Jump to content

MollyMac

Members
  • Content Count

    28
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from Hulk in Who wants to see an explosion, look here!   
    Okay, just started my class at the art center and my wonderful teacher, sculptor Linda Lewis, here in Des Moines, scolded me as she asked if I pre-heated. Um, no mam. Crap. But then she told a story of a thing she fired for a student with a 12 hour pre-heat and it blasted out a side. Lesson for me now, just slow down and let them dry for a month. Poke holes. hollow out, in the end, it will result in a more quality piece anyway.
  2. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Who wants to see an explosion, look here!   
    Okay, just started my class at the art center and my wonderful teacher, sculptor Linda Lewis, here in Des Moines, scolded me as she asked if I pre-heated. Um, no mam. Crap. But then she told a story of a thing she fired for a student with a 12 hour pre-heat and it blasted out a side. Lesson for me now, just slow down and let them dry for a month. Poke holes. hollow out, in the end, it will result in a more quality piece anyway.
  3. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Who wants to see an explosion, look here!   
    Okay, just started my class at the art center and my wonderful teacher, sculptor Linda Lewis, here in Des Moines, scolded me as she asked if I pre-heated. Um, no mam. Crap. But then she told a story of a thing she fired for a student with a 12 hour pre-heat and it blasted out a side. Lesson for me now, just slow down and let them dry for a month. Poke holes. hollow out, in the end, it will result in a more quality piece anyway.
  4. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from Bill Kielb in E26 error on Barlett V6-CF 700 series   
    To Bill: 
    Yup, I have the manual and it's there. It says either the TC wires are switched (which they are not) OR the board is bad. Oh yes, I have learned hard lessons about sculpture. This slow bisque was a second firing for more underglaze, nothing fancy.  Thankfully, this is still under warranty and I will contact them. It has only been fired about 6 times. One explosion which was totally my impatient fault. I had a feeling about this piece that I didn't pay attention to.  Please don't scold me, I'm new to this and trying. Thankfully I start my class at the art center in a few weeks and will be able to get some additional feedback. 
     
  5. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from Rae Reich in Who wants to see an explosion, look here!   
    When I was doing work in a class, I took it for granted that my pieces never exploded. I was a huge risk I never knew! But that proves to me how great a knowledgeable kiln person can be. Now that I have my own and am new, I'm making lots of educational mistakes! This one, NEVER AGAIN I hope. Just hope I didn't kill any of my kiln insides.
  6. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from Rae Reich in Who wants to see an explosion, look here!   
    Yup, big piece was final drying in kiln for 2 weeks, forgot to preheat!!!
  7. Like
    MollyMac reacted to dhPotter in Adding A Frit To An Oxide To Create An Oxide Wash   
    Test on test tiles - save the good stuff till the test tiles prove what you want to do. Less depressing...
  8. Like
    MollyMac reacted to oldlady in Adding A Frit To An Oxide To Create An Oxide Wash   
    molly mac, i am the least chemistry tech in the world.  yet i survive.  nobody has all the answers so asking sometimes leads to more interesting questions.
    yes, your original question was about using oxides and water to make a wash.     yes it is ok to do that.   
    HOWEVER, not all oxides are the best choices to use this way.   iron oxide, no matter what its name, yellow iron, red iron, black iron will all give you some kind of brown wash.     you would think that would be the same with other colors but do not use cobalt oxide and water for a wash.  my info is only derived from a thousand books and experience over 40 years.   use cobalt carbonate, it mixes with water better, cobalt oxide will leave little dark dots in unexpected places since it just does not mix well.   yes, the experts will say you can modify it but why when the carbonate works fine?  
    you can also dilute those pesky bottled underglazes before putting a brush into them.  pour the small amount into a larger container and add water.  then brush away.   you will have to spend some time learning how much of each will give you the effect you want but you do plan to learn something, right?   
    many times, more than you would like the lesson learned is "hmmm, i probably should not have done that............".    but  whatever it was you did taught you something.
  9. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from liambesaw in Adding A Frit To An Oxide To Create An Oxide Wash   
    oo very helpful, I'm writing that down in my notebook.I swear, if people only knew what chemistry masters potters are! Puts us weeny sculpture fairies to shame. At least it does me.
  10. Like
    MollyMac reacted to liambesaw in Adding A Frit To An Oxide To Create An Oxide Wash   
    Frits are glass that has been melted and then smashed and ground into a fine powder.  There are different frits available with different chemistries, but they are generally high in fluxes (glass melters), 3134 is high in boron which melts glass.  Frits are also a way to introduce normally soluble chemicals like strontium, lithium, etc into a glaze without worrying as much about them entering the water and crystallizing.
    Fluxes are things that help glass melt, there are a ton of them so it's a very general term.  In short the main ones for cone 6 and below are zinc and boron, zinc can wash out some stains, boron can add a slight blue cloudiness, but not in an oxide wash, only in a glaze.
  11. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from Hulk in Adding A Frit To An Oxide To Create An Oxide Wash   
    I have heard of this 50/50 wash somewhere, didn't know what the 50 was. I could just leave out the glycerin.
  12. Like
    MollyMac reacted to liambesaw in Adding A Frit To An Oxide To Create An Oxide Wash   
    My favorite wash recipe is 50 oxide, 50 3134 and hydrate with vegetable glycerin, but I use for brush painting only.  The glycerin keeps the wash from running, I haven't tried it for highlighting texture.  The common denominators here being oxide and flux with the popular fluxes being 3134 or GB
  13. Like
    MollyMac reacted to Min in Adding A Frit To An Oxide To Create An Oxide Wash   
    @MollyMac, the black wash on the pots in your top picture look like underglaze that has been wiped back. The amount of smudging, like in the pot in the foreground on the right, can vary depending on the brand of underglaze you use. I've found Duncan EZ012 wipes off the cleanest with minimal smudging. To get the effect like on those pots brush black underglaze over the pot then take a sponge and wipe it off. The underglaze will stay in the recesses and nooks and crannies. Every underglaze I've ever used has come too thick to use straight from the bottle, they can be watered down. When you are wiping down the pot it's really important to wipe, turn your sponge to a clean part, wipe then rinse the sponge out. Going over the pot with a dirty sponge will just leave you with a smudgy mess.
    Pot in the second picture could have been done a couple different ways but it looks like it had underglazes brushed on, solid coverage in the green, blue and orange areas on the lower part of the pot then some orange brushed loosely over the blue and green. I think it would then have been bisque fired then a black wash put over the whole thing and wiped down. For the neck of the pot it looks like orange and green underglaze was dabbed on and wiped down only slightly prior to bisque then a black wash overtop.
    Re iron and copper washes, the first link that Perkolator gave has some info from Linda Arbuckle on how she makes washes to be used on her majolica ware. For both a copper wash and an iron wash she uses 1 part copper or iron, 1 part ferro frit 3124 and 1 part bentonite, mixed in parts like teaspoons not weighed out. This is mixed with water to get a thin wash. Use very hot water to mix it up as the bentonite will just want to make a blob, if you have a small handheld mixer use that to get it all mixed in. If you get the copper wash on too thickly it will be a crusty black when fired. Brush it on then wipe it off the high points like the black underglaze. As always, try on test tiles before using on real work and wear gloves while working.
    You can also use gerstley borate plus iron, equal parts of each will give you a slightly glossy wash. If you want less gloss then try 2 parts iron to 1 part gerstley borate. I like using gerstley borate and iron washes, the gerstley helps suspend the heavy oxide particles without having to add bentonite. Gerstley borate can also be used with stains and other oxides in the same manner. If the colour is too intense then add 1 part ball clay. Stir them up frequently as you use them as the oxide particles are heavy and sink to the bottom of the container.
     
  14. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Who wants to see an explosion, look here!   
    When I was doing work in a class, I took it for granted that my pieces never exploded. I was a huge risk I never knew! But that proves to me how great a knowledgeable kiln person can be. Now that I have my own and am new, I'm making lots of educational mistakes! This one, NEVER AGAIN I hope. Just hope I didn't kill any of my kiln insides.
  15. Like
    MollyMac reacted to karenkstudio in What’s on your workbench?   
    assembled and ready for a gallery show.

  16. Like
    MollyMac reacted to karenkstudio in What’s on your workbench?   
    Working  on found object texture tiles to be raku fired and assembled for a wall hanging.

  17. Like
    MollyMac reacted to Mark C. in Who wants to see an explosion, look here!   
    Welcome to the learning curve of ceramics it takes about 50-60 years to start getting the hang of it.
  18. Like
    MollyMac reacted to liambesaw in Who wants to see an explosion, look here!   
    Dang. The only person I get to yell at is myself.  Luckily ive only blown one kiln load, and it blew real good.  Had a solid handle on a lidded jar and it blew up and destroyed every single piece in the kiln.  Learned my lesson that day and haven't been tempted to fire something "pretty dry" since haha
  19. Like
    MollyMac reacted to Min in Picture: How to get this colored effect?   
    Veronica Cay piece for which she says she used terra cotta clay with underglazes, engobes and stains. It's going to take some experimenting with brushing on then wiping off, building up layers etc.
  20. Like
    MollyMac got a reaction from Rae Reich in HELP! Newbie problem with Stephenson's Slip   
    Thanks, I think I must have misunderstood some advice I got. So that must have been it.  Somebody suggested I bisque this particular piece first since it was a very fragile construction, lots of pieces sticking out in the wind.  I knew the answer would be simple, jeeeez.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.