, but for me my POCO was going to charge me to many fees for split vs 3 phase. With 3 phase sometimes the wire is cheaper, but the breakers cost more. My wife, 3 kids and I work at the pottery so I get to see my family all the time. My oldest daughter dose most of the glazing and all of the kiln work.
  12. We had fired a load of large vases that were for a client and the middle shelf support gave out when pulling the car out of the kiln. We had 1 vase that looked OK at first, but somehow I dropped it with in seconds of picking it up. I think my daughter dropped the first F bomb. She had just turned 21 and the first thing that popped into my head was to take her to the bar for lunch and a shoot.
  13. We built semi close to the road. With 3 phase we would of had to pay for new poles, the overhead wire, and rent or but the transformers. We were looking at going with a 600 amp service so we could run a few kilns at a time. We would of been on time of use and demand billing. With single phase the power company would pay for everything up to the service connection. We went with a true 400 amp meter with dual lugs, we added dual 200 disconnects next to the meter, and have a 200 amp panel on each floor. Were billed the same as a house. It was cheaper to get 4 new 1980 gallon LP tanks. All the power equipment was much cheaper also. We ended up having to go with a LP boiler for backup heat, but it also gives us unlimited hot water. The only down side for us not having 3 phase is our clay mixer motor was switched out to 7.5 hp and can not mix full batches of clay, but 2 people can still mix, pug, and clean up with 8,000+ LBS of clay in bins with 8 hours of work. We have 5,000 ish gallons of usable LP with out running the tanks to low in the wither without vaporization issues. My daughter fires both DD24 car kilns at the same time 2 or 3 times a week to cone 6 and think we use under 25 gallons of LP each load. She fires 4 to 6 loads a week. This year we got 6,250 gallons of LP in the spring with a contracted set price for a 1,500 gallons in the winter if needed. They start filling our tanks in the spring and finish late fall.
  14. I planned on going 3 phase electric kilns. The plan was to put in 2 polls and the transformers would be on the second poll. With it all penciled out it was much cheaper to go with LP. A Olympic DD24 (32 x 35 x 38) uses 29 gallons of LP to fire to cone 10. With LP it's all about owning a large amount of storage, planning the amount of gallons you will need, and setting out a good contract during the summer for the next year. The "demand billing fees" is whats gets a lot of people. Spend some time on the air adjustment as you will end up playing with them a lot at first. Depending on the type of burners you change out to it could be an upgrade, but might not be worth it. You might not need a new regulator on the kiln, but would need to get ride of the one that's on it. You will want 11" at the kiln and with 4 burners you would want 3/4" pipe.
  15. There could be big difference between your DNA and your sisters even with the same parents. On top of that a few times a year they change the primary data markers ancestors. If I'm not mistaken the church of LDS was the largest ($$$$$$$) push of the DNA database and I think they still have the largest database for DNA. The only thing I see wrong would for you to call your self or a product something that it's not.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.