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Bobg

Is There A Way To Make A Glossy Glaze Satin?

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The vast majority of my pottery is glazed glossy, but occasionally I have someone wanting a satin finish. I don't see it being worthwhile to buy a satin glaze to make it cost effective. If I glaze a piece with glossy glaze is there something I can put over the glaze to make it satiny or at least cut the shine some?

 

 

Thanks,

Bobg

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I think one way you might try is by firing down your kiln if possible. If I remember right, letting it cool by itself, rather quickly(?) gives you a higher gloss than firing down. Maybe I have it backwards, it's been so long since I've done it, we just let our kiln temp drift down by itself.

Of course, you have to want ALL your glossy pieces to come out that way.

If you are making just decorative or sculptural work, you could apply one of the satin polyuretanes to the pieces.

Anyhoo, slower cooling might give a more satiny/matte finish. I'm sure someone else could verify.

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The vast majority of my pottery is glazed glossy, but occasionally I have someone wanting a satin finish. I don't see it being worthwhile to buy a satin glaze to make it cost effective. If I glaze a piece with glossy glaze is there something I can put over the glaze to make it satiny or at least cut the shine some?

 

 

Thanks,

Bobg

 

 

 

Some glazes can be mixed together to create a satin glaze. If you have two glazes, one gloss and one matt, by the same manufacturer, within the same series, the mix should work. But call the manufacturer and ask 'if you mix the two glazes together will it alter the formula in any way other than appearance?' That is, if either will add lead or other toxic chemicals and will you have to change the firing method. Whatever the manufacturer tells you to do be sure to test it using small amounts of the products.

 

 

 

 

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The surface characteristic is based on the silica to alumina ratio. The melting temp is determined more by the fluxes. If you decreased your silica content by a 1 percentage point it will start to be more matt. You can play around with the ratios.you could try some glaze programs for doing this.

 

Marcia

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