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Maraku13

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  1. I know pricing has probably been discussed in this forum more than once. I have been selling my work, Raku, at Art and Wine festivals for 5 years, slowly increasing the prices to find a good price point. I believe I have found good price points for my work, based on the how many pieces I have sold at my most recent festivals. In fact, I am concerned that my prices are still low. I believe, for example, and this is just an example, that it is better to sell 5 pieces for $1000.00 vs. 10 pieces for $1000.00. My partner believes the exact opposite, saying, "Don't you want to sell more pieces and move inventory?". This leads to a discussion about discounts when customers want to purchase, for example, 3 pieces that are priced at $300.00 total, and the customer offers $240.00(20% discount). I refuse to provide discounts because I believe my work is reasonably priced. My partner can't believe that I would not take $240.00, again asking, "Don't you want to sell them?", and "Isn't it better to sell pieces vs. not?" I'd like to get some feedback, am I way off base, am I being too rigid about my pricing, and really, is it better to have higher sales volume at lower prices? Thanks, Terry
  2. Hi Mary, More info: In the Skutt Manual it says the sensing rod may be the issue. It says continued operation at high fire temperatures will eventually cause the end of the rod to deteriorate or bend. And that this will affect the adjustment of the trigger and claw. If the the rod is bent it must be replaced. I fire to cone 05 most of the time. I took the sensing rod out of kiln sitter and, of course it has a slight bend to it. I ordered a new sensing rod online just to play things safe and will put the new one in when I get it and do a test firing. That's all for now, Terry
  3. Thanks for the replies, the cones have never gotten wet. I found this info at the Orton Cone website: When a Kiln-Sitter® cone or bar does not bend or melts into a blob, the problem is generally related to the Kiln-Sitter®. The cone will melt as the kiln is heated, but it bends due to the sensing rod’s downward pressure. If the firing continues too long, the cone will fully melt into a blob. Some reasons for sensing rod failure include improper adjustment of the Kiln-Sitter®, a bent or corroded sensing rod or Kiln-Sitter® assembly or an object inside or outside the kiln interfering with the sensing rod’s movement. To help prevent these problems, the Kiln-Sitter® should be periodically tested, checked and adjusted using the firing gauge supplied with the device. I'm going to check out my Kiln sitter and do a test firing. Cheers, Terry
  4. Yeah, weird problem, never had this happen to me. Thanks for the info about the cone getting stuck, not sure how that would happen, kinda makes sense, but I'm also wondering if there was just some kind of issue with the cone itself? Like a "bad/defective" cone? Never really heard of that either, but I guess it might be possible. I have a Pyrometer, might be time to mount it on my electric kiln when I do my bisque firings, or, just do a test fire to see if there are any problems with the kiln sitter. Cheers, Terry
  5. Wow, I just had the same bisque firing problem, and I am wondering what might have caused this to happen? Anyone else out there have any ideas? My Kiln Sitter has been working fine. I'm firing to cone 05, and the cone doesn't look crispy, it just looks melted, see the pictures. I also provided a picture of what the cone for my last firing looked like. The other question I have is that the pieces from this firing came out tan/brown, not red/orange like typical bisque, so it seems clear to me they have gone past the point of bisque for Raku? Terry
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