Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Stained Glass And Pottery


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 pattial

pattial

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36 posts

Posted 02 October 2010 - 12:23 AM

I make stained glass but havnt made any since starting pottery...I know you can incorporate the two but I need instructions how to> can anyone help with detailed instructions?\\thanks

#2 wadar

wadar

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts

Posted 02 October 2010 - 08:09 AM

I make stained glass but havnt made any since starting pottery...I know you can incorporate the two but I need instructions how to> can anyone help with detailed instructions?\\thanks



#3 wadar

wadar

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts

Posted 02 October 2010 - 08:10 AM

I have used copper foil with good results. Thin walled vessels with a glossy glaze so the adhesive on the foil will stick while you're building. If you are doing glass inside an opening in your vessel, there is no chance of it coming loose if you fold the foil over the perimeter of the opening. It is then captive in the opening after soldering. If you want to do a lidded vessel, in order for the foil to remain in place, you need to create a small groove along both sides of the edge so that the foil is not depending on the adhesive to remain in place, but rather is formed over the edge and into the groove a bit to hold it in placeafter soldering. Best to use a wide foil for the perimeter and narrower foil for the glass.

#4 Seasoned Warrior

Seasoned Warrior

    Businessman - Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 298 posts

Posted 02 October 2010 - 12:19 PM

I have used copper foil with good results. Thin walled vessels with a glossy glaze so the adhesive on the foil will stick while you're building. If you are doing glass inside an opening in your vessel, there is no chance of it coming loose if you fold the foil over the perimeter of the opening. It is then captive in the opening after soldering. If you want to do a lidded vessel, in order for the foil to remain in place, you need to create a small groove along both sides of the edge so that the foil is not depending on the adhesive to remain in place, but rather is formed over the edge and into the groove a bit to hold it in placeafter soldering. Best to use a wide foil for the perimeter and narrower foil for the glass.


I like the suggestion sbout the groove. Several years ago a friend gave me a ceramic oil lamp of an unusual design but the brass lamp fittings were attached to the ceramic base with a hot melt glue. It was fine until I decided to fill it with kerosene in case of one of our infamous power outages (some of which last up to ten days). I needed to use it one day and took the lamp off the shelf and the lamp parts and the chimney fell off, the kerosene had broken the bond between the ceramic and the brass. I'm just glad it didn't happen while the lamp was lit. Mechanical attachment would have prevented this from happening. I now only use it for decoration. One of the contributing factors to the lack of bond was that the manufacturer tried to bond the brass lamp part to the lip which was glazed.

Recently I made a ceramic alembic for use in extracting essential oils. One of the problems i had was attaching a copper gooseneck to the ceramic top of the alembic and I did it with a two part machined piece of brass that screwed into the tapered alembic causing a compression seal which was sealed with a bit of EPDM I had laying around.

Regards,
Charles




#5 van

van

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts

Posted 02 October 2010 - 07:02 PM


I have used copper foil with good results. Thin walled vessels with a glossy glaze so the adhesive on the foil will stick while you're building. If you are doing glass inside an opening in your vessel, there is no chance of it coming loose if you fold the foil over the perimeter of the opening. It is then captive in the opening after soldering. If you want to do a lidded vessel, in order for the foil to remain in place, you need to create a small groove along both sides of the edge so that the foil is not depending on the adhesive to remain in place, but rather is formed over the edge and into the groove a bit to hold it in placeafter soldering. Best to use a wide foil for the perimeter and narrower foil for the glass.


I like the suggestion sbout the groove. Several years ago a friend gave me a ceramic oil lamp of an unusual design but the brass lamp fittings were attached to the ceramic base with a hot melt glue. It was fine until I decided to fill it with kerosene in case of one of our infamous power outages (some of which last up to ten days). I needed to use it one day and took the lamp off the shelf and the lamp parts and the chimney fell off, the kerosene had broken the bond between the ceramic and the brass. I'm just glad it didn't happen while the lamp was lit. Mechanical attachment would have prevented this from happening. I now only use it for decoration. One of the contributing factors to the lack of bond was that the manufacturer tried to bond the brass lamp part to the lip which was glazed.

Recently I made a ceramic alembic for use in extracting essential oils. One of the problems i had was attaching a copper gooseneck to the ceramic top of the alembic and I did it with a two part machined piece of brass that screwed into the tapered alembic causing a compression seal which was sealed with a bit of EPDM I had laying around.

Regards,
Charles





#6 van

van

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts

Posted 02 October 2010 - 07:03 PM



I have used copper foil with good results. Thin walled vessels with a glossy glaze so the adhesive on the foil will stick while you're building. If you are doing glass inside an opening in your vessel, there is no chance of it coming loose if you fold the foil over the perimeter of the opening. It is then captive in the opening after soldering. If you want to do a lidded vessel, in order for the foil to remain in place, you need to create a small groove along both sides of the edge so that the foil is not depending on the adhesive to remain in place, but rather is formed over the edge and into the groove a bit to hold it in placeafter soldering. Best to use a wide foil for the perimeter and narrower foil for the glass.


I like the suggestion sbout the groove. Several years ago a friend gave me a ceramic oil lamp of an unusual design but the brass lamp fittings were attached to the ceramic base with a hot melt glue. It was fine until I decided to fill it with kerosene in case of one of our infamous power outages (some of which last up to ten days). I needed to use it one day and took the lamp off the shelf and the lamp parts and the chimney fell off, the kerosene had broken the bond between the ceramic and the brass. I'm just glad it didn't happen while the lamp was lit. Mechanical attachment would have prevented this from happening. I now only use it for decoration. One of the contributing factors to the lack of bond was that the manufacturer tried to bond the brass lamp part to the lip which was glazed.

Recently I made a ceramic alembic for use in extracting essential oils. One of the problems i had was attaching a copper gooseneck to the ceramic top of the alembic and I did it with a two part machined piece of brass that screwed into the tapered alembic causing a compression seal which was sealed with a bit of EPDM I had laying around.

Regards,
Charles





#7 van

van

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts

Posted 02 October 2010 - 07:15 PM

I have placed stained glass without foil in the bottom of a bowl to add to glaze. Can glass with or without foil be successfully incorporated into the wall of a pot in a manner such that it can be part of the wall like a window without melting? Would a groove do this? What cone would be necessary? I have some 1/2 inch thick glass chunks bought in Chartres. Does the thickness make a difference?

#8 Username

Username

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 60 posts
  • LocationGeneva

Posted 02 October 2010 - 10:29 PM

I have placed stained glass without foil in the bottom of a bowl to add to glaze. Can glass with or without foil be successfully incorporated into the wall of a pot in a manner such that it can be part of the wall like a window without melting? Would a groove do this? What cone would be necessary? I have some 1/2 inch thick glass chunks bought in Chartres. Does the thickness make a difference?

Attached Files




#9 Username

Username

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 60 posts
  • LocationGeneva

Posted 02 October 2010 - 10:43 PM

Jay Strommen has been adding glass to his 'vector' and 'light gathering crevice' sculptures for a coupe of years. It took him many, many tries to get it to work (fairly) reliably. He fires at cone ten.
When I took a class with him he had been working on them for at least a year, and that was a couple of years ago.

BY the way, this text should have accompanied the reply above, but when I tried to edit my post, things got a little crazy. That'll teach me.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users