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Looking For Advice #porcelain

#proceline #kiln #chinapowder

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#1 wonderwoman

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 11:03 AM

I have recently come into possession of a blue diamond kiln (max temp 2300), and a lot of what I think is china powder paint. I am use to a regular high fire clay fired in a pit (wood fire). I have a little information on porcelain but I would like to know more. I normally hand build but I do have a kick wheel i use. I would like any information on firing porcelain in a kiln (max temp 2300), and using the powders I have, how to mix and what to fire at.  Would love to find a mentor. Comment or email please. Zoe026336@yahoo.com



#2 Biglou13

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 10:28 PM

Please clarify what "powders" you have? Please clarify at least what kind of porcelaineous clay that you have?
What is "china powder paint".
Are you looking to make clay? I have had recent success with formulating and making porcelain based clay bodies.
A possible (simple). porcelain clay formula will need 1. Porcelain clay 2. Ball clay 3. Silica 4. Feldspar. (5. Bentonite for plasticity)
Without a known porcelain clay it's a up hill battle..
More info please.
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#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 08:28 PM

I wouldn't bother firing to ^10. Start using ^6. China painting is very low temps and is applied onto fired glaze ware.

#4 neilestrick

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 10:37 AM

Porcelain is different in that the greenware is fired at a high temperature, which requires the use of plate-sitters and other supports as the porcelain becomes very plastic as it vitrifies.  Porcelain is then glazed and fired to a much lower temperature.

 

 

Yes, for industrial/commercial porcelain. But for the studio potter is is handled just like any other clay body- bisque at low fire temps, cone 06-04, then glaze at higher temp. Special supports and such are not needed. You can get cone 6 or cone 10 porcelain bodies from your regular clay supplier. I recommend working with cone 6, as cone 10 will wear out your kiln much faster. China paints are applied to pots that have already been glaze fired, then fired into place, usually at very low temps like cone 019.


Neil Estrick
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#5 neilestrick

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 06:37 PM

Yes, for that application I can see why Chris needs the setters. They are a very thin, wide bowl form, and don't appear to be footed (I may be wrong there). And for your bone china it may be necessary for certain forms, but bone china is a different animal than regular porcelain. Those are very specific situations. For most work with a grolleg or domestic porcelain, setters are not at all necessary. We go through thousands of pounds of porcelain every year in my studio for everything from tiny bowls and cups to sinks and 45 pound planters, and never use setters.


Neil Estrick
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Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com




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