Jump to content


Photo

Success at Wholesale


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Wendy Rosen

Wendy Rosen

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • LocationBaltimore, MD and St Pete, FL

Posted 25 February 2013 - 11:59 AM

If you think you can't wholesale... is it your work, or your price structure?

All to often ceramic artists underprice their works when selling locally.

These artists have learned how to make work that sells at the right price,

a price that provides them with a livable wage and a secure stable of
galleries and shops.

Here's a list of those artists who have learned how to succeed at
selling to shops and galleries. Please add more names to the list.


Amy Meya
ceramicartistamymeya.blogspot.com/Amy's colorful sculpture and production work gives galleries both ends

of the price point spectrum.
Cathy Broski
www.broskiclay.comCathy and Amy Meya have found their success by making sculptural work in all sizes andprice points.

They save on expenses by traveling together to Philly each year.
Suki Diamond Ceramics
sukidiamond.comSuki Diamond covers every need for any gallery. From tableware to home accessories,

garden sculpture and wall pieces her majolica collections are favorites among many galleries.
Jeff Margolin
jeffmargolin.com
The clay sculptures of Jeff Margolin convey a strong artistic message which is a product of astonishing
and sensual aesthetics, and includes fascinating philosophical statements. Jeffs work is large and bold,
his signature forms are coveted by top galleries around the country.

Marge Margulies
margemarguliespottery.comYou can call Marge's pottery functional if you like, but it's equally sculptural in the right setting.

Marge balances her retail events and wholesale accounts carefully keeping her business growing.
Charan Sachar
creativewithclay.blogspot.com
creativewithclay.com
Charan just returned from his first Buyers Market of American Craft with more orders
than he could have imagined. Enjoy his latest blog entry about booth design, packing and
shipping to the show.


Anne T. Gary
www.annegary.comAnn's thrown, pinched, pulled and curved vases are available at top galleries and fineshops throughout the USA and Canada.
Vaughan E. Nelson
onebluemarble.com
Vaughan Nelson has his hands full with a public studio in the heart of Spanish Village in
San Diego. His wholesale accounts keep his income evenly spread out in the off season.


Newman Ceramic Works
newmanceramicworks.com

Alan and Brenda Newman have been full time studio potters since 1978. They are known
for organic formed functional porcelain and their matt microcrystalline glazing technique.

Arts Business Institute | Blog

"FREE weekly business tips for artists!
Sign up today!
www.artsbusinessinstitute.org/category/blog


Wendy Rosen
Cell: 410.262.2872

Facebook
LinkedIn

The Arts Business Institute

Public Policy & Advocacy
American Made Alliance

#2 robin jack

robin jack

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 28 March 2013 - 09:47 AM

Whole sale work is better than simple shop work. You just have to need to avail all the stock from the company. The local shopkeeper buy all the products on a large quantity that will be more beneficial for you so that's way I think the wholesale work is more easy for you.
  • likes this

#3 Wendy Rosen

Wendy Rosen

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • LocationBaltimore, MD and St Pete, FL

Posted 29 March 2013 - 09:17 AM

Whole sale work is better than simple shop work. You just have to need to avail all the stock from the company. The local shopkeeper buys all the products on a large quantity that will be more beneficial for you so that's way I think the wholesale work is more easy for you.


Wendy Rosen
Cell: 410.262.2872

Facebook
LinkedIn

The Arts Business Institute

Public Policy & Advocacy
American Made Alliance

#4 Wendy Rosen

Wendy Rosen

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • LocationBaltimore, MD and St Pete, FL

Posted 29 March 2013 - 09:19 AM

Robin, I think what you're trying to say is that you can "sell it" before you make it? That's probably the biggest advantage to having a wholesale part of your studio. When you retail you have to have more inventory, and physically move it several times before you actually sell the piece. When you wholesale you are filling an order... not guessing what the customer wants next!
Wendy Rosen
Cell: 410.262.2872

Facebook
LinkedIn

The Arts Business Institute

Public Policy & Advocacy
American Made Alliance

#5 Guest_scott312_*

Guest_scott312_*
  • Guests

Posted 29 March 2013 - 10:31 AM

Robin, I think what you're trying to say is that you can "sell it" before you make it? That's probably the biggest advantage to having a wholesale part of your studio. When you retail you have to have more inventory, and physically move it several times before you actually sell the piece. When you wholesale you are filling an order... not guessing what the customer wants next!





I really like the wholesale end of pottery.


Happy Good Friday everyone.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users