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Hakeme Slip Recipe

slip hakeme

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#21 Babs

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 07:35 PM

My head is dutifully hung in shame and awe! Anyone ever called you guys anal??? :D  :lol:

i will now, having selected my vegetation, rise to the challenge of the above. A goal for 2015

Great stuff people.



#22 Susan.h

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Posted 21 December 2015 - 04:10 PM

My Hakeme brush and results. Brush is made with jute twine. I hot glued a few strands to get the scratching effect.
Aloha, Ken

@rakuken, i love the teabowl you posted above. I know this is a little after the fact but can you share some technical information? I'm wondering about clay body, slip content, firing mode, cover glaze. I'm experimenting with a dark clay ( Aardvaark Black Mountain) and white slip, so far the clay comes out only tan under the cover glaze. I'd sur like to get more contrast between clay and slip.
I just joined CAD so this is my first post.

#23 curt

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Posted 22 December 2015 - 08:29 PM

While I am no hakame guru, my limited experience tells me the key as John said is in the clay body. The gnarlier the better, with plenty of iron and junk to spot up the covering slip. The vase below used a fairly tame brush which didn't leave much if any gouging in the clay body. I think the heavy iron content in the clay added some fluxing power which helped the slip stick on. The liberal use of ash glazes on much (but not all) of the pot may also have assisted.
 
Hakeme Vase

 



#24 Susan.h

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Posted 22 December 2015 - 10:23 PM

While I am no hakame guru, my limited experience tells me the key as John said is in the clay body. The gnarlier the better, with plenty of iron and junk to spot up the covering slip. The vase below used a fairly tame brush which didn't leave much if any gouging in the clay body. I think the heavy iron content in the clay added some fluxing power which helped the slip stick on. The liberal use of ash glazes on much (but not all) of the pot may also have assisted.


Thanks curt - that vase is sweet. I am confined to electric unfortunately, I suspect you are gas or wood firing? I have a nice ash glaze that is surprisingly non-electric looking, I'll experiment with that. Thanks so much for your response.

#25 curt

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Posted 23 December 2015 - 07:04 PM

Hi Susan, thanks! Yes that vase was fired in a mains gas kiln with heavy reduction. That said, I think ash glazes on their own often look better in electric.





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