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Karen B

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Everything posted by Karen B

  1. It was fascinating to see a video of a potter who worked with porcelain wearing all white. Made sense. I like yoga pants and low cut tee shirt. Feeling sexy helps me be creative.
  2. Hi, so it's been awhile since I've been here on this forum. We've empty nested and moved to NJ from Mass. My studio contents have been in storage for the last 7 months. In a few weeks, I will have a house and a studio again! I have been taking classes at TASOC in Demarest to stay sane. I fell hard for the reduction look there. Since I sold my electric kiln before we moved, I am in need of a new kiln and plan to buy a gas kiln and fire to cone 6. What I know: There is a natural gas line right near the garage wall where I will set up (indoors). I will need the right size fitting to the kiln for the gas. There is a high window that I can vent out of. I probably will get a Bailey.... OK, that's it! ha ha not much. Questions: -Can I bisque in the gas kiln? -How much of the time during the firing do I need to be doing something? -Will my cone 6 electric glazes look fabulous fired in reduction? -Things to consider when shopping for the kiln? -Please recommend a good step by step book for firing with gas and reducing. -I'd love to take a workshop but haven't seen anything.... have you? -What do I need to know? Thank you for any help! Karen Come see the reduction work I've done (but not fired myself) at Peter's Valley Craft Show Sept 24th and 25th!
  3. Ah..... but beware the Dark Side. WOOD firing! MMmmmmuuuuhhhhhhaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhaaaaaaaaaaaaaa! Electric leads to gas. And gas leads to soda and salt. And salt and soda lead to wood. Take over your life, it will. best, .........................john Yes, John, I have already heard the siren call of Salt! But one step at a time for me! Marc your positive mindset is very much in line with mine, Thank you. Karen
  4. Oh Marcia! How generous! I would do cone 6 reduction. I will be in touch. Thank you so much. Karen
  5. Thank you John, Neil, Mags, 1515, Oldlady, and Marc, from the bottom of my heart for your thoughtful answers! I will consider the information, read the material and talk to the people you have suggested. Mostly I will slow down and make sure I do it right.
  6. I have used Gare Lime Light. Which comes in a pint jar. Nice and shiny. Good for 06 - 04. http://www.gare.com/search.cfm#!prettyPhoto I have used a few of their other greens too, but I think Lime Light matches best.
  7. Marcia, when you have time, could you post a picture of your coils? I would greatly appreciate it. Karen
  8. Hi Jojess, I am going to say grog, (because that is what I use), in place of sand, (what you use). When I have grog stuck to the back of my plates, I rub the backs together and it comes off. Or I can use any fired flat bottom to rub off anything that sticks, like grog or kiln wash. The grog should be thin to avoid unevenness. I do leave the grog on my kiln shelves, however, I do rub the sides and bottom with a clean dry green scrubby before placing in the kiln to avoid any stray grains. I don't know if you saw it, but I described how to apply the grog to the shelf above. Hi Karen, thank you for your hints and tips..i used grog on my shelves for the first time and no cracks in my hearts yay!! I am now trying paperclay, rather than the porcelain that i have been using as someone suggested that it maybe more suited to my flat pieces. I have some more hearts drying so yet to see what they will do in the first firing. That sounds like a good idea Jo. Let us know how it works.
  9. Are you interested in large leaves? Like as much as 8" across?
  10. Hi Jojess, I am going to say grog, (because that is what I use), in place of sand, (what you use). When I have grog stuck to the back of my plates, I rub the backs together and it comes off. Or I can use any fired flat bottom to rub off anything that sticks, like grog or kiln wash. The grog should be thin to avoid unevenness. I do leave the grog on my kiln shelves, however, I do rub the sides and bottom with a clean dry green scrubby before placing in the kiln to avoid any stray grains. I don't know if you saw it, but I described how to apply the grog to the shelf above.
  11. 3mugs

    Love your mugs!
  12. A word about putting grog (or sand) on your kiln shelves. I found that it doesn't need to be more than a thin coating. The easy way to get an even thin coating is to hold your hand about a foot or more over the shelf and sprinkle as you move over the entire surface. Of course you are far away from anything that doesn't need grog on it! Since putting grog on my kiln shelves, I have had no cracking.
  13. A question for those of you who single fire. Do you dip your entire pot in one glaze? I tried to single fire once, and I dipped the top quarter of the pot in one glaze, and when I could handle it and went to dip the bottom 3/4, it just broke right off at the edge of the first dip. When I went to dip a whole pot in glaze, it fell apart. So, what do you do?
  14. Incredibly beautiful. Thanks for posting.
  15. Bowl brown bowl

    From the album 2015

    Standard 112 clay, cone 6 ox
  16. 2015

  17. AlbanyRutileBowl

    From the album 2015

    Standard 112 clay, cone 6 ox
  18. TR8 Blues bowl

    From the album 2015

    Standard 112 clay, cone 6 ox
  19. YOY Bowl

    From the album 2015

    Standard 112 clay, cone 6 ox
  20. Your Dream Studio?

    A studio assistant!
  21. Back Aches And Wheels

    I was at a Jennifer McCurdy workshop last weekend. Someone asked her about her back. She said she uses an office chair (with wheels removed) and changes the height throughout the day, in relation to what she is doing on the wheel. She also rides her bike 20 miles each and every morning (on Nantucket!). She also works 7 days a week. And this is what she says keeps her back from hurting.
  22. Amoco Celadon Glazes

    Even though I make my own glazes, I was interested in trying a couple of the Amoco Celedon glazes for the interesting shades presented in the ad. They looked awful the first time (on porcelain), and after talking to the customer service people, who told me not to do a slow cool, they looked equally awful the second time. Ya win some, ya lose some. This was just a waste of money.
  23. The thing about cultural expression is an interesting idea. In Japan the culture was so much more contained, the evolution of the forms so much slower. Here in America, the culture is a true melting pot. To express this culture is not a simple form or idea. It will vary from state to state, town to town, neighborhood to neighborhood. It will never develop like Japanese pottery. That is not a bad thing. It is true. The huge variations and choices we have within our own studios ARE reflective of our culture. When I was studying art (painting) in NYC back in the early 80's, it would not remain 2D. It broke out in 3D with plaster, chicken wire, wax, wood. The museums and galleries reflected a lot of this genre. I spent one summer back then in San Francisco in a painting class at San Francisco Art Institute. I gathered mediums for the class, but all I felt compelled to work with was colored pencils and water colors on paper. The air, the culture, the smell, the energy, the people, all different. It affected me. Maybe one should take Hamada's comment about adding granite to the clay as just about that specific act.
  24. Really nice Mark. I feel that your craftsmanship is what makes the glazes sing. I am outside of Boston, ha ha and I love it.
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