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laughlin

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  1. Like
    laughlin reacted to oldlady in Learning To Use Colored Slip...help   
    mermoose, your message to me mentioned my avatar. thank you for your kind words.  i have been using colored slips since 1972.  it is a very wonderful substance for decorating pottery. it is one of potters'  favorite methods and has been used for centuries all over the world. 
     
    slip is simply very wet clay.  the kind of clay you are using to make the pot will make slip.  just keep the trimmings of your pots dry and save enough to fill a container.  add some to water.  let that container sit overnight to thicken.  you can add color to the wet clay and cover the pot or part of the pot with this wet clay and let it dry.  if you brush this slip onto your wet pot,  you have simply thickened the clay that will become the pot by a layer of additional clay that contains color. it becomes part of the pot, not something additional that might need an adjustment in chemicals.  keep it simple. 
     
    this works so easily that there is probably no reason to add other ingredients.  if the clay you use normally is very grainy, you might choose to screen out the large grains before applying the slip.  i used to use this kind of clay but do not anymore.
     
    since the slip is simply wet clay, the time to use it is immediately after throwing when you can see the shine of water just leaving the pot you have made.  it can be added later by dampening the pot so it is in a condition to receive the wet clay but it is much simpler to do it when the pot is in the correct condition.  putting pots inside plastic bags and keeping them damp works to preserve the correct condition until you are ready to carve later. 
     
    there are many tools and ways to carve through the new layer of color into the underlying clay, the part you formed into the pot.  when you finish your design and let the pot dry totally, you will see that there is a difference between the clay of the pot and the colored covering you put on the outside.  a transparent or translucent glaze will allow this difference to be seen and admired.
     
    this is a very simplified version of how to use slip, colored or not.  there are infinite possibilities for the use of slip.  one of the very best books for a newcomer to this style of work is a very old one written by Charles Counts.  it is called Pottery Workshop.  it is not perfect, some glaze recipes have errors in them but it contains basic knowledge that is of value to beginners.
     
    if you will S T U D Y this simple book with its progression from how to throw a simple small cylinder to the final decoration of all the styles of pots shown, you will have enough knowledge to take you in any direction you want to go.
     
    you tube is a valuable tool.  but you need a foundation of knowledge to use any tool well.  please start at the beginning, you will find it a better way to proceed.
  2. Like
    laughlin reacted to oldlady in Learning To Use Colored Slip...help   
    on youtube, look for Dale  Baucum pottery and see the demo for bamboo tools.  done 4 years ago.  look at the baucum website for inspiration.       gorgeous.............
  3. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from Rae Reich in This clay?   
    Right - I also think those aren't thrown and figured on hand building my version in any case.  I've made similar forms and that part shouldn't be hard.  I think it'll be fun, too. I've been hand building with Coleman's porcelain for the past year - I love it and have managed some pretty challenging-for-me figural and other delicate stuff,  but it'll be nice to have something staunch and gnarly and less like toothpaste in my hands for a change if I can make it work.  Just googled Rimas - he has some really interesting surfaces going there!  I'm away from home and planning the summer, making a divers list of grits and crumbs. Thanks!
  4. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from Rae Reich in This clay?   
    Good idea, thanks! I know his name from my teaware-obsessed days.
  5. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from Rae Reich in This clay?   
    Sawdust... will try that too. How about irregular big feldspar? I have a (purchased) yunomi with that treatment but the little 'lumps' are oddly very regular, roundish and discrete looking.  I've never altered a clay body before so this will be interesting.  I def know how to overwork and overwater a thing until it's very rough at the edges,  I'll try to turn that fault to an advantage.   Worried about the sculptural clay - I did try some Soldate somewhere along the line and it could barely be bent into a cylinder (slab building). Ended up making boxes.
  6. Like
    laughlin reacted to oldlady in ^5 clay   
    lee, i did this last year with a rock of  Frost porcelain.  my problem was that i forgot about it and left it for months while i was gone.  i came back to a bag of clay soup.  
  7. Like
    laughlin reacted to ninadebarro in Translucent Procelain For Handbuilding ?   
    That sounds really neat, do you have a pic of it?
  8. Like
    laughlin reacted to Sputty in How did they do this ?   
    .
  9. Like
    laughlin reacted to The Duck Barn Artisan in Commercial glaze on red clay   
    Hi,
    I am UK based. I generally use a buff clay ( C108) but occasionally use Terracotta. I have used the same glazes on terracotta and yes there is a remarkable difference in colour if no under glaze or slip used. The brighter colors tend to be more muted but has interesting results.  If you are not sure about glazing the piece in question then I would make a smaller version and test glaze  this piece, this would be OK if time is not an issue. 
    The picture is of one of my hand built tea light holders, Nagar The MuzzleNozzler,  she was glazed with Terracolor Blue grass over laid with Dunlop Envision glaze- Down Right White. The base was Terracolor  Tigers eye satin. You can see that the blue grass has been muted by the terracotta clay as this would be a much greeny blue colour.  

  10. Like
    laughlin reacted to yedrow in Best Table for the Studio?   
    I've been using hardiboard for the top of my table for the last few months. It isn't plaster, but it works pretty good.
     
    Joel.
  11. Like
    laughlin reacted to Jacqueline in Best Table for the Studio?   
    There is a great product that I use in my studio. It is a fiber cement product called Hardi Board. It comes in large sheets and makes a great table top for wedging and working with slabs. Stacking several makes it even more absorbant for wedging. I even bought a bundle of their 'shingles' for small projects and ware boards. It is absorbant, very strong and can take the sharp edges of pin tools without damage.
  12. Like
    laughlin reacted to Gabby in Commercial glaze on red clay   
    Laughlin, if I were not such an awful photographer, I would send you a photo of a cup I did using Seaweed on red clay. I think it looks really gorgeous and kind of like you would guess on red.  It's obviously much darker than on white, with the brown undertones enhanced.
    Blue Midnight looks very similar on red as on white.
    Tourmaline looks much less green than on white, highlighting the turquoise aspect.
    Smokey merlot looks more violet than it does on white. Toasted sage for me looks pretty much the same on the two, which I would not have expected.
    Chun plum looks less tomato and more deep pink.
    Saturation gold looks bronze. 
  13. Like
    laughlin reacted to Bette in Commercial glaze on red clay   
    I use IMCO's Navajo Wheel, a ^6 dark red clay.  Some of the best commercial glazes that I have  found retain strong color (although generally darker of course than shown in catalogues):
    Georgie's: Ohata, Nassau Blue
    Clayscapes: Coastal Blue, Cream
    Coyote: Shino, Oatmeal, Espresso, Sedona Sunset
    Laguna: Almond Spice
    Amoco: Deep Firebrick, Deep Olive Speckle
    I too wish commercial glaze makers would show their glazes on dark red clay as well as the usual whitish clay.  Clayscapes does this on their website and I really appreciate it! Georgies has a board of test tiles with their glazes on dark red clay in their Portland store, but I have not yet seen this online or in their catalogue.
    I'd love to learn others' experience too.
  14. Like
    laughlin reacted to douglas in Underglaze wash on top of bisqued underglaze?   
    Another approach to aging the handle is to take a walk outside with some sand paper and an x-acto knife and scratch and sand away some of the under glaze.  Use fine sand paper at the end to get rid of any jagged spots. You can still add a wash to this afterwards if it needs it.
  15. Like
    laughlin reacted to Lucille Oka in Amaco Ancient Jasper Question   
    Okay here is a nice little video I found on YouTube 'JanicethePotter' shows her firing results for some commercial glazes not Ancient Jasper but others.
     

     
    I hope it works. I hope it encourages.
  16. Like
    laughlin reacted to Pres in Glaze Is Grainy, Rough At Lip Of Mugs   
    Sorry folks , but I really have to say something as I am rolling in laughter here. Isn't it intersting how the insertion of an "e" can change the whole meaninng of a post.
  17. Like
    laughlin reacted to oldlady in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    roberta, that is where i got mine.  there are 5 shown in the ad but you only get the one size,  00.  the auto parts store is a dollar less and they have a choice of sizes.
    edit..  i took back the small one i bought at the parts store and ordered the biggest one they have, about 3/4 inch wide.  it was $2 more and well worth it.
  18. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from andros in Ways To Make Square Forms\Urns   
    You might like this method too, nancy lee, since you like hand building. It's done with soft slabs so you can easily form a soft square or a cylinder - it's easy  once you get the hang of it. Here's Liz Zlot's directions - if you image-google her work you can see different ways that she uses the same principle.  https://ceramicartsnetwork.org/daily/pottery-making-techniques/handbuilding-techniques/how-to-slab-build-a-simple-darted-cup/ .  
  19. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from Pres in Mug dimensions   
    Well, whoever did, thanks. And yeah, so far this volume one gives very funky results for inches/centimeters. They don't tell you what unit of measurement they want.  But I'll figure it out, it's a cool gadget. I know the standard sizes for the volume I like -  just fooling around with proportions, which brings the issue of volume up again. 
    And best to you, too, Pres. 
  20. Like
    laughlin reacted to Marcia Selsor in Porcelain Survey   
    1. What are the properties that you dislike the most.I like the smoothness while throwing and the forms achieve
    as well as the memory of surfaces.
    d.the price
     
     
    2. What properties do you find most beneficial.
    the forms I can achieve
     
    3. How important is translucency or whiteness? When I fire to the maturity of the clay it is important. When I fire Alternative Firings, the smooth surfaced after burnishing is important.
     
    4. Would you make larger pieces if the clay had the mechanical strength? The strength failed during a recent wood firing to ^10+ and stacked on side. Normal positions are fine. I sometimes torch the clay while forming to give it strength.
     
    5. What cone do you fire to the most?
    06, 6, and on occasion 10
     
    6. What properties do you wish porcelain had? self forming at my command
     
    7. Do you throw, press, hand build, etc?
    throw, press, slump, handbuild.
     
    I love Coleman Porcelain. Just got some Nara or Nora porcelain. So far I like it.


  21. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from Stephen in Whats In A Name   
    I just never use my full name online unless absolutely required or for business transactions, and Facebook. It's nothing to do with accountability; I'm a retired psychotherapist and maintaining some online privacy is just sensible. It's more a habit now, but I think it also adds a little bit of a hedge against online harassment - not that I'd expect that sort of thing here. But it does happen - I had an acquaintance who got involved in an escalating dispute in a previously benign forum. She'd used her real name and had also shared her email with another, who shared it in turn, and she ended up receiving a lot of unwelcome attention outside the forum. I'm not overanxious or very consistent about it though - I posted my Pinterest URL in a thread here somewhere, and I use my real name there.
     
    If some of you didn't use your real names it'd be an awful shame, too - how would I have discovered Chris Campbell's absolutely wonderful blog otherwise? (Thanks for that, Chris!)
     
    That said, I didn't intend to do more than lurk here  - I just tossed my mother's maiden name in. I still very rarely post, but it looks so nekkid and chilly up there. I could at least have come up with something with personality, right?
    Something fitting - WobblePot, or Princess Cracksalot, or WarpSpeed, or, as of this morning, ItWasGoingToBeARabbit. 
  22. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in What Happened To The Guy Who Wanted................   
    I'm a lurker here, a ceramic beginner, and almost never post because I've found that an archive search almost always yields excellent discussion and good advice about whatever I'm wondering about - it's fairly encylopedic. Reading these posts I'm thinking that a very warm thank you is owed to everyone who has so generously taken the time to post help here over the years. So here it is - HUGE thanks from a rank beginner!
     
    That said, I'm sure I'm not alone in using this forum as a welcome resource rather than joining it as an interactive community. I used to be an enthusiastic participant in several online communities (non-ceramic-related ones), but have avoided that since one went south in miserable flames and others divided into silly, unkind factions and so on. That's not happened here, a very good thing!
     
    It makes perfect sense to me that people feel un-thanked and resentful when they take the time to respond to questions and never receive any feedback. Frustratingly curious, too, to the extent that they've become genuinely interested in another's progress. At the same time, I'm not sure that it's willful rudeness that allows people to query and disappear when they have their answer.
     
    Many people really don't want the perks and the hassles of deep involvement with an online community (uploading pics, becoming familiar, being frequently interactive and "known", etc., or even participating in sustained conversations) for perfectly OK reasons, I think. They'll enter this forum in the way that someone might call Amaco to ask about a glaze - simply to obtain useful information. Whatever answer is posted enters a public database that will be useful for many more people. That can be felt as a kind of exploitation, but it's definitely an inevitable and I think deeply valuable function of the best online forums.
     
    The way I resolved this issue for myself when I encountered it in forums in which I was active in giving advice (in territories where I had some expertise) was by thanking myself warmly for contributing to many unknown others via an invaluable public database. Every really good forum has a somewhat close-knit "heart" and, in my humble opinion, some tolerance for non-disruptive "drop-ins" and lurkers who make off with valuable help with never a look back. Closed online communities avoid this, but tend to become kind of involuted and unable to replace lost membership. Someone here said it was like being an unpaid consultant. It really is, but - and I'm offering this humbly - it might be more heartening to think of it as a willing volunteer service to the ceramics community at large.  Maybe not, but it's a optional way to frame this and makes for a happier mind.
     
    And THAT said, it would take a whole page to thank by name the community members who have posted answers to questions asked by others in here that have been of immense help to me. Gratitude, again, to you all.
  23. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from AndreaB in What Happened To The Guy Who Wanted................   
    I'm a lurker here, a ceramic beginner, and almost never post because I've found that an archive search almost always yields excellent discussion and good advice about whatever I'm wondering about - it's fairly encylopedic. Reading these posts I'm thinking that a very warm thank you is owed to everyone who has so generously taken the time to post help here over the years. So here it is - HUGE thanks from a rank beginner!
     
    That said, I'm sure I'm not alone in using this forum as a welcome resource rather than joining it as an interactive community. I used to be an enthusiastic participant in several online communities (non-ceramic-related ones), but have avoided that since one went south in miserable flames and others divided into silly, unkind factions and so on. That's not happened here, a very good thing!
     
    It makes perfect sense to me that people feel un-thanked and resentful when they take the time to respond to questions and never receive any feedback. Frustratingly curious, too, to the extent that they've become genuinely interested in another's progress. At the same time, I'm not sure that it's willful rudeness that allows people to query and disappear when they have their answer.
     
    Many people really don't want the perks and the hassles of deep involvement with an online community (uploading pics, becoming familiar, being frequently interactive and "known", etc., or even participating in sustained conversations) for perfectly OK reasons, I think. They'll enter this forum in the way that someone might call Amaco to ask about a glaze - simply to obtain useful information. Whatever answer is posted enters a public database that will be useful for many more people. That can be felt as a kind of exploitation, but it's definitely an inevitable and I think deeply valuable function of the best online forums.
     
    The way I resolved this issue for myself when I encountered it in forums in which I was active in giving advice (in territories where I had some expertise) was by thanking myself warmly for contributing to many unknown others via an invaluable public database. Every really good forum has a somewhat close-knit "heart" and, in my humble opinion, some tolerance for non-disruptive "drop-ins" and lurkers who make off with valuable help with never a look back. Closed online communities avoid this, but tend to become kind of involuted and unable to replace lost membership. Someone here said it was like being an unpaid consultant. It really is, but - and I'm offering this humbly - it might be more heartening to think of it as a willing volunteer service to the ceramics community at large.  Maybe not, but it's a optional way to frame this and makes for a happier mind.
     
    And THAT said, it would take a whole page to thank by name the community members who have posted answers to questions asked by others in here that have been of immense help to me. Gratitude, again, to you all.
  24. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from flowerdry in What Happened To The Guy Who Wanted................   
    I'm a lurker here, a ceramic beginner, and almost never post because I've found that an archive search almost always yields excellent discussion and good advice about whatever I'm wondering about - it's fairly encylopedic. Reading these posts I'm thinking that a very warm thank you is owed to everyone who has so generously taken the time to post help here over the years. So here it is - HUGE thanks from a rank beginner!
     
    That said, I'm sure I'm not alone in using this forum as a welcome resource rather than joining it as an interactive community. I used to be an enthusiastic participant in several online communities (non-ceramic-related ones), but have avoided that since one went south in miserable flames and others divided into silly, unkind factions and so on. That's not happened here, a very good thing!
     
    It makes perfect sense to me that people feel un-thanked and resentful when they take the time to respond to questions and never receive any feedback. Frustratingly curious, too, to the extent that they've become genuinely interested in another's progress. At the same time, I'm not sure that it's willful rudeness that allows people to query and disappear when they have their answer.
     
    Many people really don't want the perks and the hassles of deep involvement with an online community (uploading pics, becoming familiar, being frequently interactive and "known", etc., or even participating in sustained conversations) for perfectly OK reasons, I think. They'll enter this forum in the way that someone might call Amaco to ask about a glaze - simply to obtain useful information. Whatever answer is posted enters a public database that will be useful for many more people. That can be felt as a kind of exploitation, but it's definitely an inevitable and I think deeply valuable function of the best online forums.
     
    The way I resolved this issue for myself when I encountered it in forums in which I was active in giving advice (in territories where I had some expertise) was by thanking myself warmly for contributing to many unknown others via an invaluable public database. Every really good forum has a somewhat close-knit "heart" and, in my humble opinion, some tolerance for non-disruptive "drop-ins" and lurkers who make off with valuable help with never a look back. Closed online communities avoid this, but tend to become kind of involuted and unable to replace lost membership. Someone here said it was like being an unpaid consultant. It really is, but - and I'm offering this humbly - it might be more heartening to think of it as a willing volunteer service to the ceramics community at large.  Maybe not, but it's a optional way to frame this and makes for a happier mind.
     
    And THAT said, it would take a whole page to thank by name the community members who have posted answers to questions asked by others in here that have been of immense help to me. Gratitude, again, to you all.
  25. Like
    laughlin got a reaction from Mudslinger Ceramics in What Happened To The Guy Who Wanted................   
    I'm a lurker here, a ceramic beginner, and almost never post because I've found that an archive search almost always yields excellent discussion and good advice about whatever I'm wondering about - it's fairly encylopedic. Reading these posts I'm thinking that a very warm thank you is owed to everyone who has so generously taken the time to post help here over the years. So here it is - HUGE thanks from a rank beginner!
     
    That said, I'm sure I'm not alone in using this forum as a welcome resource rather than joining it as an interactive community. I used to be an enthusiastic participant in several online communities (non-ceramic-related ones), but have avoided that since one went south in miserable flames and others divided into silly, unkind factions and so on. That's not happened here, a very good thing!
     
    It makes perfect sense to me that people feel un-thanked and resentful when they take the time to respond to questions and never receive any feedback. Frustratingly curious, too, to the extent that they've become genuinely interested in another's progress. At the same time, I'm not sure that it's willful rudeness that allows people to query and disappear when they have their answer.
     
    Many people really don't want the perks and the hassles of deep involvement with an online community (uploading pics, becoming familiar, being frequently interactive and "known", etc., or even participating in sustained conversations) for perfectly OK reasons, I think. They'll enter this forum in the way that someone might call Amaco to ask about a glaze - simply to obtain useful information. Whatever answer is posted enters a public database that will be useful for many more people. That can be felt as a kind of exploitation, but it's definitely an inevitable and I think deeply valuable function of the best online forums.
     
    The way I resolved this issue for myself when I encountered it in forums in which I was active in giving advice (in territories where I had some expertise) was by thanking myself warmly for contributing to many unknown others via an invaluable public database. Every really good forum has a somewhat close-knit "heart" and, in my humble opinion, some tolerance for non-disruptive "drop-ins" and lurkers who make off with valuable help with never a look back. Closed online communities avoid this, but tend to become kind of involuted and unable to replace lost membership. Someone here said it was like being an unpaid consultant. It really is, but - and I'm offering this humbly - it might be more heartening to think of it as a willing volunteer service to the ceramics community at large.  Maybe not, but it's a optional way to frame this and makes for a happier mind.
     
    And THAT said, it would take a whole page to thank by name the community members who have posted answers to questions asked by others in here that have been of immense help to me. Gratitude, again, to you all.
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