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Mug

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  1. Like
    Mug reacted to neilestrick in Filling The Kiln With Tiles   
    The mass of the tiles doesn't worry me too much. Just go a little slower at the top end and the heat will penetrate through. Assuming your kiln has the power to get to cone 6, it should be able to fire a heavy load of tiles to low fire temps. What I don't like is the kiln furniture and tiles being right up against the walls. It's not good for the elements or the tiles to have them right up close like that- it can cause hot spots and burnouts in the elements, and hot spots on your work. Always stay an inch away from the walls.
  2. Like
    Mug got a reaction from 1515art in Can Tall Teapots Like These Be Handbuilt? These Are Extruded   
    If your happy and successful at hand building you should set up your equipment to do just that.
     
    Wow Mark there are plenty of people through out time who have never set foot in front of a pottery wheel on a daily basis and make a living with casting clay, hand building or stamping clay with a press. While I see the point of throwing on a wheel by yourself as a money maker, casting clay, hand building, and stamping clay are all the methods you would use if you were to add a number of employees from a business point of view. One of the top sellers in pottery on Etsy uses a slab roller and stamps, someones imagination motivation and business skills may be the limitation.
     
    I seen the video and in the description  it mentioned  "Judy uses an hydraulic extruder as a basis for her non-functional teapot forms." A hydraulic extruder is not your everyday clay extruder and would certainly cost quite a bit. You would probably need a larger hydraulic extruder to make the big teapots she made and then you would need a method to fire a large piece.
     
    Scaling that idea down a little to use a smaller extruder. I have not personally used the TA Metalworks extruder listed on Ebay. It is reasonably priced and it looks like it's well designed and would probably work well. They may even be able to build a larger extruder for a reasonable cost. If you are hand building it may be perfect for you.
     
    One last thing, you may try using paper clay slabs for this type a form. Paper clay has many advantages for hand built work.  
  3. Like
    Mug reacted to Pugaboo in Selling Pottery 101   
    Mark, I just want to say thank you. You share so much of yourself and your experience with all of us here. I know I have learned tons reading your posts. Things like your spoonrests and sponge holders I read what and how you do them then took that information and figured out how to make them work for me and they DID. I never would have imagined such simple little items could do so much.
     
    Thank you for sharing.
     
    T


  4. Like
    Mug got a reaction from Cavy Fire Studios in Haaaalp! I Think I Killed Fred! :'(   
    I'm happy to hear it all worked out.
     
    In the future for those of you who may not know what to look for....
     
    A spark, b-z-z-t-t-t, snap, crackle, pop any unusual visual display, abnormally high temperature, or noise is good indicator somethings not right.
     
    A loose connection on a plug, breaker, ect. Shut The Power OFF and check it out immediately. If you can't find the cause it's best to call in a second pare of eyes to give it a second look.
     
    If it's a loose connection, simply tightening the screw will save the day, the part, and possibly your building. 
    Sometime the possible points of failure are in more that one spot and you'll want to check every screw and every mechanical contact point.
    Screws sometimes work loose, breakers start to fail, things get hot because they are loose, then get exponentially worse and they short cause fires and ruin parts.
     
    There are lots of people who hate working with anything electrical and may unknowingly overlook a potentially dangerous situation.
    I'm very OCD when it comes to electrical.  While servicing and installing electrical devises I've seen lots of electrical things fail over the years and to me this is common sense. Double and triple check yourself if it's necessary, OCD can be a good thing when working with electricity. I hope this may help someone avoid problems in the future.
  5. Like
    Mug got a reaction from Evenstar in Hiring Studio Potters Question   
    Wow, your studio is exceptionally beautiful. I admire the simple yet elegant presentation and timeless style of your work.
     
    I'm not sure if I will actually be of any help, but I live close to the Ohio river and in the early 1900's we were home to some of the largest pottery's in the United states. Some members of my family worked in these pottery's years ago. There were wheel throwing production potters employed up and down the Ohio river at one time. To throw on the wheel you would have to ask  your supervisor a few times and eventually they would let you try. Getting a job throwing was rather simple, you were given one shot at throwing, if you showed promise and could keep up with the other production potters after three days you had a job that paid well. If you failed to produce enough ware you were sent back to the assembly line. I think this goes to show some average people were cut out for it and some were not. You didn't a masters degree in fine arts to work in the pottery. The production potter did not design a freaking thing, nor did they want a production potters input until you had held that position for years. Production wheel thrown pottery jobs are nonexistent at any of the local pottery's that are currently in business. A prototype design may still  be hand thrown by a master potters hand and even that concept is getting tossed as the 3D printers are getting better.  Everything is all about modern production methods.
     
    To sum it up throwing at the pottery was just another job that paid a little better than some of the other jobs. The jobs were filled by numerous people trying to make a better living wage, some made it and the majority never had the opportunity to try again.  Would it fly in today's society?
    Absolutely, I would say average people still need jobs and it could work if you are willing to deal with the sheer numbers of the people it will take to find one good potter looking for a steady pay check.
  6. Like
    Mug got a reaction from Pres in Handles Torquing   
    It looks like your handle was off center to the right ( about half the handle width) and not in line with the spout to begin with.
    This may be adding visually to the torquing that you are describing.
     
    It's not hard to get things off center and not parallel on a round object. There are numerous reasons why a teapot is very hard to build  correctly.
  7. Like
    Mug reacted to Mark C. in Liability Of Making Lamps?   
    When you start with a Lawyer you will end with one or at least a bigger bill.
    I would use the highest quality parts and not worry about it after I had the insurance . I have potter friends who have sold working lamps for 4 plus decades .
    As far as suing it can happen over a napkin.
  8. Like
    Mug got a reaction from stephsteph in Corbels   
    These will be hand sculpted with moderate detail, Douglas Fey Pottery has some fantastic corbel designs that are on the same level of detail . I was thinking that these would be sculpted on the thicker side and was shocked to see you would go to 3/4" to 1 1/2" thick. The extra thickness would make things easier from a sculptors point of view. Thank you! When I work with paper clay things have to be thinner most of the time.
     
    I was going to try Standards 547 clay, It sounds like a good choice, but I'll be up around Ravenna, Kent, Akron Ohio next and they have a Laguna clay supplier. I may try the East coast version of Red Sculpture clay or see if they carry something with a little less grog.
      Laguna Clay is looking a little more appealing as it is about half the price. Standard becomes a little more competitive when you buy by the ton.
    If I fall in love with sculpting terracotta, Standards 547 is on my list.
     
    I'm really looking forward to this and cant wait to try something new.
  9. Like
    Mug got a reaction from stephsteph in Corbels   
    I will make them a structural component... Ha Ha Ha 
     Just joking I will certainly use the overwhelming non-structural advice.
     
    Nerd I have a cheesy modern Gargoyle designed corbel that fits our kitschy kitchen style.
     
     It's fantastic that most of us on the ceramics forum can make our own creations and yet we never seem to save much making it ourselves.
     
    We live in the country and thankfully have no zoning or building codes to follow other than the national requirements. Hopefully it will remain that way. As it stands, our community has managed to fix any problems without needing someone in charge on a power trip.
     
    Some really good mounting ideas, I will probably use bolts and score the back.
     
    I use paper clay for mid-fire functional sculpture when it needs to be used. Stoneware paper clay sculptures on the large scale can be very challenging to work with.
     
    I remember some lower fire sculptural terracotta clay's tested extremely well in a destructive test someone ran awhile back. Would any one recall the type of clay and what temperature it fired at. Choosing the right clay from the start would be my goal.
  10. Like
    Mug got a reaction from oldlady in Sharpening Loop Trimming Tools   
    It sounds like you have found a solution that works for you. Here is another method that may help, I do make my own tools and sharpen them.
     
    Sharpening will be a lot faster with multiple grits. I would use at least three grits Coarse, Medium, and Fine. In my shop I would use 100 180 and 220. If I was feeling ambitious the fourth would be a coarse fast cutting jewelers rouge compound applied to a hard felt buffing wheel.
     
    Set the new bevel with  a coarse grit power sander, 80 to 100 grit, this operation with practice, should take one to two seconds.
    A disk sander for the flat areas. For the curved areas a small Dremel drum sander attachment mounted in a drill press for control. Have a can of water close to dip keep the tool cool after each grinding operation.
     
    Once the bevel is established
    You progress to a medium 100 to 220 grit sand paper, Your goal in each of the succeeding steps is to remove the coarse scratches from the previous step. Ten to twenty swipes starting with the coarsest grit should do it. With practice this should take less than a minute or two. The fine grit sand paper could be 220 to 600 grit. As the grit gets finer you hand work doubles. If you took ten swipes with your medium grit it will take twenty swipes over the fine grit to remove the medium grit scratches.
     
    Use 3M super 77 adhesive to attach sand paper to a tempered glass panel, a flat ceramic tile, or a flat cast iron table for the flat areas. Glue sand paper to a dowel rod for the curved areas.
     
    A swage block that matches the contour of your tool can be made from wood and will make sharpening a specific shape quick. Your sandpaper glues to the shape cut from a nice hardwood like Hard Rock Maple. With some imagination a swage block with various contours could be made from pressing various shapes into clay and then fire the clay to make it sturdy.
     
    As an example:
    for a 1/4 round 3/8"  swage, you would drill out a piece of hard wood to 3/8". Quarter the wood so that 1/4th of the drilled radius remains then glue sand paper to your new swage that matches the 3/8" outside diameter perfectly.
     
    The final stage would be a buffer with Jewelers rouge. I would use 4" to 6" felt disk because the edge on a clay tool is not very wide. The felt buffer disks can be used on a buffer or a drill press with a proper mandrell. A sewn fabric disk would work on a high speed buffer, but it may rip the tool from your hand easier. Dremel makes small drum type felt buffer tips for the curved areas if you have trouble using a regular buffer disk.
  11. Like
    Mug got a reaction from MatthewV in Any Potter/machinists In Our Ranks?   
    I have a metal lathe, but It will never be cheaper to make your own parts unless you have buddy that has machine equipment and will run them for free. I would find a product that exists and adapt them for your own use. If you give a little more detail about what you are working on; someone on the forum can help.
  12. Like
    Mug reacted to MikeFaul in I Hate Wedging   
    "Hate" is a very strong word for a mere task...
     
    I'm rather indifferent toward it, it just has to get done. I suppose I even kind of like it. It's sort of a puzzle. How can I portion the clay, wedge it, and setup on at the wheel for daily production to maximum efficiency? How would this vary for a new form? Doing it right can make a big difference in daily productivity.
     
    It's time consuming and our clay consumption rate is getting rather high so Peter Pugger here we come... That will bring new challenges, how much of a 3" diameter pug needs to be cut for each form? How can we make adjustable cutters for our forms to cut multiple pugs as we extrude?
     
    I had a mentor who heard me say I "hated" something once and he gently pulled me aside and whispered in my ear; "Why don't you just change your mind, and have a beautiful day?"
     
    I realized that most of things I was "hating" were a matter of choice, and I could just as easily choose to "like" them. Or, at least "enjoy" them, or "enjoy" the opportunity to learn and develop my technique from them... I didn't have to be a victim of the things around around me. The attitude we bring to our work is just as important as technique. 
  13. Like
    Mug got a reaction from douglas in Jiggering Conundrum...help With Crack!?   
    I think the outer edge of the plate  is where the trouble starts. It's thinner and uneven in roundness, causing the outer edge to dry quicker. Some people wrap the outer edge with plastic to allow the center to dry faster.
     
    You could try making a new jig shape that will make a round plate that is even in thickness and goes all the way to the outer edge of the plate.
  14. Like
    Mug got a reaction from ChenowethArts in Valentine's Day - Marketing/sale Opportunity?   
    I would make His and Her mugs that would sell all year round. If you make something too specific, dated items, like Mark mentioned You'll be sipping coffee from you own scrap pile. One off items are great, but you can get to specific. I would only date an item if it was 100% paid for. His and Her, Mom and Dad, items will always be popular. Pessimistic people and parents will always love the divorce items and sets that can be separated and stand on their own.
  15. Like
    Mug got a reaction from GiselleNo5 in Slip Cast Ice Cream Cone?   
    A coarse waffle cone may need to be a three piece mold.
    It might be significantly quicker, easier and cheaper to add texture to a clay slab then make your cone.
     
    If you need to make the ice cream, try adding some things the clay that will burn out. Saw dust may work.
  16. Like
    Mug got a reaction from Rae Reich in Slip Cast Ice Cream Cone?   
    A coarse waffle cone may need to be a three piece mold.
    It might be significantly quicker, easier and cheaper to add texture to a clay slab then make your cone.
     
    If you need to make the ice cream, try adding some things the clay that will burn out. Saw dust may work.
  17. Like
    Mug got a reaction from Tyler Miller in How Do You Do Custom Orders?   
    If you’re creating a lot of one off items in your comfort zone you'll probably live on custom work requests. Taking a custom job out of the comfort zone always loses money. Quality functional pottery takes a ton of R&D before you finally get a keeper. It would have to be a big order to make it worthwhile.
     
    If I find someone hard to deal with they get charged at least 3X. I'm absolutely happy with taking the price up and well beyond what they will pay.
     
    I'm surprised to see how many people would want a 100% down. I take 30% which covers labor, overhead and materials, but no profit on a resalable item. 50% covers some of the profit on personalized items, but I would lose more of the profit if they never picked up the Item. I have only had two personalized items that were not picked up and one those two had a good reason.
    I have taken a 100% in some instances; some people like to pay upfront.
    When I require a deposit and the balance paid on deliver, I never ask for it, but I usually get a nice tip from a happy customer and no tip when it has been paid for up front.
  18. Like
    Mug got a reaction from TallTayl in How I Pack Pots For Shipping   
    While were on the subject of packing... Double boxing is now scientifically proven!
     
    My son double boxed his egg for his Physics class at school. The box was attached to a parachute that failed every time.
    The Physics teacher was convinced that it would fail. He was a bit perplexed, it was his first time seeing something double boxed.
    They dropped the egg 3 times from various heights and the box hit hard but the egg survived every time.
     
    Thanks to every one here at the forum for my sons A
  19. Like
    Mug got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in How I Pack Pots For Shipping   
    While were on the subject of packing... Double boxing is now scientifically proven!
     
    My son double boxed his egg for his Physics class at school. The box was attached to a parachute that failed every time.
    The Physics teacher was convinced that it would fail. He was a bit perplexed, it was his first time seeing something double boxed.
    They dropped the egg 3 times from various heights and the box hit hard but the egg survived every time.
     
    Thanks to every one here at the forum for my sons A
  20. Like
    Mug got a reaction from Surubee in How I Pack Pots For Shipping   
    While were on the subject of packing... Double boxing is now scientifically proven!
     
    My son double boxed his egg for his Physics class at school. The box was attached to a parachute that failed every time.
    The Physics teacher was convinced that it would fail. He was a bit perplexed, it was his first time seeing something double boxed.
    They dropped the egg 3 times from various heights and the box hit hard but the egg survived every time.
     
    Thanks to every one here at the forum for my sons A
  21. Like
    Mug got a reaction from GEP in How I Pack Pots For Shipping   
    While were on the subject of packing... Double boxing is now scientifically proven!
     
    My son double boxed his egg for his Physics class at school. The box was attached to a parachute that failed every time.
    The Physics teacher was convinced that it would fail. He was a bit perplexed, it was his first time seeing something double boxed.
    They dropped the egg 3 times from various heights and the box hit hard but the egg survived every time.
     
    Thanks to every one here at the forum for my sons A
  22. Like
    Mug got a reaction from Pugaboo in How I Pack Pots For Shipping   
    While were on the subject of packing... Double boxing is now scientifically proven!
     
    My son double boxed his egg for his Physics class at school. The box was attached to a parachute that failed every time.
    The Physics teacher was convinced that it would fail. He was a bit perplexed, it was his first time seeing something double boxed.
    They dropped the egg 3 times from various heights and the box hit hard but the egg survived every time.
     
    Thanks to every one here at the forum for my sons A
  23. Like
    Mug got a reaction from DirtRoads in Black Friday/shop Small Saturday   
    Dirt roads...That reminds me how importaint local sales are...I have a good rural location and have got to get at least a small on site building put up this comming year.
     
    Oldlady, Love your display stands for your slab work.
    The book keeping is like a free lunch...can't complain.
  24. Like
    Mug reacted to Mark C. in Handles   
    Back in the day I used to use needle tools to scratch with and pulled handles all handles-that was the 70's.
    In the past 35 years I have made so many mugs (this is all in Porcelain) that the process needed to be speeded up.
    Sometime in the 80s I cut my handle in half and made dies in aluminum (cross section) ( I have 4 sizes) and extruded the handles-the byproduct was a homemade handle the same as mine (not tapered) and the handle was a lot stronger. (extruded compresses clay). I shoot two handles at a time(the length) and load a bat up with 30 handles at a time. I keep a slip container next to wheel and use my throwing slip with vinegar added to connect handles-I use a brush for the slip. I use a metal serrated flat rib(its oval shaped) to score mugs ( one pass equals about 10 with  needle tool) and also same tool to cut angle on handle.I cover mugs one night to equalize then dry as fast as needed.This system is not for everyone only those who need to make mugs fast and have time for other things-its a production potter deal.All of my fellow production potters make handles in similar fashion with their own spin.
    When making large mugs I have to let the mugs dry a bit with handles upside down so they maintain the shape I want. I thumb spot (thumb rest) every mug as well. Its one of my signature things
    When you make 100-200 mugs a week you need use processes that work well and fast.
    You also need to keep in mind I make my living with clay and time is very important to me.Hence when you work with 60 mugs every day you learn to pick it up a notch.
    Mark
  25. Like
    Mug reacted to Chilly in Handles   
    I watched a video of slip-casting mugs at Emma Bridgewater (a pottery in Stoke-on-Trent) and they put a "former" of some kind in the top of their mugs while drying.  I'll have a look, see if I can find it again.  ha ha...........
     
    Edit:  Found it, only took 9 minutes.     From 1:50 onwards.   
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