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  1. I search on the forum but did not find an answer to this. It possible to brush porcelain slip on white stoneware (on leather hard, like Hakeme, but covering the body completely), or would the shrinkage difference cause the porcelain to flake off? Thanks a lot! Lucia
  2. Hi all, Currently I work with mid-fire slip and glaze my work 'traditionally' to achieve quite muted, natural tones. I'm thinking about making some wares that I want to be BRIGHT and flat in colour - like popping, primary colours. I'm wondering what the best way to achieve this level of colour would be? In my experience using stains in glazes never seems to achieve the flatness I'm after. I would suspect a coloured slip might be the answer but again using stains only seems to result in pastels - what is the average ratio of stain to slip to achieve a full bodied red for example? Or would I paint the work all over with an underglaze? Or something else. All suggestions appreciated!
  3. I am interested in Your input... I want to tile my bathroom myself, using tiles I created with molds. So the tiles created MUST be WATER PROOF! Firing the green ware using a home kiln, using my 110v house hold run wiring. Finally after firing to bisque, glazing to fire. I live in a townhouse so extra venting or drilling is not possible. I know this venture is going to take forever unless Covid takes me. What kind of kiln? How and why. I use to help my mom when she use to do ceramics. Way back with cones and giant kilns. So not what I want nor need
  4. Hi guys. I`ve purchased some Underglaze powder pigments. In description is written that I can mix it with water to use like an underglaze. I mixed it with water (5g powder to 10ml water; 5g -15 ml; 5g - 20ml) and draw to bisque pots. After it dries, color is easily removable with friction. I mean, if i touch paint, it comes off. Then I mixed 5g powder to 5g clay and 20 ml water. Difference was clear. Color was well balanced and it was not easily removable. So basically, in first method, I`m mixing water and powder, in second method Slip and powder. I wonder, is any of this method wrong or right? I can`t test them with firing right away so any basic info would help me.
  5. I have a 50lb bag of Laguna Glacier casting slip. I'm not interested in casting this porcelain (bought it for another experiment that I now abandoned). So I decided to try mixing it to use as engobe for the interior of pots made of dark clays. Mixed per instructions I found on the *Internet*: 50lb of dry mix per 3 Gal of water to get 5 Gal of slip, and add some Darvan to deflocculate. Since I'm only testing it for now, I mixed a smaller batch: 10lb to 2.27L and added 4 drops of Darvan. The slip I got is very thick, the consistency of pudding almost. Not sure what the reason is. Might be my Darvan is too old? I think the jar I have is at least 2 years old. This consistency is definitely not suitable for pouring into a pot and then pouring out. What would you do? Add more water? Try to deflocculate further?
  6. HELP ..... ... Trying to get back to ceramics .I’ve just finished mixing a small quantity batch of stains and underglazes with slip ( same clay bodies nothing else ) I’ve used 60 % slip to the ratio of about 10% stain to both stain and underglazes But have found that the underglaze slips are much thinner than the stain slips .Consistencies are different .Most stains seems to be thicker than underglazes Aside from black and purple which are def thinner . How to rectify ......???? Do I add more slip or stain to thicken ??? Or is it more complicated than I imagine . ? Bare in mind I am not adding anything else ie frits etc Thank you Nicky
  7. If someone could please help me by simplifying the differences for me between “ slip , engobes and underglazes “ I use both porcelain and stoneware . And fire in an electric kiln 1) Slip is used mixing same clay body with stain and water . And applied to leatherhard only . (what other are ingredients could be used in stains for different surface effects ?) 2) Engobes are used only on leatherhard (?) 3)Underglazes can be used both on leatherhard and bisque (?) . Thank you so much Nicky
  8. Hello everyone, this is my first time on the forum, so glad I found you all. I wonder if anyone can help me with my slipcasting problem? I have made a narrow (4cm) and tall (26cm) cylinder mould and although the first cast came out satisfactory, the next three have came out the mould with the bases ‘sucked’ in/imploded. Could it be that the opening to the mould is too narrow to drain the slip? Or could my slip be too thick? When I cut into the cast it was still filled with slip about a quarter of the way up the form. If my slip is too thick, could I add a little water to thin it down? Many thanks in advance for your advice. Laura
  9. I am new to ceramics and can't seem to find any info on creating a strong white slip for decoration, not casting.Porcelain clay , I guess would be the optimum. If so how please? Powder ?...dried clay rewetted? Plus any additions? How would this work as far as compatability goes with stoneware clays? Also I would like to make an engobe white to use on bisque...any ideas please ?
  10. Would someone care to explain why slip recipes always say to begin with bone dry clay? Is that somehow better (or the end result different) than using wet clay. Its as if the instructions for boiling water said "First take some ice cubes ....."
  11. Dear all This is my first post here, having been a lurking reader for a while. I would like to suspend some coarse particulates in a porcelain slip. I am intrigued by the coarse feldspar inclusions in some Japanese wood fired pottery. I have tried adding coarse inclusions in a porcelain body, which fired well but the large chunks got in the way of my preferred style of handbuilding and surforming the surface. I now want to try to add these particulates in a porcelain slip that I can apply to my pots by dipping. Does anyone have any tricks on how to suspend larger particulates in a clay slip, eg grog or coarse inclusions? Do grogged slips exist? I was thinking that perhaps adding bentonite could help due to its thixotropy, but I am not sure. Any help from this very helpful forum in my self-learning endeavors would be much appreciated Best Joris The Netherlands
  12. Hi clay folks! I'm a technician at my local studio and we want to switch to a new colored slip pallette for some of our lessons. We currently work with a 3-5% mason stain addition. I want to make a navy blue, forest green, dark red, and mustard yellow. If you've made these colors, which mason stains (#s) work well, and what percentages do you use them at to get a vibrant color? I'll totally play with line blends too, just thought I'd check if anyone has a good starting point! Lindsey
  13. From the album: Fun Fun Fun

    © Pottery by Penny

  14. Mudmann65

    Teapot

    From the album: Some work

    Slab built teapot with slip, "Otto's black slip". Green ware.
  15. From the album: Late 2015

    This is my best mug to date. The back has carvings, but it was impossible to photograph...well, for ME it was, haha! It probably holds 20oz, so it's a good size. I wanted to make a new mythology about how flowers grow... Terracotta with white slip and greenware-applied underglaze, fired to ^03.

    © Cavy Fire Studios

  16. From the album: narrative work

    I'm not really a cat person, but I chose to work with the basic shape because cats are far less variable in form than dogs and are thus more universally recognized, if that makes any sense. These images are developed using cut-out resists, colored slips, and sgraffito on porcelain.
  17. From the album: Work in Progress

    Three wheel thrown pieces made with Speckled Buff clay. The interiors are then painted with white stoneware slip and the outside is carved with grass and flowers.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015

  18. From the album: Wheel Thrown Work, 2015

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015

  19. From the album: Work in Progress

    Three wheel thrown pieces made with Speckled Buff clay. The interiors are then painted with white stoneware slip and the outside is carved with grass and flowers. Then underglaze is applied to the grass and white engobe to the flowers so the colors will show true.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015

  20. From the album: Early 2015

    Amaterasu Omikamisama. Redart with white slip and underglaze, ^03.

    © Sarah Alderete/Capcom

  21. From the album: Wheel Thrown Work, 2015

    I don't even want to talk about how long this took to make ... more a work of art than a production piece. But I enjoyed making it so much and this is the first piece I've ever made that came out even better than I imagined. I love everything about it (this never happens to me). I used white slip on the inside of the bowl and white engobe on the flowers so the colors would show true. It worked very well, but some of the little speckles showed through anyway, which I found completely charming.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015 All Rights Reserved

  22. From the album: newer work

    This is a one-piece hanging planter, a form I made in the hundreds, back in the day. The water catcher is thrown onto the bottom of the planter as a part of the trimming process. It's planted with aloe, and is a gift to my son the chef, who sometimes collects burns in the course of working.
  23. From the album: Early 2015

    Here he is, Mr. Inlé himself. I could not, for the LIFE of me, get a good photo of him. No picture I took does this piece any justice... he's one of my favorites. Terracotta with white slip, ^03. Holds 15oz.

    © Sarah Alderete/Richard Adams

  24. From the album: Early 2015

    I made this 20oz mug for my dad. :3 The rabbit's butt tattoo says "water." My pops lives on the Washington state coast, soI thought this would be perfect. Terracotta and white slip, ^03.

    © Sarah Alderete

  25. From the album: Early 2015

    Oh, man. This mug was such a beauty until I saw the dang spots where the glaze pickled on the inside and didn't fill in the bubble holes...hnngh. I didn't want to refire and risk the dragon's lines bleeding, and I couldn't BEAR to smash such a pretty mug, so I gave her to my fella. Terracotta with white slip, ^03.

    © Sarah Alderete

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