Jump to content

Beggs n Achin

Members
  • Content Count

    17
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Beggs n Achin

  1. I'm wondering if I have maybe 2 levels of alumina in the 2 different clay locations on my property then? Bc I have the one half glazed bowl that made it, I posted at the beginning of this thread, and a bunch if little teacups that made it. There are 2 locations Im working with- 1 is very pure, dug from 3 ft down w a backhoe. That one dries very quickly, grey. And the other is higher up on the hill, yellow or gray, and that was the stuff I had to seive. More pliable and doesnt dry as fast. Seems to stay tan in color when it dries, whereas the other has that green tint to it.
  2. That is very cool about the brick kiln. The guy who ran the museum here in town knew some information personally about the brick manufacturer here, but there was surprisingly little info to be gleaned. He did point us to the place where all of the clay was dug out, which set me goin bc it is the same as ours, only a mile or two away. Maybe I can find more at the local library. There has been little info there too, as far as firing without an actual kiln. Am finding that these Youtube videos with primitive pottery aren't as simple as it looks lol. Unless they all have really great clay th
  3. Hubs was commenting, before I read him this post, that the little piece I had fired that glowed white/yellow, reminded him of aluminum ore. And he also had read (bc he is the one that reads geology books for fun and rock hounds in our driveway) that the Willapa Hills where we are were a big source of aluminum ore, but that it was "dirty", or impure like our coal. Therefore it was cheaper to get aluminum elsewhere, and now we ship in our coal as well bc it is actually cheaper to ship it in than to pay to process it here. Then... I'm reading in this pdf study here (again) about the brick
  4. Portland is actually closer, I think bc of traffic. And in the meantime, I'm burning the useless shelf full.of fun stuff I did. Smashing thi.gs releives a bit if the frustration. What I don't understand also... my well is a spring fed well and we have iron water from all the iron here in the ground, and also the creek water here (where the clay was) is also yellow. And the culprit is aluminum? I know I'm being dumb here, but... ah well. I have an aunt who offered me her gas kiln, but I had no way to haul the heavy thing home. She lived in Shelton, WA on a creek as well, and dug out clay f
  5. Yes, I was watching the stove very closely and the one piece that glowed that hot was a very small, 2 inch, thin piece and I took it out and let it cool, spread the fire put some and let some heat out. lol I never expected it to glow that color. lol And... that piece still broke the next day. My brain is fried tryin to figure out how I can rip on it after it cools, TRYING to break it... it does not break so it fools me into thinking I finally got it... then the next day I'm holding it in my hand, and snap.... No water was added, either. Urf. I will try the additive listed above and see
  6. Link to.study. It is Lewis County, if that helps. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.dnr.wa.gov/Publications/ger_b24_clay_shales_wa_1.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjk56nnr93gAhVVpZ4KHT7SDAAQFjACegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw2qzUrkj9BecVPni4eR02O2&cshid=1551320749011 I think the green color is lighting. That clay is kind.of.tan, brown, or yellow to orange due to iron. The stuff deep in the ground is all grey and dries really fast. And disregard my gloating aboit finally firi g a.puece. I just broke my stupid so
  7. K, having technical difficulties. It is only allowing me to upload one picture. Ever. In any posts. Or the whole page. If you are really bored, I have been uploading pics to my farm.blog.page. fb.me/pleasantvalleyroadchehalis And I have a very long, boring video on Youtube regarding my last firing at And if this is all just too neurotic.and self absorbed... y'all gotta tell me, bc I'm just.over here dissectimg stuff w my brain and I won't even know if y'all think I'm an idiot bc... I'm still tryin research and learn stuff. lol
  8. Ok, an update. Maybe y'all can let me pick yer brain some more. Pictured below is the brick kiln I started working on. There is some fire brick in there at the bottom, but that got expensive quick, hence the red bricks. I figured.... my 100 yr old house chimney is red brick and it's been doin fine for 100 years....? 40 cents is a lot easier to replace than $2 and a half each. This kiln is much smaller, as suggested above. BUT it still needs reworked bc apparently the burn chamber where I put the wood is too tiny and needs more air flow. It's snowing right now so... that projec
  9. I was thinking this design on my existing firepit. Similar to what I already had going, but more vertical It seems the idea is to close off the area where pottery is, but do not close off the fire. Is this correct? This also seems like this fire would need a lot of ongoing babysitting, shoving little sticks in there every hour. And these primitive pottery videos don't tell you how long to leave the stuff in the fire. The Natives and their pit fires lasted a whole day into the night, but this setup is more like a rocket stove, that gets much higher temps bc of its really good air
  10. Interesting.. I'm still rollin stuff around in my brain now... lol I need to be.done building cow fence and get back to clay. lol I will never be done w fence. 13 acres of fence w cross fencing....ugh. Ok, about the kiln idea up here in the hillside or kiln built w dirt, tube kiln... Let me attach a couple pictures, see if I was close, bc I think I may have been (has since been torn down and is now just a fire pit for bc it was reduced to a collapsed mud pile while on fire, during one rainstorm- it rains sheets of rain sideways, here) - yes, its ugly as sin. I had menti
  11. I'm breaking off the cup handles when I am done firing them, or I moved a piece of wood around. So it will look like it's done, I pull it out.of the now cool woodstove, and the handle breaks off. Ya, this woodstove isn't gonna do it. Sigh... Have to build fence before I can build a kiln again- this time, no pit. Too many breaking things involved in that pit. But I'm close, I know if I can get that heat, I will have a primitive form of pottery, and then I can improve from there. I'm actually ok with imperfections at this point, going for the whole primitive thing. Al
  12. That was a clear, low fire glaze, one of my first bowls. I have been watching all the primitive pottery videos all over Youtube. I think I'm really close to getting it, and I think you are right about the temps. The mud kiln outside that I built was too big, I think. I had the fire to far down in the ground to the pottery up above it. There is one video where the guy builds a cylinder, basically a rocket drive out of mud. I was going for that kind of, and I got the temps at first, but it was very hard to build the fire down in that pit and keep the heat in. It was a skinny, deep pit
  13. I skimmed over this original post, looking for primitive pottery pit firing tips w my local clay, and I'm a noob and right away it got toooo technical for me just yet. Maybe at a later time. But for now, I have a pit dug out in my yard, some grey clay also dug from out in my yard, and I'm just tryin to figure out how the Natives did it, bc obviously the stuff lasts and lasts bc there are still pieces around from caveman days. And Mexico, Africa, India still fire pottery with fire and make it work, so....
  14. And... I don't see a way to.delete the duplicate post. Urf....
  15. 3 of the cups fired outside that handles broke off of. This camera isnt showing how orange these things are. They are a very terra.cotta.color. The shiny howl in the original post was fired in the woodstove inside and did better. Note, that it was windy and rainy in December when I tried to fire outside. It made a smoky fire and I rhonk it didnt get as hot, but I think the oitside fire heats more evenly bc it is down in the ground 3 ft. I have one more piece I'm re-firing in the woodstove right now w no glaze that was part of that batch that handles were breaking
  16. 3 of the cups fired outside that handles broke off of. This camera isnt showing how orange these things are. They are a very terra.cotta.color. The shiny howl in the original post was fired in the woodstove inside and did better. Note, that it was windy and rainy in December when I tried to fire outside. It made a smoky fire and I rhonk it didnt get as hot, but I think the oitside fire heats more evenly bc it is down in the ground 3 ft. I have one more piece I'm re-firing in the woodstove right now w no glaze that was part of that batch that handles were breaking
  17. I do not have a kiln and really don't want to get one. I'm aiming for primitive skills. My ancestors did it, so can I. I am new to pottery. Only worked with clay in high school, so now, 20 years later. But even then, my art teacher dug up local, brown clay from the Chehalis River basin in Western Washington. I have fired little beads and things successfully in my woodstove in the house with the local brown clay. Also did a lot.of.cob in my old hpuse.and built a fire pit and fireplace surround with cob (clay, sand, straw mixture) So I moved to a new place and it is LOADED with gr
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.