Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Underglaze transfers


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Marge Levy

Marge Levy

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 27 August 2012 - 04:42 PM

I have used some undergoaze transfers from China, those blue and while printed patterns, on tissue. Has anyone tried making similar ones in the USA. Silk screened on tissue I am thinking. ANd if so, what have you used for 'ink'? Mayco stroke and coat or some other underglaze? Binder? Want to make MY patterns but wonder if anyone has tried and has suggestions.


In advance, thanks for sharing your experience.



Marge

#2 Lucille Oka

Lucille Oka

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 756 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 27 August 2012 - 07:04 PM

I have used some undergoaze transfers from China, those blue and while printed patterns, on tissue. Has anyone tried making similar ones in the USA. Silk screened on tissue I am thinking. ANd if so, what have you used for 'ink'? Mayco stroke and coat or some other underglaze? Binder? Want to make MY patterns but wonder if anyone has tried and has suggestions.


In advance, thanks for sharing your experience.



Marge


Try searching Paul Wandless he has a video on silk screening for ceramics; search here on CAD or Google.

John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#3 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,532 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 28 August 2012 - 06:31 AM

Hi Marge,
I have been experimenting with image transfers following a litho technique on a video on Ceramics Arts Daily. It works well if you use simple designs or images.
Go the Ceramics Arts Daily on the above menu and search "litho". It is pretty straight forward.
I tried using litho crayons directly rather than xerox images. The pigment didn't stick well. I'll need to continue experimenting with that.
I think you could use a blue mason stain for what you are intending.

I did silk screen ceramic decals ages ago (1971) I like this litho technique better. More artistic flexibility.

Marcia

#4 Paula Patton

Paula Patton

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • LocationBloomington, IN

Posted 28 August 2012 - 12:53 PM

You can print your own if you have access to a laser printer:

http://www.papilio.c...iginal pas.html

The nice lady at Crop Circle Clay uses them and gave me the link above, see her work with the decals here:

http://www.etsy.com/.../CropCircleClay

I have yet to try this out, but want to...

#5 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,532 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 29 August 2012 - 06:21 AM

You can print your own if you have access to a laser printer:

http://www.papilio.c...inal%20pas.html

The nice lady at Crop Circle Clay uses them and gave me the link above, see her work with the decals here:

http://www.etsy.com/.../CropCircleClay

I have yet to try this out, but want to...


excellent info and resource!!! The Laser printer decal printer is really a nice option especially for color!


Thanks Paula.
Marcia


#6 Jessica Knapp

Jessica Knapp

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 31 posts
  • LocationColumbus, Ohio

Posted 30 August 2012 - 10:05 AM


You can print your own if you have access to a laser printer:

http://www.papilio.c...inal%20pas.html

The nice lady at Crop Circle Clay uses them and gave me the link above, see her work with the decals here:

http://www.etsy.com/.../CropCircleClay

I have yet to try this out, but want to...


excellent info and resource!!! The Laser printer decal printer is really a nice option especially for color!


Thanks Paula.
Marcia


Please note that the laser printing option above is non-fired. From the Papilio site:

"Ceramic Plates: The PAS paper is to make NON fired decals only. Porcelain plates decorated with PAS-decal can make a beautiful wall hanging but cannot be used as food bearing plates. This type of decal is not permanent in the same way as over the glaze fired porcelain or china paint decals. See important information on how to place decal on plates below on this page.

Porcelain/ceramic Mugs: The PAS paper can be used to make a non-fired decal to decorate mugs. Please keep in mind that this is not a permanent decoration like fired porcelain colors. Mugs can be hand washed in warm water using nonabrasive soap. This type of decal is quite durable if not scratched with sharp objects. A mug with this type of decal is NOT dishwasher safe. It can survive the washing cycle of a dishwasher one or two times, but then the whole decal may come off. "



#7 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,532 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 31 August 2012 - 12:48 PM

I just fired my test of using part of Kristina Bogdanov photo lithography (video on CAD) on clay but tried it with litho crayon drawing instead of using photographs and xerox copies. I made drawings with the crayon on copy paper, rolled out the ink made of linseed oil and mason stain, and then transferred it to paper clay porcelain. I raku fired it this morning. I have been testing things for my focus in a residency in France beginning in September. I will be gone for 7 weeks. I shipped items I'll need for doing this technique.
Here is my first result:

Attached Files



#8 DallasGypsy

DallasGypsy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts
  • LocationFlorida

Posted 31 August 2012 - 02:14 PM

I just fired my test of using part of Kristina Bogdanov photo lithography (video on CAD) on clay but tried it with litho crayon drawing instead of using photographs and xerox copies. I made drawings with the crayon on copy paper, rolled out the ink made of linseed oil and mason stain, and then transferred it to paper clay porcelain. I raku fired it this morning. I have been testing things for my focus in a residency in France beginning in September. I will be gone for 7 weeks. I shipped items I'll need for doing this technique.
Here is my first result:


This is really beautiful & unique. Hope that you enjoy your time in France. Post piccies of your travels as well as your pottery.

#9 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,532 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 31 August 2012 - 02:57 PM

Thanks Dallas Gypsy.
I like drawing better than painting, and I think I am developing a new way of using that.
I am very excited about this technique. Check out the video on CAD Kristina Bogdanov photo lithography
for some idea of the process.
Marcia

#10 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,532 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 01 September 2012 - 12:16 PM

Marge,
Maybe this is more what you are trying to do. Check out Alice Drew's blog.
and her gallery. In the recent Pottery Making Illustrated, Alice describes using a Thermofax machine.
http://www.alicedrew...bum=1&gallery=6

Marcia




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users