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tinbucket

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    tinbucket got a reaction from PeterH in Alumina (?) paper clay sheets   
    You may find this helpful. Although it is for a different application (I think?) the material is basically the same as Keraflex. Someone at Alfred University did some research on "tape casting" which is basically a ceramic matrix spread into a thin sheet using glycerine and PVA (Elmers) glue. A thin, flexible, unfired sheet of clay. Although the set up is relatively simple I think it will require some research and testing - the only advantages I see over Keraflex being availability and cost (although time is money). Good luck! Very curious what you plan on making with it. 
     
    https://static1.squarespace.com/static/527ac372e4b0d4e47bb0e554/t/527fd23fe4b0f7fd724aba83/1384108607291/tape+casting.pdf
    The student "cookbooks" in this second link also have some documentation of students' tests with tape casting. I don't remember where, you'll have to scan through and find them. The Alfred Grinding Room website is an excellent resource for other alternative ceramic processes as well. 
     
    http://www.alfredgrindingroom.com/recipes
  2. Like
    tinbucket reacted to liambesaw in Organic dot technique   
    Kind of looks like maybe a magnesium cobalt glaze that has had a clear glaze dripped on top forcing the cobalt to go back to blue.  I don't see anything in the way of crystals there
  3. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Best technique for thin-walled lighting fixture   
    I agree with you that making a mold and slip casting would give you the most desirable result. Any other method will fall short of slip casting when it comes to uniformity and thinness imho. One thing to consider is the heat that can build up in an enclosed light fixture. If you use an incandescent bulb and don't have any venting it will get hot. Also since the form will be round on all sides and translucent porcelain is usually somewhat pyroplastic, you might consider making a cradle of sorts to support the piece in the firing (similar to th way bone china is fired).  Best of luck. I hope you post pictures of the process and results!
  4. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from PeterH in Underglaze Bleeding Wanted!   
    If you notice both examples of running/bleeding you posted are blue, most likely a cobalt (carbonate or oxide) wash rather than an underglaze. If you are after blue, I would use a cobalt wash rather than underglaze. Unless it is very thinly applied, cobalt will have a tendency to run or bleed. 
  5. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Underglaze Bleeding Wanted!   
    If you notice both examples of running/bleeding you posted are blue, most likely a cobalt (carbonate or oxide) wash rather than an underglaze. If you are after blue, I would use a cobalt wash rather than underglaze. Unless it is very thinly applied, cobalt will have a tendency to run or bleed. 
  6. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from JeffK in Defloculated slip   
    Another way to achieve the same thing as adding powdered clay (if you don't have any) is to evaporate some of the water from the deflocculated slip. A wide, low container will give more surface area to evaporate the water and achieve the desired consistency. 
  7. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from BlackDogPottery in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    This may be helpful: 
     
     

  8. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Rae Reich in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    This may be helpful: 
     
     

  9. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from yappystudent in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    This may be helpful: 
     
     

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