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metal and mud

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  1. Like
    metal and mud reacted to Lucille Oka in Success - what is it?   
    Success for me is envisioning a project, sketching, planning, making the project and it comes out exactly as envisioned.
  2. Like
    metal and mud got a reaction from Christine in Was: Etsy or Ebay? Now: When Should You Start Trying to Sell?   
    I've been thinking about this thread a lot this weekend. I've been having a wonderful time making gift items out of clay--2 and 3 inch lidded boxes on feet, textured and glazed in pretty colors, little Indian rugs hanging from metal racks that my son makes, plates carved with our local Organ Mountains and a moon and glazed to look like moonlight--etc.--different things that just come to me. I had so much fun making them that I couldn't NOT do anything with them. I also know that I need to do a work many times to get better at it; already the lids on my clay boxes fix much better. I am a small business owner and it only seemed natural to sell my items, so last December I got "certified" as a vendor at our Farmer's and Crafts Market. I get such a kick when someone buys one of my--admittedly--imperfect items. They make them happy and me even happier. I use my revenue to buy supplies, thereby supporting my hobby. It's disturbing to me that someone should suggest that we shouldn't put our items in public until many years have passed, implying that the works shouldn't be in public until much better in quality and near-perfect. I view my craft as an incredible relaxation whose result brings happiness to both the maker and the purchaser. After reading some of the posts I started to doubt myself in my decision to put my works in public and my ego on the line, but I had a good firing over the weekend and I know that on July 4th, my next market, some local folks will get a kick out of my little items and I won't stop bringing them to market, for one, nor trying to make them better and better each time. I hope I never achieve perfection because then I might stop.
  3. Like
    metal and mud got a reaction from Iforgot in earth and stone ware   
    I am intested in this question as well. I plan to make a coil bowl out of a red clay--an earthenware clay-- with mica in it in the Native American tradition. An article I read said to burnish, then fire to ^ 08, then place in a wood fire for the smoke effect. Has anyone had fun with this?
  4. Like
    metal and mud got a reaction from CGALVIN3 in Was: Etsy or Ebay? Now: When Should You Start Trying to Sell?   
    I've been thinking about this thread a lot this weekend. I've been having a wonderful time making gift items out of clay--2 and 3 inch lidded boxes on feet, textured and glazed in pretty colors, little Indian rugs hanging from metal racks that my son makes, plates carved with our local Organ Mountains and a moon and glazed to look like moonlight--etc.--different things that just come to me. I had so much fun making them that I couldn't NOT do anything with them. I also know that I need to do a work many times to get better at it; already the lids on my clay boxes fix much better. I am a small business owner and it only seemed natural to sell my items, so last December I got "certified" as a vendor at our Farmer's and Crafts Market. I get such a kick when someone buys one of my--admittedly--imperfect items. They make them happy and me even happier. I use my revenue to buy supplies, thereby supporting my hobby. It's disturbing to me that someone should suggest that we shouldn't put our items in public until many years have passed, implying that the works shouldn't be in public until much better in quality and near-perfect. I view my craft as an incredible relaxation whose result brings happiness to both the maker and the purchaser. After reading some of the posts I started to doubt myself in my decision to put my works in public and my ego on the line, but I had a good firing over the weekend and I know that on July 4th, my next market, some local folks will get a kick out of my little items and I won't stop bringing them to market, for one, nor trying to make them better and better each time. I hope I never achieve perfection because then I might stop.
  5. Downvote
    metal and mud got a reaction from OffCenter in To Be or Not To Be   
    Crap. Ugly vase. Junk. Noobs. These are words hardly befitting this forum. I am a newb-ie who adores clay and knows she has a lot to learn in the clay world. I sell my items at our Farmer's and Craft's Market because I love making them and want other people to enjoy them and get a tremendous kick out of having customers grab them up in happiness. I would hate to have someone I don't know pronounce my work as no good--so please don't visit my booth. I have a long way to go before I can pronounce myself a clay artist (not a craftswoman), but I will get there eventually, and have lots of fun in the process.
  6. Like
    metal and mud got a reaction from CGALVIN3 in To Be or Not To Be   
    Crap. Ugly vase. Junk. Noobs. These are words hardly befitting this forum. I am a newb-ie who adores clay and knows she has a lot to learn in the clay world. I sell my items at our Farmer's and Craft's Market because I love making them and want other people to enjoy them and get a tremendous kick out of having customers grab them up in happiness. I would hate to have someone I don't know pronounce my work as no good--so please don't visit my booth. I have a long way to go before I can pronounce myself a clay artist (not a craftswoman), but I will get there eventually, and have lots of fun in the process.
  7. Like
    metal and mud got a reaction from pricklypotter in Was: Etsy or Ebay? Now: When Should You Start Trying to Sell?   
    I've been thinking about this thread a lot this weekend. I've been having a wonderful time making gift items out of clay--2 and 3 inch lidded boxes on feet, textured and glazed in pretty colors, little Indian rugs hanging from metal racks that my son makes, plates carved with our local Organ Mountains and a moon and glazed to look like moonlight--etc.--different things that just come to me. I had so much fun making them that I couldn't NOT do anything with them. I also know that I need to do a work many times to get better at it; already the lids on my clay boxes fix much better. I am a small business owner and it only seemed natural to sell my items, so last December I got "certified" as a vendor at our Farmer's and Crafts Market. I get such a kick when someone buys one of my--admittedly--imperfect items. They make them happy and me even happier. I use my revenue to buy supplies, thereby supporting my hobby. It's disturbing to me that someone should suggest that we shouldn't put our items in public until many years have passed, implying that the works shouldn't be in public until much better in quality and near-perfect. I view my craft as an incredible relaxation whose result brings happiness to both the maker and the purchaser. After reading some of the posts I started to doubt myself in my decision to put my works in public and my ego on the line, but I had a good firing over the weekend and I know that on July 4th, my next market, some local folks will get a kick out of my little items and I won't stop bringing them to market, for one, nor trying to make them better and better each time. I hope I never achieve perfection because then I might stop.
  8. Like
    metal and mud got a reaction from sawing in Was: Etsy or Ebay? Now: When Should You Start Trying to Sell?   
    I've been thinking about this thread a lot this weekend. I've been having a wonderful time making gift items out of clay--2 and 3 inch lidded boxes on feet, textured and glazed in pretty colors, little Indian rugs hanging from metal racks that my son makes, plates carved with our local Organ Mountains and a moon and glazed to look like moonlight--etc.--different things that just come to me. I had so much fun making them that I couldn't NOT do anything with them. I also know that I need to do a work many times to get better at it; already the lids on my clay boxes fix much better. I am a small business owner and it only seemed natural to sell my items, so last December I got "certified" as a vendor at our Farmer's and Crafts Market. I get such a kick when someone buys one of my--admittedly--imperfect items. They make them happy and me even happier. I use my revenue to buy supplies, thereby supporting my hobby. It's disturbing to me that someone should suggest that we shouldn't put our items in public until many years have passed, implying that the works shouldn't be in public until much better in quality and near-perfect. I view my craft as an incredible relaxation whose result brings happiness to both the maker and the purchaser. After reading some of the posts I started to doubt myself in my decision to put my works in public and my ego on the line, but I had a good firing over the weekend and I know that on July 4th, my next market, some local folks will get a kick out of my little items and I won't stop bringing them to market, for one, nor trying to make them better and better each time. I hope I never achieve perfection because then I might stop.
  9. Like
    metal and mud got a reaction from teardrop in Was: Etsy or Ebay? Now: When Should You Start Trying to Sell?   
    I've been thinking about this thread a lot this weekend. I've been having a wonderful time making gift items out of clay--2 and 3 inch lidded boxes on feet, textured and glazed in pretty colors, little Indian rugs hanging from metal racks that my son makes, plates carved with our local Organ Mountains and a moon and glazed to look like moonlight--etc.--different things that just come to me. I had so much fun making them that I couldn't NOT do anything with them. I also know that I need to do a work many times to get better at it; already the lids on my clay boxes fix much better. I am a small business owner and it only seemed natural to sell my items, so last December I got "certified" as a vendor at our Farmer's and Crafts Market. I get such a kick when someone buys one of my--admittedly--imperfect items. They make them happy and me even happier. I use my revenue to buy supplies, thereby supporting my hobby. It's disturbing to me that someone should suggest that we shouldn't put our items in public until many years have passed, implying that the works shouldn't be in public until much better in quality and near-perfect. I view my craft as an incredible relaxation whose result brings happiness to both the maker and the purchaser. After reading some of the posts I started to doubt myself in my decision to put my works in public and my ego on the line, but I had a good firing over the weekend and I know that on July 4th, my next market, some local folks will get a kick out of my little items and I won't stop bringing them to market, for one, nor trying to make them better and better each time. I hope I never achieve perfection because then I might stop.
  10. Like
    metal and mud got a reaction from teardrop in Was: Etsy or Ebay? Now: When Should You Start Trying to Sell?   
    I've been thinking about this thread a lot this weekend. I've been having a wonderful time making gift items out of clay--2 and 3 inch lidded boxes on feet, textured and glazed in pretty colors, little Indian rugs hanging from metal racks that my son makes, plates carved with our local Organ Mountains and a moon and glazed to look like moonlight--etc.--different things that just come to me. I had so much fun making them that I couldn't NOT do anything with them. I also know that I need to do a work many times to get better at it; already the lids on my clay boxes fix much better. I am a small business owner and it only seemed natural to sell my items, so last December I got "certified" as a vendor at our Farmer's and Crafts Market. I get such a kick when someone buys one of my--admittedly--imperfect items. They make them happy and me even happier. I use my revenue to buy supplies, thereby supporting my hobby. It's disturbing to me that someone should suggest that we shouldn't put our items in public until many years have passed, implying that the works shouldn't be in public until much better in quality and near-perfect. I view my craft as an incredible relaxation whose result brings happiness to both the maker and the purchaser. After reading some of the posts I started to doubt myself in my decision to put my works in public and my ego on the line, but I had a good firing over the weekend and I know that on July 4th, my next market, some local folks will get a kick out of my little items and I won't stop bringing them to market, for one, nor trying to make them better and better each time. I hope I never achieve perfection because then I might stop.
  11. Like
    metal and mud reacted to CGALVIN3 in Was: Etsy or Ebay? Now: When Should You Start Trying to Sell?   
    You beat me to this Chris!!!!!!!! THANKS for saying it too. When I read the original posting before I scrolled down the thread... I was about to head in the exact same direction.
     
    This general subject can be extended SO far beyond the idea of being a "high school student". Same is true of the person who is an older adult but has just started taking ceramics classes and is looking at the same kind of thing.
     
    Just because something sells.... does not necessarly make it "good"....... the incesant TV infomercials prove that point . Just because something can be done does not mean is should be done......... look at some of the GMO foodstuffs they are attempting to make .
     
     
     
    best,
     
    ...............john
     
     
     
    Okay, I didn't know you guys would freak out so much about me advertising my pottery but I get the fact that you guys don't want advertising on here that's fine with me. I also get the fact that you guys believe that I shouldn't be worried about selling my work at such a young age. but that's not all I'm worried about at all. I've only sold a fraction of what I have made. I have a basement full of my work but I just can't keep letting it pile up. It's not like I have my own studio or storage I can put it in. I don't make the rules in my house. So therefor I sell my work. I don't do pottery for the money because if you guys don't know there is little money in making pottery and very few people have the talent to make a living off of it. I have gone to many craft sales, talked and taken classes with professional potters, been a volunteer at the OPA Showcase for 3 years and a lot of different galleries in Portland. I have learned alot from all these events and I've used tips to help make my pottery better.
     
    And just because you've been doing pottery longer than someone doesn't make your stuff better or you better. I've seen people that have taken classes for many years and in college that there stuff isn't close to mine and even they agree. Just because someone has been doing something for a long time doesn't make them automatically "Good" and just because you have a potters wheel doesn't make you a potter.
  12. Downvote
    metal and mud reacted to GEP in Was: Etsy or Ebay? Now: When Should You Start Trying to Sell?   
    teardrop,
     
    Honestly.
     
    Nobody here has ever treated you that way. Nobody is trying to STOP anyone from making pottery. Everyone here is only trying to help you become a better potter. Sometimes that requires advice that is critical. That doesn't make it negative. The negativity is coming from you. You interpret everything you hear in the most negative way possible. I hope that someday when you are an experienced potter, you will recognize the value of that.
     
    Mea
  13. Downvote
    metal and mud reacted to catpaws in blow up   
    I'll try that, thanks. As far as using cones goes, nah course I didn't! ha ha I'm far too lazy for that, I just set the controller then go to bed!
  14. Downvote
    metal and mud reacted to catpaws in blow up   
    I'll try that, thanks. As far as using cones goes, nah course I didn't! ha ha I'm far too lazy for that, I just set the controller then go to bed!
  15. Like
    metal and mud reacted to Chris Campbell in A humbling insight.   
    If yedrow had just asked for different ways to do surface treatments it would have brought different answers, but this person seemed genuinely distressed that he/she could not master glazes to the extent that the pot was improved by his/her choices rather than ruined. The only way to 'master' glazing is to test various glazes until you find the fit for you. There are no magic short cuts.
    I don't think it would have been helpful to tell them to forget glazing when glazing is what they wanted to learn.
  16. Like
    metal and mud reacted to GMosko in A humbling insight.   
    I feel for you! There is no doubt that glazing is the most difficult part of the process. If you can buy a tiny test kiln, you can really go to town. But testing is honestly the best thing one can do to improve their knowledge and temper their perspective.
     
    At the moment, I am enjoying applying a wax resist on top of the glaze, and when dry, using a wide hake to paint on a mixture of stain and water. If the fire is good, everything will melt together and harmonize.
     
    Best of luck to you.








  17. Like
    metal and mud got a reaction from Cate Donoghue in Does Anyone Out There Truly Support Themselves With Their Ceramics/pottery?   
    What we are talking about here was published in a book called "The Secret" a few years ago. It is kind of dopey, but I got a lot out of it. Basically put, it rewrites the philosophy of "The Power of Positive Thinking." Think something will be a success, and it will, because you will make it so. If you get up in the morning and think "I'm going to have a bad day," guess what--you will!! Start small and it will grow into a life changer.
     
    Enough philosophy. A comment about selling at a market prompted me to contribute to this thread. I am still a newbie but enjoying the heck out of clay. I looked at my gathering collection of pieces and decided I needed to find them homes, not have them gather dust on shelves. So I got a business number, got approved to sell at our city Farmer's and Crafts Market, and I've actually been selling. Not a lot, but people "out there" seem to appreciate my work. I set out a little cobalt blue bowl last weekend, thinking it was clunky and no one would buy it because it didn't have art and grace and. . .whatever. . .but that is the bowl that sold that day! It was so interesting. I fully believe that each one of my pieces will be discovered by just the right person on just the right day--I just have to be at the Market. It's really fun and rewarding to see people admire my works, and say how pretty they are. Next week something else will be ready to be picked up by its new owner!! I just have to be patient.
  18. Like
    metal and mud reacted to Matt Oz in functional vs. sculptural   
    here's my opinion: I have never met a piece of clay that I didn't like, sculptural or functional, amateur or professional.
  19. Like
    metal and mud reacted to ayjay in When can you call yourself a potter?| Dec 26, 2011   
    Isn't just about everyone a potter?
     
    If you can make a pinch pot you are a potter.
     
    Some potters will make more aesthetically pleasing pots, some potters will make more commercially successful pots, (sometimes even mine turn out OK) but a pot is a pot.
  20. Like
    metal and mud reacted to trina in Introduction   
    Hi Trina--Sorry I didn't reply sooner, but I didn't check the post. A week has gone by, plus. I love your birds with nail legs!! They are so whimsical. The mosaic of the lily pads and fishes is very nice--how big is it? I have a similar project planned, one with large tiles carved to feature ginkgo leaves. I did a test plate and I like the way it turned out; haven't started to tackle something like your mosaic, or mural, or whatever it's called. Any pointers for me or others who would like to make a work like that? FYI, I took my pieces to our local Farmer's Market last Saturday and sold two little (2 inch) clay boxes. Only $20 in revenue, but it made me happy that someone liked my pieces enought to buy them. It also fueled my desire to go back. It's the Christmas Eve market this Saturday.
     
     
     
    Hey, Nice to hear from you. The gold fish pond is made with 12cm tiles and is high relief. It is more or less big enough to cover a side table to make a water feature in a dry area. I love making tiles the biggest tip I have is when you cut the tiles don't try moving them into postion until they are leathery hard and once you get working use a spray gun to keep everything moist. When I glazed them I first dipped them in the water colour glaze, wipped off the fish and lilly pads then used underglazes to paint the fish and pads then covered those with clear glaze. I think it gives the fish that nice translucent feeling of swimming particulary on the fins. I am currently working on an exhibition of what I call pods. One might interest you, it is called fire and is full of nails and wire. I have glazed it but am waiting for my kiln to get a bit fuller, and I have had the flue all this week so had to cancel work in the studio totally. I think it is great that you sold some work, it is always a kick, but remember if you are trying to become a professional potter (which I don't know) or just trying to support your hobby, Don't undercut your work which I am sure is great!!! If you have any questions that I can answer I will happily do so.... Trina
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