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GiselleNo5

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  1. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from LeeU in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    1. I predict that you will forget to wipe glaze off the bottom of a pot several times before you learn your lesson. 
    2. I predict that you will fail to test a new glaze properly before use because you're sure it's going to work "just fine". 
    3. I predict that you are going to go out into the studio ready for an evening out for just ONE MINUTE and come out with dusty or muddy handprints all over your nice clothes somehow even though you were really careful not to touch anything. 
    4. I predict that you will try to attach a handle, trim, or carve a piece when it is too dry and experience cracking, and be annoyed as if it was unexpected. 
    5. I predict that you will make people's eyes glaze over trying to share a spark of your fascination with the whole process. 
    6. I predict you will be impatient, open the kiln too soon, and suffer the consequences with crazed ware.
    7. I predict you will throw clay across the studio in frustration at least once when your throwing is off for some reason. 
    8. I predict that you will have people dismiss your blood, sweat, and tears after years of focused effort as a "gift" or a "talent". 
  2. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to glazenerd in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    Paul:
    Probably the most predictable, is a kiln under or over firing. When I got my first kiln, I just sorta automatically assumed it fired to the temperature programmed in the controller. After my first kiln load, where most of the pieces seemed a bit runny: I programmed a TC offset of 40 degrees. Now I checked my other kilns upon arrival, and cone every 10-12th. load to monitor changes.
     
    Actually, it is the predictability of the human endeavor; that is more relevant to daily life in clay.
     
    1. I predict you will get in a hurry and mess up a load or two, or 20 before your journey ends.
    2. I predict you will forget a glaze ingredient, grab the wrong colorant, or forget glaze entirely before a glaze firing.
    3. I predict you will lay in bed at night wondering what it was you forgot to somewhere in the process of pottery.
    4. I predict you will sneeze while trimming, and nearly cut the piece in half.
    5. I predict you will open the kiln and say: " what the hell was I thinking?"
    6. I predict you will become enamored by a forming, glazing, or firing technique to the point of near obsession.
    7. I predict you will become emotionally attached to some of your work,
    8. I predict some of your family members will hurt your feelings with their lack of enthusiasm about your beloved pot.
    9. I predict you will spend months and years finding " your voice."
    10. I predict satisfaction and contentment with your work, if you do not allow frustration to dissuade you.
     
    Nerd
  3. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Pres in Qotw: Can Creativity Be Taught Or Is It Something We Are Born With, And. .is Creativity Really Needed To Make Good Pottery?   
    Giselle,
    Fantastic painting, but much more of a true talent whether handicapped or not. The example I had was of a student that I had in school that we did the same sort of thing, after some research. However, back then there was not the internet that allowed information to be so readily accessible.
     
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  4. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from LeeU in Qotw: Can Creativity Be Taught Or Is It Something We Are Born With, And. .is Creativity Really Needed To Make Good Pottery?   
    I will answer this qotw when I have time to properly write a response. 
     
    In the meantime, I wanted to share this: https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/10351821_10152363243887134_721721534982706512_n.jpg?oh=528dd1eae5424d9797905d6fa9067e6f&oe=59C57D47
     
    This is painted by a friend of my parents'. He is color blind. He has all his colors coded carefully by shade, saturation, etc., and paints beautiful vibrant art. To me, the fact that he found a way to create these paintings for others to enjoy even though he can't fully appreciate what he is painting is incredible. His artwork is beautiful on its' own, but knowing that he is painting on faith kicks it up a notch for me. 
  5. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from glazenerd in Qotw: Can Creativity Be Taught Or Is It Something We Are Born With, And. .is Creativity Really Needed To Make Good Pottery?   
    I will answer this qotw when I have time to properly write a response. 
     
    In the meantime, I wanted to share this: https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/10351821_10152363243887134_721721534982706512_n.jpg?oh=528dd1eae5424d9797905d6fa9067e6f&oe=59C57D47
     
    This is painted by a friend of my parents'. He is color blind. He has all his colors coded carefully by shade, saturation, etc., and paints beautiful vibrant art. To me, the fact that he found a way to create these paintings for others to enjoy even though he can't fully appreciate what he is painting is incredible. His artwork is beautiful on its' own, but knowing that he is painting on faith kicks it up a notch for me. 
  6. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to glazenerd in Qotw: What Do You Listen To While Working In The Studio? Music, Tv, Talk Radio, Silence?   
    Hi Bea...... having lunch with me on the deck.. She is chewing by the way, not snarling.
     
    Nerd
  7. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to ChenowethArts in Qotw: What Do You Listen To While Working In The Studio? Music, Tv, Talk Radio, Silence?   
    General observations about sounds when I am working:
    If there isn't something playing on the radio and I am alone, the voice of the potter talking (occasionally cursing) to his clay may be the only sounds. The clay doesn't mind my pun-slinging and is OK with dad jokes. If the radio is on, it is more likely to be an oldies station.  Thankfully, I define oldie to include any number of classical symphonic works from the 18th and 19th centuries along with any number of 1960's an '70's groups with great horn sections. If I am outdoors and doing (mostly) hand-building...the sound of the waterfall in the pond or the crackle of the fire is all that I need....well, maybe accented by an aluminum can, pop-top-ahhhh combination. If the grands are in the studio with me, the only sounds that matter are the silly laughs that seem to extend right up to the time when a kiddo is siting on the side of the clay sink while Papa is spraying the signs of fun off of arms and legs. Peace,
    -Paul
  8. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Mark C. in "aggressive Cleaning" Of Ceramic Paint Palettes   
    Options
    A-bisque them then glaze them and fire them-plan for a smoky mess.
    B-toss them out and make new ones that are glazed fired with a gloss glaze
  9. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to rakukuku in Qotw: What Part Of Your Production Do You Feel Is The Most Creative Outlet In The Overall From Start To Finish. From The First Design , To Making, Dec   
    Probably the carving step of my hand building. My little figures are hand formed as pretty much pinch pots, then carved and refined after they set up a little. Really like the carving part. 
  10. Like
  11. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Qotw: What Part Of Your Production Do You Feel Is The Most Creative Outlet In The Overall From Start To Finish. From The First Design , To Making, Dec   
    I think the most creative part of my work is in experimenting and tweaking each design till I get it just the way I want it. Sure, making the form is creative; carving; glazing; it's all creative. But the time my wheels are really turning is when I develop a new design.
     
    First I try Plan A, and say it is a 40/100 for how I wanted it to look. I figure out what is not fitting, and why; then I think of what I can try next to get closer. I cannot wait to get back in there and try something new. The following plans can actually be a step back; for example (before I started using my own work daily to test it) I was so worried that the bare clay would soak up oils and stains that I was glazing it in clear which really ruined the whole look and feel of the piece for me. That generation was Plan D and I would say I went from a 70/100 to a 20/100 with that load. Fortunately I discovered that my clay is really well vitrified and the pieces I've used daily, left in dishwater, set down in grease, you name it, are still beautiful and fresh and look new. 
     
    Whether I'm taking one step forward or two steps back, this is the stage when I can't stop thinking about what I'm working on now and tomorrow, when I wake up groping for a pen to sketch out an idea before I lose it, when I am itching to go and make work. I was trying to figure out how to get clear sharp lines for my grass that I didn't have to glaze hairline by hairline; woke up bolt upright one morning remembering a technique of wax resist mishima with underglaze and knew that was it. I still use that technique on over 75% of what I make. 
  12. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from glazenerd in Qotw: What Part Of Your Production Do You Feel Is The Most Creative Outlet In The Overall From Start To Finish. From The First Design , To Making, Dec   
    I think the most creative part of my work is in experimenting and tweaking each design till I get it just the way I want it. Sure, making the form is creative; carving; glazing; it's all creative. But the time my wheels are really turning is when I develop a new design.
     
    First I try Plan A, and say it is a 40/100 for how I wanted it to look. I figure out what is not fitting, and why; then I think of what I can try next to get closer. I cannot wait to get back in there and try something new. The following plans can actually be a step back; for example (before I started using my own work daily to test it) I was so worried that the bare clay would soak up oils and stains that I was glazing it in clear which really ruined the whole look and feel of the piece for me. That generation was Plan D and I would say I went from a 70/100 to a 20/100 with that load. Fortunately I discovered that my clay is really well vitrified and the pieces I've used daily, left in dishwater, set down in grease, you name it, are still beautiful and fresh and look new. 
     
    Whether I'm taking one step forward or two steps back, this is the stage when I can't stop thinking about what I'm working on now and tomorrow, when I wake up groping for a pen to sketch out an idea before I lose it, when I am itching to go and make work. I was trying to figure out how to get clear sharp lines for my grass that I didn't have to glaze hairline by hairline; woke up bolt upright one morning remembering a technique of wax resist mishima with underglaze and knew that was it. I still use that technique on over 75% of what I make. 
  13. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Email Marketing, Facebook, Instagram   
    I know about Pinterest through my own heavy use of it 4 years ago. Interestingly enough, it's how I found this forum. It's like crack cocaine for the visually fascinated.
     
    Statistically, Pinterest is king for sales. It's basically where women, who are in charge of most household budgets, go to get ideas and daydream about home improvements, clothing and other things they want to buy at some point. It's a massive visual search engine full of the ideal life you covet heavily. And Mason jars. (Ball brand, for all you south of the border.)
     
    Remember that one lady that succesfully auctioned off a single mug on Instagram for over $500 USD last year? She developed her primary social media following on Pinterest (she showed up in my feed pretty much constantly). She gets absolutely lambasted in academic circles for the nature of her work, and I don't think she cares at all. If I could pull that much for one mug, I might not either! She's also cited as a major arguement against emerging artists, who are likely more social media-savvy than older generations, using an antiquated gallery system as a viable part of a professional practice meant to feed and house yourself.
     
    All that said...
    It's 1) only good if you know how to use it properly, and 2) bloody time consuming to do effectively, because it involves a bunch of repinning yourself in order to up your relevancy, and some influencer marketing as well. It's all about building social capital, and it involves an investment in time and education.
     
    If you have no affinity for social media marketing, it will probably never be your thing, and I think if it makes you uncomfortable, it's never going to be a good fit, and you should make better use of your time. And social media doesn't make sense for folks like Mark, who have already built their audience, unless you want to use it as a medium to keep in contact. For those of us still trying to find our crowd and build our purchasing audience, it's a tool in the box that's worth looking at and trying. It's been observed that the pottery business landscape is very different for those starting out now than it was 30 or 40 years ago. Some things, like professionalism, perseverance and building sustainably are timeless, but the internet is most definitely a non-optional part of that.
  14. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to glazenerd in Storing Glaze Chemicals   
    Lithium carbonate is one exception to what lady said. It should be stored in a glass container because it's high alkalinity will leach plastic. Spodumene and petalite do not need this consideration. Strong sunlight will also degrade lithium carb., causing it to lose potentency over an extended period.
    Nerd
  15. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Min in Pkqw: Week 12 (Can You Believe It!)   
    I have had trouble with all the other quizzes of the week and what topic do I feel confident enough to participate in? Surface decoration. LOL That is so revealing. You can tell where my heart lies. 
  16. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Pugaboo in Would You Sell Pottery That Has A Tiny Crack In The Glaze In A Few Places?   
    I agree with everything said.
    I always ask myself these things...
    Would I buy this myself if I saw it somewhere?
    Would I want my Mother using these things?
    Do I feel confident in the thought that it is safe for a child to use. (Being breakable does not count as unsafe, since a pottery can break but everything else qualifies)
     
    If I don't like my own answers to these questions I don't sell the pieces.
     
    You have to decide at what level you feel comfortable with. I highly recommend insurance to protect yourself.
     
    T
  17. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Mark (Marko) Madrazo in Qotw:what Is Your Favorite Part Of Your Most Favorite Glaze And Why?   
    I saw a video recently of someone fixing drip lines with their finger wrapped in plastic and dipped in water, I believe. I'll see if I can find it again and DM it to you. 
  18. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to glazenerd in Qotw:what Were The Early Warning Signs That You Were Interested In Making Art, Being Artistically Creative, At A Young Age (Under 18)?   
    After thinking about this question for a day: got nada, zip- zilch. I think that is due to the fact that I am not, nor ever been an artistic person. I did the water color, finger painting, and paint by number kits; that most have done in their youth. Yet, I do not recall any distinct memory at excelling, or even enjoying any of it. Now that I have finally crossed over the sixty plus mark; I am just now finding an interest in art. However, I have always loved and appreciated art. I have visited many museums, galleries and shows over the years. Have even dropped some coins on some paintings that I thought were of an excellent quality.
     
    Now if you want to include problem solving and creative thinking into this equation: I am an artist. If you want to include a perfectly formulated clay body; then yes. All a matter of perspective I suppose. I do however find a perfectly formulated clay body to be a work of art. Now that I think about it: I do recall playing with play- dough as a child.
     
    Tom
  19. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Qotw:what Were The Early Warning Signs That You Were Interested In Making Art, Being Artistically Creative, At A Young Age (Under 18)?   
    My first love was actually writing. I've always loved to read and always had a vivid imagination, so I've been making up and acting out stories for as long as I can remember. I was always bouncing around with what job I wanted to do but every single one was creative, from writer, to singer, to actress, to teacher, to photographer, to fashion designer ...... the list is very long. I was always changing my mind. It all may seem unrelated but in reality it has always been about what I can make with my hands and also about how I can communicate and connect with others. For awhile I was even on the path to becoming an ASL interpreter, which fits those criteria as well. 
     
    Pottery is the first art I've ever been drawn to that has fit me like a glove and the more I do it, the more I want to do it. Also every other creative outlet I've ever tried is feeding into it. 
     
    Also if you've ever seen the wildflowers that I carve and paint onto my pots .... ever since I was probably eight or nine I have been drawing scribbly scenes of grass and wildflowers along the bottom and borders of my notebook paper. I had forgotten about that until I came across some old papers. Patterns repeat over and over even when we don't realize it. 
  20. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from LeeU in Qotw:what Were The Early Warning Signs That You Were Interested In Making Art, Being Artistically Creative, At A Young Age (Under 18)?   
    My first love was actually writing. I've always loved to read and always had a vivid imagination, so I've been making up and acting out stories for as long as I can remember. I was always bouncing around with what job I wanted to do but every single one was creative, from writer, to singer, to actress, to teacher, to photographer, to fashion designer ...... the list is very long. I was always changing my mind. It all may seem unrelated but in reality it has always been about what I can make with my hands and also about how I can communicate and connect with others. For awhile I was even on the path to becoming an ASL interpreter, which fits those criteria as well. 
     
    Pottery is the first art I've ever been drawn to that has fit me like a glove and the more I do it, the more I want to do it. Also every other creative outlet I've ever tried is feeding into it. 
     
    Also if you've ever seen the wildflowers that I carve and paint onto my pots .... ever since I was probably eight or nine I have been drawing scribbly scenes of grass and wildflowers along the bottom and borders of my notebook paper. I had forgotten about that until I came across some old papers. Patterns repeat over and over even when we don't realize it. 
  21. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Mark C. in Qotw:what Is Your Favorite Part Of Your Most Favorite Glaze And Why?   
    This software is getting really hard to add a photo-It took me many trys -I have added so many over the years-something is new
  22. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Denice in Qotw:what Were The Early Warning Signs That You Were Interested In Making Art, Being Artistically Creative, At A Young Age (Under 18)?   
    When I was about 5 years old someone gave my  mother  a kit that had a metal platter, broken tile, mastic and grout.  I saw it laying around and asked her about it, she explained it to me but didn't want to do it.  I wanted to so she decided to do it together, I remember sitting on her lap while we glued tile down together,  one of my best memories of her. After that I gave up dolls and just wanted craft kits for my birthday and Christmas  presents.   When I was in 7th grade I was in my first art class and the teacher thought I was very talented and encouraged me to stick with the arts.  Denice
  23. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to oceancity in Can I Set Up A Studio In My Spare Bedroom?   
    Thank you!
     
    I'm feeling better about my options now. I just get very nervous about silica dust or other hazardous dust because I feel that I've been pretty careless in the past. I'm worried I'll give myself silicosis. I haven't had any issues at all with my lungs, but it's a scary thought.
     
    I think at the very least I will put some kind of waterproof flooring or tarp under my wheel throwing area, in case of spills. I should be able to use a wet mop or sponge to clean the rest of the floor.
  24. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Qotw: What’S Your Family Like?   
    When I was young my parents (especially my mom) really emphasized being practical and making sure that I went into a line of work where I could make an income to support myself rather than all the creative things I enjoyed like writing, dance, photography. I went through a bit of a crisis when my son was born and I quit my job to stay home with him. Suddenly for the first time since I was a teenager, I was not making a full income but making bits and pieces here and there just to contribute. He was two when I found pottery and despite trying to talk myself out of doing it, which I felt was self-indulgent and expensive and impractical, I kept finding ways to keep my fingers in clay without spending any money in the beginning. 
     
    To my very great surprise, my uber-practical no-nonsense father revealed that he had wanted to start a pottery business for the past ten years, ever since he had made tropical fish tiles at a community studio for the front of their house. He has become one of my pottery buddies. He set up a kiln and that is still where I fire; he bought a wheel and with nowhere to put it at his place, it lives in my studio. Whenever I have a show he comes and helps set up without being asked, and he has lent me money for pottery equipment several times, gone on long drives with me to pick up Craigslist finds, and allowed me free use of everything he has from glazes to equipment. He doesn't say much about my work to me, just quietly inspects everything as I unload it, and occasionally saying that something came out "real nice". His support is in actions not in words but there is an enormous amount of it and it's rock-solid.
     
    My mom is an extremely talented artist and I've always known that since I was a kid. I used to watch her make drawings of cartoon characters for us and they were amazing recreations. My attempts were always pitiful by my own comparison. She comes by my studio now and wistfully talks about learning to throw, or coming over to make little sculptures, but she has only come once to work on a project despite an open invitation to come anytime. I have come to realize that all the warnings she gave me as a child about how impractical it is to have a creative job were her own worries and perhaps the worries of her parents about HER pursuing her artistic enthusiasms.
     
    I'm very grateful that my parents showed me by example from childhood on that making something yourself is almost always an option, and almost always better than anything you can buy. We didn't have a TV till I was a teenager so we used to craft paint T-shirts, tie die, draw, make dollhouses, sew, cook, play in the mud, and read. 
  25. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to oldlady in What Exactly Did I Buy?   
    HOORAY FOR TERRY!      no going back now, you are at the edge of the rabbit hole.  careful, do not fall in too deep.
     
    the giffin grip is a newer one so you got a deal on that.  the amounts of ingredients are less than ideal but you haven't yet decided which glaze recipe to use so it is good to have all that variety.  to have them all at home and not have to go out to shop is worth a lot. when you are ready to set up the giffin grip, not geffen or griffon or whatever spellcheck says, call me.
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