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Trimming stamped ware.


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#1 Pres

Pres

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:08 AM

Just an observation here. I throw plates/patens for communion services. The group that I throw them for requires a rubber stamped logo on the plate surface. When trimming these, I notice that I always have a difficult time staying even across the foot indent. I have finally realized that it isn't me, it is the stamped area with higher compression that makes it difficult to get an even cut. This occurs whether I stamp into the wet clay, or the cheese hard clay. I use loop tools to trim, and keep them sharp. I also use a flat metal rib held perpendicular across the center lately and that seems to do the best job. Any suggestion?

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#2 AtomicAxe

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 11:47 AM

It could just be the compression and displacement of clay AROUND the stamp ... have you tried using a rib to heavily compress your plate surface before stamping?

#3 Pres

Pres

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 04:56 PM

It could just be the compression and displacement of clay AROUND the stamp ... have you tried using a rib to heavily compress your plate surface before stamping?


I always compress the plates heavily with a wooden rib in the beginning, and then with a rubber rib for smoother surface. I am certain it is because of the compression around the stamped area long with displacement. The only thing that seems to even it out is the large straight hack saw blade over the center once trimmed down. I don't place the stamp in the center more at 10, 2, 4 or 8 on the clock half way from center to edge.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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