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perceived value of a piece


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#21 Kohaku

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 12:47 PM

In my experience, most people working with clay start off realizing that they don't know much about it. Then they reach a point where they feel they are gaining a little knowledge and skill but stuill realize they have a lot to learn. Then they "progress" to thinking that they know a lot about it. It is only much later that they then realize that they don't really know diddly in the big scale of the ceramics field. It is those in the middle ground that tend to make those kinds of sweeping statements. It is those in the last category that should be the ones to listen to.

best,

..............john


.... Socrates....?
Not all who wander are lost

#22 Min

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 05:34 PM


I had an instructor once who said, "Any pot can be improved by the addition of a lid or a handle ".

What do you think of that statement?


Like many things that have been stated as broad generalities of absolute "fact"......... it ain't.Posted Image


In my experience, most people working with clay start off realizing that they don't know much about it. Then they reach a point where they feel they are gaining a little knowledge and skill but stuill realize they have a lot to learn. Then they "progress" to thinking that they know a lot about it. It is only much later that they then realize that they don't really know diddly in the big scale of the ceramics field. It is those in the middle ground that tend to make those kinds of sweeping statements. It is those in the last category that should be the ones to listen to.

best,

..............john

You nailed it John, and thank you for correcting me several times! 24 years of slinging mud so I've just scratched the surface, or would that be sgraffitoed the surface? (insert creepy smiley face here)


The more I learn the more I learn how little I know - Socrates

#23 Pres

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 06:27 PM


I had an instructor once who said, "Any pot can be improved by the addition of a lid or a handle ".

What do you think of that statement?


Like many things that have been stated as broad generalities of absolute "fact"......... it ain't.Posted Image


In my experience, most people working with clay start off realizing that they don't know much about it. Then they reach a point where they feel they are gaining a little knowledge and skill but stuill realize they have a lot to learn. Then they "progress" to thinking that they know a lot about it. It is only much later that they then realize that they don't really know diddly in the big scale of the ceramics field. It is those in the middle ground that tend to make those kinds of sweeping statements. It is those in the last category that should be the ones to listen to.

best,

..............john


Bury me the day that I become so knowledgeable that I can't learn any thing new! Posted Image

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#24 JBaymore

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 06:43 PM

Bury me the day that I become so knowledgeable that I can't learn any thing new!



What he said.


best,


......................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#25 Mark C.

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 08:37 PM

In my 40 years with clay it seems just when you master the (whatever) process and think you have it down it all goes to hell in a hand basket.
Its a humbling learning curve to say the least.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#26 Min

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 09:44 PM

In my 40 years with clay it seems just when you master the (whatever) process and think you have it down it all goes to hell in a hand basket.
Its a humbling learning curve to say the least.
Mark



ditto what Mark said. My usual is to get a technique and glaze sorted out and then change clays so everything messes up at once.


min




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