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  1. Like
    What? got a reaction from Rae Reich in Creating texture with airbrush or gun   
    Apply a thick slip to your piece with a brush or your hand and start using the the airbrush/spray gun or just an airgun to move the thick slip around until you find a texture you like. I feel just spraying layer after layer you will not build up a heavy texture because the way the spray gun distributes the slip evenly.  Applying too much slip to an already wet piece may cause the pot to slump or collapse. Good luck.
  2. Like
    What? reacted to Mark C. in Clean Footrings   
    With what you call cold wax -using a small cut damp sponge gives you a very clean edge.
  3. Like
    What? reacted to Joseph Fireborn in How do you feel about being called talented?   
    So this post is a bit important to me. I have experienced this a lot with different things throughout my life and it did me a disservice most of the time until I later realized what talent is and isn't.
    talent: the ability to start something and do reasonably well in the beginning stages. ex: you pickup a brush and paint a flower that is pretty decent the first try, or you take piano lessons and are able to play the beginning music pretty well.
    skill: the ability to practice relentlessly until you are able to become really good at something, which people will then later credit to your talent. ** SEE MIN's better definition below. **
    So some backstory. When I was growing up I was pretty good at beginning most things. I did a lot of art stuff,  I did some music and other things. I was able to enter almost any field rather quickly and do reasonably well. I was told I was "talented" many times. This boosted my ego and made me feel confident about a lot of things. However it didn't do me any good, because I was "talented" I never really put in the practice when things got hard. I would go back to something I could do more easily. Eventually I would not gain any progress and I would switch to something else. I repeated this same beginner to intermediate pattern over and over. The entire time being told by my parents that I was so talented and I can do anything I put my mind to.
    Well anyone can do anything they put their mind to, that isn't some special "talent" that only some of us have. If you work hard, study and find someone to help you get through the rough spots; anyone can do most things well given enough time and relentlessness. 
    So if someone tells me I am talented now, I just reply, "Hard work and practice, not talent." I think most people then pause and are slightly confused at why I just didn't take their praise. But in the end I am trying to persuade them to use different words. I have an example of this in my real life parenting that I am already adjusting my phrases with my son.
    Story time:
    I do a lot of polymer clay with my son. The kind you bake in the oven with lots of colors. We like making figurines from our imagination and then play with them later. I have made hundreds with him from age 2 to 6. About 4 months ago we were making some figures who had round balls as their body. I was rolling up balls and putting them together. He was trying to do the same. He looks up in frustration and says, "I am not TALENTED like you daddy. Can you make these nice round balls for me?!" I told him talent had nothing to do with it and that I had been playing with polymer clay since I was a kid his age. He didn't get it. I told him I wasn't going to make his clay balls for him. He got up in frustration and said he was going to go do something else. I made him come back and sit down. I plucked off 10 pieces of clay the same size and I said "Sit your butt down and make 10 balls the best you can. Start here and line them up as you go." So he started making balls. The first few were crappy because he had a bad attitude, but as he kept going he got better and better. By the 10th ball he had pretty much a perfect sphere. He looked up at me with awe. Like I had just unlocked the universe for him, and he was slightly peeved it was that easy to do in just 10 balls. I just said, "hard work and practice son." We sat there for another few hours and made more figurines. 
    Of course I have to keep re-enforcing this habit all the time, he still attributes hard work to "talent" a lot of the time. His school still has the "talent show" instead of the "show us your skills" show. Mostly because everyone around him always attributes things to talent. It is rather frustrating. Even his teachers tell us that he is talented in some of his subjects at the parent conferences. Yea he is real talented in reading... is that even a thing? Mostly because his mother was in his room reading books to him for an hour every night before bed and we made him relentlessly sound out his words and learn phonics when he was in kindergarten. Nothing talented about it, hard work and a lot of arguments. 
    The idea of being talented is much more romantic then just thinking about putting in a lot of hours, study and patience to get something right. I mostly attribute it to the optimism curve. 

    This curve above is basically how we learn about things. Everything is awesome when you first start something you are "talented" at. You are making great progress and things are going epic. Your uninformed optimism gets you a long way. Then things get hard. You start to realize your going to have to make some decisions, you have informed pessimism. Common things you say are, maybe this isn't the stuff I want to do, maybe I should do something else instead, you start finding things to do instead of what you need to be doing to get better.
    Eventually you hit crisis of meaning, this is where you either decide it wasn't for you, or you just put it off forever. Then you either crash and quit, or you realize you have to get good at something it requires more than talent, it requires hard work, study, practice and finding help from others further along in what you want to do. Finally you have informed optimism! 
    I would say most people never make it to informed optimism. If someone says you are talented, they probably have never taken something all the way to informed optimism, because they would know that it isn't talent, but hard work that go you to where you are! I feel slightly sorry for these people as they probably are sad they never had any talents!
    So yea. They mean well, but change their thinking! 
     
  4. Like
    What? reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Community Challenge #9   
    Looks like someone was busy harvesting snowman brains! 
    Nice pot.
  5. Like
    What? got a reaction from Rex Johnson in Wedging Table Design...   
    Mine is outside against the wall. I did shim the front bottom so the table is at maybe a 10- 15 degrees slope. I find this angle helps with the wrist not being bent back as much. Also water sheds off of it. I have a cotton duck top. When I have the means and time I will weld up a frame with the slope (because I love it) and pour in a 3-4 inches slab plaster. I would store in the studio and not outside.
  6. Like
    What? reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Please Help: Porcelain Dries Unevenly Before I Can Trim   
    Flip the pots to dry upside down as soon as they're able to bear weight. It slows the drying down somewhat, and definitely evens things out.
  7. Like
    What? reacted to S. Dean in Glaze Chemical Containers - Help!   
    My favorite source of free buckets is my dry cleaner.  They purchase laundry detergent in 5 gallon buckets and are happy to give me the empty ones instead of throwing them away.  The best part is that the buckets are clean.  Much better than scavenging used drywall buckets like I did before. 
     
    -SD
  8. Like
    What? got a reaction from glazenerd in Glaze Chemical Containers - Help!   
    It might be a good a idea to take pictures of the label and other pertinent information for reordering or searching for a compatible/replacement product in the future. I wont remember once that bag is gone and a decade has gone by.
  9. Like
    What? got a reaction from Chilly in Qotw: Participants Question Pool For Future Qotw's   
    Do you wedge? What style? Ramshead, spiral, wire and slam, pugmill, etc. Why? Do you also orientate the spiral shape to the rotation of your wheel?
  10. Like
    What? reacted to Mark C. in Is This The Norm In Arts Education?   
    Not surprised at all-We have local collage instructor (Fine arts degree MFA) who cannot throw on a wheel and teaches wheel throwing-go figure.
    I will add that students feel they are getting short changed in her class.
    Not knowing the past seems to be the norm these days.
    I'm thinking of just buying a 3 d printer  myself and having all my production done with that-no need to touch clay anymore right?
    I'm glad I have a few Otto Heino pots and a story about Patty Warashina dancing in my kitchen back in the day but really -nowadays I think most could care less about the past.If its not on your phone its not real right?
  11. Like
    What? reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Questions For Airbrushing Glazes And Oxides   
    Nice. I just followed you(I like those xxx jugs). I don't spend much time on instagram, once in the morning and once in the afternoon. I don't follow many people as most people put to much personal stuff in their feeds and I don't really like seeing pictures of random selfies. 
     
    Anyways. Thanks about my cups. I like the dots as well, they are of significance to me personally. I have them in my stamp as well. 
     
    As far as the application goes, I find application of glazes to be the most important part of glaze work. I am always looking for new ways to do things. I recently just posted an experiment I had talked about in the news feed. The new method for applying a glaze to those yunomi. I think it will look good. Kiln is cooling now so I will post the follow up to it even if it doesn't look great. 
     
    I think the air brush will be really nice for adding coloring to my work. I use an atomizor for a lot of my detail work like the fake ash and the colorants I put over it. It gets annoying. If I could get an air brush to do the same work then it would be a lot better. I am not buying any new equipment right now as I have plans to buy a lot of clay soon and I need to save for that shipping cost. But once I start officially selling pots again, which should be very soon then I will probably buy one with that profit. I will post a follow up here once I test and use it a few times. It wont be for months though probably.
     
    A little off topic here but I find a large natural sponge with big porous holes dipped in glaze and then applied over a pot adds a really beautiful natural pattern that doesn't look man made. Just an FYI if your looking for that kind of stuff.
  12. Like
    What? reacted to glazenerd in A Categorically Delicate Topic   
    What:
    The farm up the road has a few hundred head of cattle. My master plan was to put out multiple salt licks to increase soluble salt content: and go for cone 04. If that fails: salted butter and hamburger.
    Nerd
  13. Like
    What? reacted to Mark C. in A Categorically Delicate Topic   
    Well lets see luster fires have the worst smell in my memory-cat pee fired hot has the second worse smell I know of.
    I'll take toxic plastic fumes anyway over hot cats pee cooking in a kiln .
    I never had a cat pee on wares only the outter jacket once of an electric-I did not know this until I was firing.
    My guess and its just a guess is the (hopefully you bisqued to 08 or more?)  salts are left behind and staining the wares .How about washing then bisquing again a tad hotter.
  14. Like
    What? got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Qotw:what Were The Early Warning Signs That You Were Interested In Making Art, Being Artistically Creative, At A Young Age (Under 18)?   
    I would not say I am artistic but..... My father being an industrial arts teacher and all around handyman fixer upper tinkerer rubbed off on me at a young age. When I was four years old my dad built a very large workbench with all the bells and whistles. I got to help dad build this. Shortly after finishing this build I proceeded to pound about twenty or thirty nails of very size into the top of this bench well you can imagine what a four year olds workmanship would look like ( bent over nails hammered down many dents across surface. My mom came out to see what I was up to. I don't remember my mom being angry or shocked. I do remember when dad got home that mom said I had something to show him ( I was very proud of what I did). We went to the shop and I explained what a fantastic job I did and how it all went down. My dad gave me a big hug and said he loved it and I did a great job. He then laid acrylic over the work top to immortalize my creation. I would say from then on my move from what might have been artistic graduated into finer craftsmanship.
  15. Like
    What? reacted to Mark C. in Motor Oil Or Kerosene In Clay Body?   
    This may be that new clay that self fires itself -you light it like self starting charcoal .
    The newer cars use flex fuel and this may be the latest in thinking clay wise.
  16. Like
    What? got a reaction from Min in Qotw:what Were The Early Warning Signs That You Were Interested In Making Art, Being Artistically Creative, At A Young Age (Under 18)?   
    I would not say I am artistic but..... My father being an industrial arts teacher and all around handyman fixer upper tinkerer rubbed off on me at a young age. When I was four years old my dad built a very large workbench with all the bells and whistles. I got to help dad build this. Shortly after finishing this build I proceeded to pound about twenty or thirty nails of very size into the top of this bench well you can imagine what a four year olds workmanship would look like ( bent over nails hammered down many dents across surface. My mom came out to see what I was up to. I don't remember my mom being angry or shocked. I do remember when dad got home that mom said I had something to show him ( I was very proud of what I did). We went to the shop and I explained what a fantastic job I did and how it all went down. My dad gave me a big hug and said he loved it and I did a great job. He then laid acrylic over the work top to immortalize my creation. I would say from then on my move from what might have been artistic graduated into finer craftsmanship.
  17. Like
    What? got a reaction from High Bridge Pottery in Qotw:what Were The Early Warning Signs That You Were Interested In Making Art, Being Artistically Creative, At A Young Age (Under 18)?   
    I would not say I am artistic but..... My father being an industrial arts teacher and all around handyman fixer upper tinkerer rubbed off on me at a young age. When I was four years old my dad built a very large workbench with all the bells and whistles. I got to help dad build this. Shortly after finishing this build I proceeded to pound about twenty or thirty nails of very size into the top of this bench well you can imagine what a four year olds workmanship would look like ( bent over nails hammered down many dents across surface. My mom came out to see what I was up to. I don't remember my mom being angry or shocked. I do remember when dad got home that mom said I had something to show him ( I was very proud of what I did). We went to the shop and I explained what a fantastic job I did and how it all went down. My dad gave me a big hug and said he loved it and I did a great job. He then laid acrylic over the work top to immortalize my creation. I would say from then on my move from what might have been artistic graduated into finer craftsmanship.
  18. Like
    What? reacted to Pres in Would You Sell Pottery That Has A Tiny Crack In The Glaze In A Few Places?   
    If the pot with the impurity is to be sold, I would consider grinding and refiring.
     
    I believe that there comes a time in life when a pot sold with a crack, or imperfection comes back to haunt you some way or another. Is it just me, no, I don't think so, I have talked to lots of potters that believe the same. Have I been haunted, yes. I observe over the years that the growth of a crafter can not move forward unless at some point they make the conscious, or unconscious decision to be selective and honest with themselves about their work. Some end up giving up because that honesty is difficult or because they are not willing to put in the time to move forward. Others continue to make, but only for themselves and family/friends, and yet become much more than they ever were when they were trying to sell. These folks, if they decided to go back into the market at a later stage in their life would find the process enlightening.
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  19. Like
  20. Like
    What? reacted to Mark C. in Does This Make Sense? (Purchasing Equipment On Credit)   
    I think folks just cannot wrap their hearts and heads around tossing out clay. Everything seems so precious to many. 
    As a production potter I threw away all my trimmings for over 3 decades -just not worth the effort 3 -5 gallon buckets a week.I still toss out the trimmings  every week. (dry porcelain trimmings do not slake and throw well after processing)
    The reason to have one of these machines for me is you can make hard clay soft -soft clay hard -you can mix your own bodies and as a side note you can reclaim your wet scrap.Since my wrist surgery I use the machine for all my wedging .They call it a power wedger
    Since a ton of clay is say around $500 it will take a long time for this to pay for itself.
    I bought mine to be able to continue working in clay without 3 wrist bones on my right hand.It has made a differance. I cannot tolerate hard clay anymore and since I buy 10 tons at one time it slowly gets are and I can soften it very easily .
    The question is will I get my $3200 out of it  before I cannot use it anymore?-well maybe not in clay costs but in income at over 100K in pottery gross sales a year even a 5 year
    extension  to working my answer is yes payback will happen. I think most the answer is no.They do keep a solid resale price. so you can sell it later and still have some $.
    I hope some of these circumstances show some not so thought of beneficial uses.
    What I cannot wrap around is the small units that process 7-25#s-they make no sense to me.They are made for the hobby market and they are selling like hotcakes.Its like a kitchen aid mixer that only works with a 1/4 cup of ingredients.Yet the cost almost as much as a full size machine.
  21. Like
    What? reacted to Chris Campbell in Does This Make Sense? (Purchasing Equipment On Credit)   
    Will someone please explain to me why you would PAY $5,000 to re-use diluted clay rather than buy fresh, new clay with the money?
     
    I can see it in a teaching studio or a large operation with low pay helpers doing the chore ....
    but not if the 'talent' is doing this job instead of creating pots.
  22. Like
    What? reacted to dhPotter in Show Me Your Handy Dandy Spray Booth   
    Plastic trash can spray booth. Mine is 1 year old.
     
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.417445012878.195322.344268547878&type=3
     
     
    I bought the filters Mark C. suggested - 12"x 12" VEGA Furnace, Vent and Air Conditioner Filter - 3 Pack
     
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MR6HE7I/ref=od_aui_detailpages00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  23. Like
    What? got a reaction from 47runner in Heat Gun Options   
    The cheap one from Harbor Freight is a good option. It also comes in handy to do stoppers and knobs dries clay pretty quick cut off the hump attach and no smudging or prints. Please take into consideration the cautions mentioned by others. Also if you use a heat gun keep it pointed away from others. It can even melt splash pans when left unattended. Can easily start a fire in no time quick. I have a fan I place to assist in drying when making sectionals. I do use heat gun for very large bowls and shoulders of large bottles.
  24. Like
    What? got a reaction from Chilly in Can't Throw, Can Extrude   
    Nice. This die is great.
  25. Like
    What? reacted to Marcia Selsor in Qotw: Do You Like Innies Or Outies?   
    I think it is a matter of form follows function. Galleys for casseroles should have a galley where the lid sits inside the rim to prevent the food from boiling over.
    Urns on the other hand , are sealed shut and the visual balance of the vessel to the top accented by an outie is an aesthetic choice.
    Cookie jars may need to be outie as well, and possibly less prone to chipping by eager eaters.
    Teapots need a deep flange to counter weight tipping while pouring. I make teapots with both innies and outies with a deep 1.5-2" flange.
     
    Marcia
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