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Sheryl Leigh

Wood firing conversations?

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I have three relatively small pieces  of Troy Wood Fire clay cone ten, already bisqued at cone 5, and glazed with cone 10 glazes in prep for a recent wood fire.  Unfortunately, the pieces did not make it into the only wood fire that I had access to,  and I am not likely to access another one anytime soon. I also won't be filling my electric kiln with cone 10 work.  So...what is the worst that might happen to the glaze if I fired these glazed pieces to cone 5? The pieces are decorative and not for food. Should I just ditch them (don't really wanna do that)? Should I wash off the glaze and leave them just bisqued (hey look OK)? Or should I just go ahead and electric fire them  at cone 5 with the glaze and see what happens?  

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1 hour ago, LeeU said:

I have three relatively small pieces  of Troy Wood Fire clay cone ten, already bisqued at cone 5, and glazed with cone 10 glazes in prep for a recent wood fire.  Unfortunately, the pieces did not make it into the only wood fire that I had access to,  and I am not likely to access another one anytime soon. I also won't be filling my electric kiln with cone 10 work.  So...what is the worst that might happen to the glaze if I fired these glazed pieces to cone 5? The pieces are decorative and not for food. Should I just ditch them (don't really wanna do that)? Should I wash off the glaze and leave them just bisqued (hey look OK)? Or should I just go ahead and electric fire them  at cone 5 with the glaze and see what happens?  

I'm thinking.  Wild stab here.    Re bisque piece to hold glaze.    Save piece till next wood firing.      Another thought the Troy clay( I understand my recipe a derivative of) is pretty reactive with out glaze, so washing is an option.   but even washing will leave some residue of original glaze.     Did you mean bisque at 5 or 05?   

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On 11/30/2017 at 11:31 AM, Guest JBaymore said:

A guess...... lighter ash deposits, more "flashing", and less really "gnarly" crusty pieces.  But that is totally a guess.

best,

..................john

It's true, there wasn't as much ash deposit as I would have liked to see, but everyone was very happy with how their work came out, so there's that.  For the next firing, I was told that we needed to take the heating period much slower in order to get a good ash deposit and then go for the melt.  Still not "gnarly", I guess, but interesting, I hope!

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Is there any significant downside to bisque firing high fire pieces at cone 5,  to prep for a cone 10 wood fire.  I don't want to have to fill a kiln with low fire ware (which I don't usually make) just to get some pieces ready for a wood fire.  I've done it before and did not discern any ill effects--but whadda I know?! 

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Hmmm - I guess it's fine, but it seems like over-kill to me.  There's some notable potters who don't even bisque prior to a wood fire, but their breakage levels might be a bit higher, too.

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It is a community kiln and bisquing work first is a requirement.  

Well, it finally dawned on me that I really just need to make enough  work for wood firing in general to fill up my kiln for a biscuit run.  I was trying to save money, but if I want to participate in wood firing, I best get over it and get on with it. DUH!!!! Why didn't I think of that before posting ? LOL

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If you are going for reduction effects in your wood firing, particularly reducing the clay body for toasty browns, reds and oranges, then firing to cone 5 in oxidation first will tighten up the body too much.    Body reduction really takes place starting at around 800 C up to the point where your glaze ingredients get a good melt happening ( at which point body reduction is pretty much over and glaze reduction begins).  Bisqueing to around 1000 C still leaves the body open enough to achieve good reduction effects for most clays.

In addition,  your clay body will likely no longer absorb glaze slop when fired to such a high level.  It will be hard to glaze pots which are essentially already vitrified.

Unless your clay body is crazy refractory, then Cone 5 is not really bisque firing - it is more like a full stoneware firing.

as someone asked above, are you really talking about cone 5?  Or cone 05?  Huge difference.  If cone 05 then ignore pretty much everything I have said here...

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Yep...I was firing my cone 10 clay for  bisque at 5 because I didn't want to have to fill a kiln for a low fire.  Curt..thanks for explaining. I'm looking forward to the next anagama firing in April.

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