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missholly

how to thin a glaze down

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missholly    1

my tests come out fine and when i mix a bigger batch (x25) it doesnt come out right.

 

the glazes are too thick, then when i add water, the gloss goes away.

can anything be added other than water to thin down a glaze?

is there any kind of chart or database that would tell me exactly how much water to use for a specific glaze?

 

^06

silica 2

3124 89.5

epk 8.5

bentonite 2

vgum 1 tsp

 

5% nickle oxide

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neilestrick    1,381

I just go for a creamy chocolate milk consistency. To thicken it back up, add 0.5% epsom salts. It will also help keep the glaze from settling out. If the gloss goes away, it's probably applied way too thin. That glaze should be glossy no matter what you do with the firing.

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TJR    359

Neil;

The bentonite is in there to prevent settling.No need to be redundant.

Just leave the glaze for a couple of days. Decant two cottage cheese size plastic tubs of water off the top. Mix it up and make a test. Take off more water than you think to need to. It is easier to add a bit back in.

Sounds like the glaze is very thin.

TJR.

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missholly    1

its very thick. i cant take any more water off. but when i add water, it fires thick, muddy and dry.

 

now im reading something about sodium silicate, but cant find any guidlines on how much to use.

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Min    783

In your recipe you have veegum @ 1tsp per 100 base. Is this dry veegum you are using at 1 tsp or a veegum water solution? If it's dry I think that might be your problem as it would be a heck of a lot to add to 100 grams dry glaze base. The dryness might come from having 5% nickel as it is very refractory. My guess, and it's only that, is you have 2 issues; too much gum which is causing the thickness plus dryness from the nickel without additional flux to compensate for it.

 

Min

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neilestrick    1,381

Don't add sodium silicate. You don't want to deflocculuate the glaze.

 

TJR- Even with bentonite, with that much frit and a low percentage of clay, you'll still want the epsom salts. Not redundant at all. You need to get the frit to stick to the clay.

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