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LogicalHue

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  1. Like
    LogicalHue reacted to GEP in Pics "good enough" for Jury submission?   
    While you’re at the camera store, buy a can of Dulling Spray. Lightly mist the glossy areas of your pots. As others have noted, we can see the light tent clearly reflected in the pots, and it is very distracting. You can solve that by diffusing your light sources better, or by spraying your pots with Dulling Spray. Dulling Spray rinses off with water and won’t harm your pots. It’s often used on people’s eyeglasses for portraits. 
  2. Like
    LogicalHue got a reaction from LeeU in Pics "good enough" for Jury submission?   
    I'm not an expert in jury submissions but I have some expertise in photography. In my opinion these are almost good enough. Mostly the background isn't quite cutting it. I can see a crease running through a couple of the backgrounds, and its too wrinkly on the table. Someone else might have some alternatives to the background but I use professional seamless paper and don't have a lot of other ideas. The only other thing I've had some success with was shooting against a white wall with my pieces sitting on glass or a white surface, but that can bring in a lot of other issues.

    Your lighting is pretty good and that's often the toughest bit! The yellow and green bowl/cup is a little dark. The second to last photo has a very distinct dark oval reflected right in the middle that looks very strange to me. I can see that probably the same thing is happening in other photos but it doesn't bother me in the others.

    BTW, I love that blue bowl!
  3. Like
    LogicalHue reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in How to develop a sense of color?   
    Just to play devil’s advocate...why not just play with black and white? If you have a strong sense of form, maybe value changes will make more sense than colour to your brain. 
  4. Like
    LogicalHue reacted to Pres in Power caulk gun to extruder conversion   
    So my whining on another thread about dealing with "infirmaries" brought on a suggestion for extruding by Min.
     
      (IP: 173.180.69.79)         Posted Wednesday at 11:41 AM @Pres, how about using an electric caulking gun? Ryobi makes an inexpensive one ($40 in Canada)  500 lbs of push force. I know the battery and charger would be expensive but if you already have those?

    After about a week of thinking about it and researching, I spent part of an afternoon at a lumber/hardware store and came up with what I hoped would be a solution.
    I purchased the following:
     Length of 1 1/2" inside diameter plastic pipe.  Reduction collar Electric Caulk gun sold without battery One battery and charger kit At home, I cut the pipe to 81/4 ", as a standard caulk tube is 8 1/2 inches. I also cut off the end of the reducer, which gave me a collar to add to the end of the pipe. I also used a 1 1/2" hole saw to cut a Plexiglas plug to fit between the end of the plunger and clay,as a caulk tube has a plastic plug on it to keep caulk from getting to the plunger.  
    I then removed the plunger end from the toothed rod with the center screw, and then the screw that held the backing plate and the plastic plunger end together. Using my dremel with my drill, I set up a bit to grind/sand the metal and plastic to the 1 1/2" diameter extruder tube. Then replaced these back on the toothed rod.
    Well wedged clay was placed in the assembled extuder, the die on the end of the tube, the collar over top fitting on to the tube, then the clay( well wedged and rolled out to fit), and lastly the protection plate for the plunger with a little space in the end of the tube. Lastly the entire thing was placed into the caulk gun/clay extruder and within 3 minutes I had the three and a half lengths of handle around 8" long. So smooth, no cross lines from short pumps of the manual type handle, and so easy on my hands. Once again, Thanks to MIN!

    Caulk gun with battery

    8 1/4" X 1 1/2" diameter pipe, handle extruder die, collar made from reducer coupling, end for plunger of caulk gun

    Only change on Caulk gun was to grind/sand plunger end to fit into 1 1/2 ID pipe

    Plunger has a metal backer for plastic front, I separated both by removing center screw and side screw-simple.

    Set up for drill to change diameter of any pieces needed to be ground, cut smaller.

    Full tube of new power extruder gave me these teapot handles till the plunger was at the end of run
  5. Like
    LogicalHue got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in I "glaze" fired instead of bisque...   
    I did end up making a new set and glazing and firing both. The pre-vitrified pieces definitely had enough problems that they would have been unusable; one glaze crawled, one was just too thin, and on one of the insides the middle/bottom kept getting essentially cleaned off when I applied a new layer of underglaze and so it was awkwardly blank.

    Of course my favorite piece out of all of them was from the set that got messed up - one of them was perfect - but I can't use it because I need a set. Perhaps I'll just keep it, because I love it.

    Thanks for the help!
  6. Like
    LogicalHue got a reaction from Rae Reich in I "glaze" fired instead of bisque...   
    I did end up making a new set and glazing and firing both. The pre-vitrified pieces definitely had enough problems that they would have been unusable; one glaze crawled, one was just too thin, and on one of the insides the middle/bottom kept getting essentially cleaned off when I applied a new layer of underglaze and so it was awkwardly blank.

    Of course my favorite piece out of all of them was from the set that got messed up - one of them was perfect - but I can't use it because I need a set. Perhaps I'll just keep it, because I love it.

    Thanks for the help!
  7. Like
    LogicalHue reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Favourite craft show tools and tricks   
    Ok folks, so it’s that time of year when the craft show season is basically completely insane! This discussion was kind of getting going in another thread, but separate tips threads are always fun. So inquiring minds want to know:
    What are the handy things that make your life easier for all the hauling, packing, selling, etc? What do you take every time, and what are the genius soloutions you’ve come up with for all the little things that come up?
    Another poster mentioned the importance of a good hand truck or dolly, and I have to agree. It needs to be solid and have a large carrying capacity(7-800 lbs), and pneumatic tires (not the solid ones!). I prefer the convertible ones. 
    I also am fond of using small sandbags or bean bags to prop bowls on, so people can see the inside of a bowl or plate at a glance. They’re compact and one size fits all, as opposed to plate setters. 
    Lastly, I like Velcro strips to tame cords for the lighting displays, rather than zip ties. They’re reusable, and you don’t almost cut through your lamp cords with a questionable utility knife at the end of the show. 
    How about you?
  8. Like
    LogicalHue reacted to Min in Favourite craft show tools and tricks   
    Something super simple but took me years to think of is using little paper bags instead of newsprint to wrap mini pots in. I make 4 types of mini pots, used to wrap each one which was really time consuming, way faster just using little paper bags, especially when someone buys them in multiples.  I've started using paper lunch bags for mugs and things of that size too. (I still bag their purchases so they can be carried easily) 

  9. Like
    LogicalHue reacted to GEP in Do You Wrap Your Tools To Make Them More Comfortable To Hold?   
    Pipe insulation and rubber bands. I have not had any hand pain since. See a photo on my blog:
     
    http://www.goodelephant.com/blog/sometimes-pottery-hurts-part-2
  10. Like
    LogicalHue got a reaction from Zach in Startup Cost   
    I am currently awaiting my first glaze firing to finish in my new home studio. I bought everything new, I've never seen anything promising used (always models I'm not at all interested in, usually really old) but I know several people who do have their equipment used and it works great and was cheap. I (with some assistance) have spent almost $9000 on my business just this year. This includes the electric work, the kiln, kiln furniture, wheel, table, shelves and lots of odds and ends that add up.  I still want more things like a sink and a slab roller. This figure doesn't include things like my website or packaging or craft show supplies or photography equipment or most of my tools etc that I've purchased over the years, those will be fairly unique to what you hope to be doing anyway.
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