Jump to content


Photo

Hakeme Slip Recipe

slip hakeme

  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#21 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,077 posts

Posted 20 July 2014 - 07:35 PM

My head is dutifully hung in shame and awe! Anyone ever called you guys anal??? :D  :lol:

i will now, having selected my vegetation, rise to the challenge of the above. A goal for 2015

Great stuff people.



#22 Susan.h

Susan.h

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 21 December 2015 - 04:10 PM

My Hakeme brush and results. Brush is made with jute twine. I hot glued a few strands to get the scratching effect.
Aloha, Ken

@rakuken, i love the teabowl you posted above. I know this is a little after the fact but can you share some technical information? I'm wondering about clay body, slip content, firing mode, cover glaze. I'm experimenting with a dark clay ( Aardvaark Black Mountain) and white slip, so far the clay comes out only tan under the cover glaze. I'd sur like to get more contrast between clay and slip.
I just joined CAD so this is my first post.

#23 curt

curt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 336 posts
  • LocationWestern Australia

Posted 22 December 2015 - 08:29 PM

While I am no hakame guru, my limited experience tells me the key as John said is in the clay body. The gnarlier the better, with plenty of iron and junk to spot up the covering slip. The vase below used a fairly tame brush which didn't leave much if any gouging in the clay body. I think the heavy iron content in the clay added some fluxing power which helped the slip stick on. The liberal use of ash glazes on much (but not all) of the pot may also have assisted.
 
Hakeme Vase

 



#24 Susan.h

Susan.h

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 22 December 2015 - 10:23 PM

While I am no hakame guru, my limited experience tells me the key as John said is in the clay body. The gnarlier the better, with plenty of iron and junk to spot up the covering slip. The vase below used a fairly tame brush which didn't leave much if any gouging in the clay body. I think the heavy iron content in the clay added some fluxing power which helped the slip stick on. The liberal use of ash glazes on much (but not all) of the pot may also have assisted.


Thanks curt - that vase is sweet. I am confined to electric unfortunately, I suspect you are gas or wood firing? I have a nice ash glaze that is surprisingly non-electric looking, I'll experiment with that. Thanks so much for your response.

#25 curt

curt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 336 posts
  • LocationWestern Australia

Posted 23 December 2015 - 07:04 PM

Hi Susan, thanks! Yes that vase was fired in a mains gas kiln with heavy reduction. That said, I think ash glazes on their own often look better in electric.

#26 saidjake

saidjake

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 05 May 2017 - 01:04 PM

Babs,

 

The "recipe" for Hakeme slips I have from being in Japan and Korea (south) are basically anything from 100% of a specific kaolin-type clay....... to about 80% of a specific kaolin-type clay and 20% of a feldspathic type rock.  Not much more than that.

 

One aspect of the success of this is the really coarse nature of the clay bodys UNDER the slip.... very unlike our dense fine particled highly plastic western clay bodies.

 

But the real key is the BRUSH used.

 

Put many of those slips on with a fine nice quality bruish... and they flake right off the body as it drys.  The key is that the coarse rough brush causes impressions into the underlying clay body... that makes the two different wet to dry shrinkage materials stay together.

 

My best Hakeme brush I made while working in Japan with the bristles from an old used natural fiber broom, some string to bind them, and a piece of rope to bind over the string to make more of a gripping handle.

 

The clay underneath the slip has to be wet enough that the stiff bristles dig into it a little.  Then it has to be applied in a fast direct move.  No "redos".

 

best,

 

......................john

Thanks, John.  Can you elaborate on "specific type of kaolin?"



#27 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,307 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 05 May 2017 - 10:22 PM

 

Babs,

 

The "recipe" for Hakeme slips I have from being in Japan and Korea (south) are basically anything from 100% of a specific kaolin-type clay....... to about 80% of a specific kaolin-type clay and 20% of a feldspathic type rock.  Not much more than that.

 

One aspect of the success of this is the really coarse nature of the clay bodys UNDER the slip.... very unlike our dense fine particled highly plastic western clay bodies.

 

But the real key is the BRUSH used.

 

Put many of those slips on with a fine nice quality bruish... and they flake right off the body as it drys.  The key is that the coarse rough brush causes impressions into the underlying clay body... that makes the two different wet to dry shrinkage materials stay together.

 

My best Hakeme brush I made while working in Japan with the bristles from an old used natural fiber broom, some string to bind them, and a piece of rope to bind over the string to make more of a gripping handle.

 

The clay underneath the slip has to be wet enough that the stiff bristles dig into it a little.  Then it has to be applied in a fast direct move.  No "redos".

 

best,

 

......................john

Thanks, John.  Can you elaborate on "specific type of kaolin?"

 

 

 

That just means the kaolin type clay from "Location A".  Typically the physically closest source to the potter in question.  Nothing "cosmic" here.  Most potters in Japan and Korea use the materials that are pretty local to them.  The US "supermarket society" approach to worldwide ceramic raw materials is a luxury.

 

best,

 

....................john


John Baymore
Adjunct Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Former Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

http://www.nhia.edu/...ty/john-baymore


#28 preeta

preeta

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 354 posts
  • LocationSacramento, California

Posted 06 May 2017 - 11:17 AM

aaah john i had no idea the texture of the clay below mattered. no wonder i wasn't getting the texture i wanted.

 

i also played with the thickness of slip. i am still trying to figure that out.


"Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go." T.S. Eliot






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: slip, hakeme

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users