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GiselleNo5

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  1. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from LindaSkipper in Charging For Prop Wares   
    ^^^ THIS WHOLE ENTIRE POST. I agree with it. Out of positive votes for the day.  
  2. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to GEP in Charging For Prop Wares   
    I agree with Chris. Ask for permission to use the photos in your own marketing. And get the agreement in writing. Professional photographs can have a lot of impact on your website, business cards, maybe a banner for your booth.
     
    I would hand them a thumb drive and say "here you can put them on this."
  3. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Chris Campbell in Charging For Prop Wares   
    I would rather get written permission to use the photos forever ... not ask for a few bucks now.
     
    Added later ...
    I say this based on the original description of the person requesting the work ...
     
    >I recently had a prominent food prop stylist / writer / taste maker request using my products for photo shoot.
  4. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to LeeU in Qotw: How Do You Identify Pottery?   
    I can very generally rely on what I (think) I know from experience, education, and exposure, to date, discerning among, as Marcia notes,  "... stoneware. earthenware, salt glazed, wood fired, raku  to electric mid-high fire..." in the fairly common pottery that crosses my path. But my knowledge is way too rudimentary to discern identifiers in "high touch" ware, such as John's example of Yixing teapots, and I have limited exposure to ceramics as it is. I do get a kick out of being able to be pretty certain about a technique, a firing method, a clay body, a glaze etc., just to dazzle my non-clay-making friends who know "nothing" and therefore think I know "something" LOL.
  5. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to oldlady in Qotw: How Do You Identify Pottery?   
    callie and giselle, if you look at the second picture closely, you can see the texture at the edges of the bowl.  the crack runs through an area in the center where a flaw can be seen.  this whole pot is extremely thin and lightweight, i can see the possibility of a woven basket bowl being used as a model for a plaster slump mold.  the thinness suggests a very quickly emptied pouring mold.  the interior shows that it had been dipped in the glaze because of the runs where the pot was placed on its foot to dry.
     
    all i know is that it knocked my socks off when i found it.  i happily gave my $1 to the cashier and said i would take it as is, no wrapping in paper or putting it into a bag.  it rode home nestled in a huge bath towel on the floor behind my seat in the car.
     
    sure wish someone knows what it is.
  6. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Pres in Qotw: How Do You Identify Pottery?   
    I do believe in honesty with ones work, whether it be for sale to a customer, as a gift to a friend, or and entry into a show. The onus here is to represent yourself as you are. If you are a decorator, so be it, a wheel thrower, that too, a handbuilder-certainly, but in the end don't present yourself as something you are not. Like the bad pot that you sold, your identity could come back and bite you. I like to sleep well at night, to do otherwise would not allow me to.
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  7. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Roberta12 in Qotw: I Have Questions About Resiliency. . . .   
    I was about 3 years into pottery and had a great idea for some wall pieces.  Very simple, but colorful, something that could hang on a patio.  I drew them out, colored, sketched, made patterns, and began making my idea!  I was so excited!!!  But every time I fired one of the pieces, it would break, crack, I could not get any success whatsoever.  I remember sitting outside the community studio, very discouraged.  My friend/teacher at the time, came along and explained it was the design of the piece.  Too flat, too large.  Once I pulled myself together, I began reading about firing large, flat pieces and what considerations a person should keep in mind.  It was a turning point for me.  1.  I then realized how much information is out there about ceramics and that a person could completely immerse themself in study for the rest of their life and 2.  I could solve this problem, and I did with simply design changes. 
     
    I do feel that to spend time in pottery (either hobby or professional) you have to be not only resilient but a creative problem solver.  They go hand in hand. 
     
    Marcia and Giselle both brought up a good point about illness, tragedy, and the flat parts of life.....  at times you need to do like Giselle said and put it in the crock pot (love that!  because that is what I do also) or go at it from a different direction......Good points, both of you!
     
    Roberta
  8. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Marcia Selsor in Qotw: I Have Questions About Resiliency. . . .   
    There will always be setbacks..some worse than others: serious illness, flood, tornadoes,carpal tunnel, divorce, death of loved one, 
    ###### happens. But resiliency is probably measured individually as we all have to figure out how to deal with it. Some need support more than others. 
    Good communities help. Good friends and family help. But it is the individual strength that is the final measure. Each setback makes us stronger. IMHO. I had a medical doctor taking classes from me and he said "if he makes a mistake here, nobody dies".
    Nobody said it was going to be an easy ride.
    I think I've had too many setbacks to count over the decades, just move on to the next thing.
     
    Marcia
  9. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Qotw: I Have Questions About Resiliency. . . .   
    I haven't been making pots for very long but I will share my experience so far. 
     
    I do tend to take a week or two out of the studio if I'm discouraged. I'm coming to realize this isn't necessarily a bad thing as sometimes I need time to regroup. I used to do a lot of huge sewing projects and I learned then that if I came up against a problem or made a mistake and I couldn't see a way around it, GO TO BED. Often I would wake up with the solution clear in my mind while if I continued working I would make the situation worse. With ceramics it is very similar, but it takes me a bit longer to figure things out. But I call it "putting it into the Crock-Pot". I think fully through a problem and then go do something else and often the next step pops into my mind without warning and without any further effort. 
     
    Last year I had a crazy busy successful two-weekend show. I started stocking up for it only perhaps 4-6 weeks ahead and for about a month I didn't sleep more than four hours a night, from a combination of too much to do and huge amounts of stress. Earlier in the year I had four kiln loads in a row that were almost entirely trash and though I had made adjustments to fix the issues, I was having nightmares that it would happen again with no time to make replacement work for the show. I intended to take two weeks off but I was so burnt out and exhausted that I proceeded to get three or four colds in a row and ended up being out of the studio for three full months. As it was winter (which doesn't get too cold here but is chilly, and my garage is uninsulated) every time I would go into the studio and start working I couldn't handle what the cold did to my lungs and I would be quickly driven out. This year I am taking that same show which is in October very seriously and I'm already about 1/3 stocked up for it. I started working on this in the beginning of the summer this time. 
    I'm a little slow sometimes but the goal is to learn from the mistakes and not repeat them TOO closely. 
     
    I have also learned that making custom work or made-to-order items sucks all the enjoyment out of it for me, so I just say no to everyone, kindly and firmly. 
  10. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Roberta12 in Qotw: I Have Questions About Resiliency. . . .   
    I haven't been making pots for very long but I will share my experience so far. 
     
    I do tend to take a week or two out of the studio if I'm discouraged. I'm coming to realize this isn't necessarily a bad thing as sometimes I need time to regroup. I used to do a lot of huge sewing projects and I learned then that if I came up against a problem or made a mistake and I couldn't see a way around it, GO TO BED. Often I would wake up with the solution clear in my mind while if I continued working I would make the situation worse. With ceramics it is very similar, but it takes me a bit longer to figure things out. But I call it "putting it into the Crock-Pot". I think fully through a problem and then go do something else and often the next step pops into my mind without warning and without any further effort. 
     
    Last year I had a crazy busy successful two-weekend show. I started stocking up for it only perhaps 4-6 weeks ahead and for about a month I didn't sleep more than four hours a night, from a combination of too much to do and huge amounts of stress. Earlier in the year I had four kiln loads in a row that were almost entirely trash and though I had made adjustments to fix the issues, I was having nightmares that it would happen again with no time to make replacement work for the show. I intended to take two weeks off but I was so burnt out and exhausted that I proceeded to get three or four colds in a row and ended up being out of the studio for three full months. As it was winter (which doesn't get too cold here but is chilly, and my garage is uninsulated) every time I would go into the studio and start working I couldn't handle what the cold did to my lungs and I would be quickly driven out. This year I am taking that same show which is in October very seriously and I'm already about 1/3 stocked up for it. I started working on this in the beginning of the summer this time. 
    I'm a little slow sometimes but the goal is to learn from the mistakes and not repeat them TOO closely. 
     
    I have also learned that making custom work or made-to-order items sucks all the enjoyment out of it for me, so I just say no to everyone, kindly and firmly. 
  11. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from terrim8 in Qotw: I Have Questions About Resiliency. . . .   
    I haven't been making pots for very long but I will share my experience so far. 
     
    I do tend to take a week or two out of the studio if I'm discouraged. I'm coming to realize this isn't necessarily a bad thing as sometimes I need time to regroup. I used to do a lot of huge sewing projects and I learned then that if I came up against a problem or made a mistake and I couldn't see a way around it, GO TO BED. Often I would wake up with the solution clear in my mind while if I continued working I would make the situation worse. With ceramics it is very similar, but it takes me a bit longer to figure things out. But I call it "putting it into the Crock-Pot". I think fully through a problem and then go do something else and often the next step pops into my mind without warning and without any further effort. 
     
    Last year I had a crazy busy successful two-weekend show. I started stocking up for it only perhaps 4-6 weeks ahead and for about a month I didn't sleep more than four hours a night, from a combination of too much to do and huge amounts of stress. Earlier in the year I had four kiln loads in a row that were almost entirely trash and though I had made adjustments to fix the issues, I was having nightmares that it would happen again with no time to make replacement work for the show. I intended to take two weeks off but I was so burnt out and exhausted that I proceeded to get three or four colds in a row and ended up being out of the studio for three full months. As it was winter (which doesn't get too cold here but is chilly, and my garage is uninsulated) every time I would go into the studio and start working I couldn't handle what the cold did to my lungs and I would be quickly driven out. This year I am taking that same show which is in October very seriously and I'm already about 1/3 stocked up for it. I started working on this in the beginning of the summer this time. 
    I'm a little slow sometimes but the goal is to learn from the mistakes and not repeat them TOO closely. 
     
    I have also learned that making custom work or made-to-order items sucks all the enjoyment out of it for me, so I just say no to everyone, kindly and firmly. 
  12. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to GEP in Quck Resolution Of Copyright Infringement On Etsy   
    A design patent could be a double-edged sword for a handmade pottery business. It might encourage you to not evolve your work, because you've invested so much in the patent and don't want to stray outside of the protected area. And I agree with John, enforcing your patent will still be very expensive.
  13. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to GEP in Quck Resolution Of Copyright Infringement On Etsy   
    You're right, the functional/utilitarian aspects are so ubiquitously shared that they are not copyrightable. Copyrightable elements must be original and distinctive, and provable that they are your original idea. 
     
    For example, I make a lot of canisters with an elephant-shaped handle on their lids. This is a fairly specific idea, but I don't consider it to be copyrightable. It's still too broad, I have no idea if I did it first, and there are an endless number of ways to take this concept and execute an original design from it. The idea is only one component of the design, not the gestalt of the design. 
     
    By contrast, in the example I am referring to above (again I'm trying to keep the details confidential), another potter attempted to replicate a complete design of mine, from top to bottom, including quite a few specific and original details. Then named the pot with the same name I use for mine. 
     
    I can think of some potters who have developed such a unique "look" to their work, including specific details that are original to them, and done a fabulous job marketing their work so that the "look" and the potter's name have become recognizable. If another potter tried to capitalize off of this by attempting to sell copies of the work, the original potter would have a copyright claim. By "look" I suppose I am mostly referring to surface decoration ideas, not forms. But there can be original ideas that are 3-dimensional but still part of the "look" rather than the function. Martha Grover's work comes to mind. A lot of her design elements are 3-d, but still very original and distinctive. 
  14. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to GEP in Quck Resolution Of Copyright Infringement On Etsy   
    I lost interest a long time ago in trying to convince people like this (who have demonstrated their tendency for self-absorbtion) to change their behavior. The hurt feelings and backlash are not worth the hassle. I've learned that trying to be nice or sensitive about it only convinces the other person that it wasn't wrong. When I have the right to swing a decisive and non-personal axe, I swing it.
  15. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to GEP in Quck Resolution Of Copyright Infringement On Etsy   
    In the U.S., nothing official needs to be done in order to establish your copyrights. If there is a dispute, you just need to be able to prove that the work is yours, and when you made it. It's another good reason to take and catalog pictures of your work.
  16. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to glazenerd in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    "Maybe we identify just one predictable crisis and then have the forum describe the symptoms and how they moved forward?"
     
    Let me identify crystalline glaze as the most unpredictable glaze, first of all. Now let me give you the predictable reactions to the crisis this glaze causes. Hair loss, loss of appetite, sleeplessness, irrationality, moodiness, fits of rage; followed my maniac episodes of depression. Every once in awhile, you get to celebrate a victory over the glaze dragon.
     
    How to move forward: give up, sell your kiln, by premix, and blame it on chronic illness. OR. Line your kiln with rubber padding, so you have a softer place to bang your head. For me, after three years of therapy: the hand tremors have almost stopped, and my left eye twitches only on occasion. I order lithium carbonate in double batches: half for the glaze, the other half
     
    Nerd
  17. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    No one has listed my favorite predictable crisis yet so I will list it.
     
    Your glazing and in a rush and you think, oh will just do this and this and glaze this with this glaze and layer that and see what happens.
     
    You open the kiln and go oh man this is magical. Wait... did I take notes on this? %&!)* What did I put on this in what order and how. Then you spend a good year randomly putting stuff on test pots and writing it down hoping to one day open the magical pot... but you never do. 
     
    How to move forward:
     
    Take pictures and make notes of before and after!
  18. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Chris Campbell in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    When people ask me how I handle breakage I usually say ( with a smile ) that if a person cannot handle broken pots they should take up another hobby. I cannot come close to being able to count the number of times important pieces broke.
     
    Three quickly come to mind . .
    Someone accidentally backing their car over multiple ware-boards filled with almost finished work.
    Having a triptich ready to go out the door to the Gallery for a show and someone knocking one piece to the floor. Yes, the middle piece so I could not hope to fake it. Re-made the whole thing in three days as matching would have been impossible.
    Opening a needed kiln load to find all twenty pieces glazed firmly to the top shelf.
     
    Moving forward ...
    well, after a few moments of ?@!#Â¥*~@!!? .... and a deep breath ... you just clean up the mess and start over.
     
    I truly believe the ability to adapt and move forward is the main determining factor for a long life in the arts ... the ability to pick yourself up and try again is much more important than talent. One of the more talented artists I have met was totally unable to recover from a set back and has not worked since ... such a waste as he truly had a magical gift.
  19. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to LeeU in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    Predictable crisis: the inevitability of a smashed load of valued pieces. Symptoms? Moving forward? 
  20. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from LeeU in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    1. I predict that you will forget to wipe glaze off the bottom of a pot several times before you learn your lesson. 
    2. I predict that you will fail to test a new glaze properly before use because you're sure it's going to work "just fine". 
    3. I predict that you are going to go out into the studio ready for an evening out for just ONE MINUTE and come out with dusty or muddy handprints all over your nice clothes somehow even though you were really careful not to touch anything. 
    4. I predict that you will try to attach a handle, trim, or carve a piece when it is too dry and experience cracking, and be annoyed as if it was unexpected. 
    5. I predict that you will make people's eyes glaze over trying to share a spark of your fascination with the whole process. 
    6. I predict you will be impatient, open the kiln too soon, and suffer the consequences with crazed ware.
    7. I predict you will throw clay across the studio in frustration at least once when your throwing is off for some reason. 
    8. I predict that you will have people dismiss your blood, sweat, and tears after years of focused effort as a "gift" or a "talent". 
  21. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Pugaboo in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    I need to read Pres' original post more carefully! 

    If I was going to choose just one predictable crisis it would be getting glazes right. I use commercial glaze so the mixing and testing challenge is not there. However using even a premixed glaze does not get guaranteed results, and when you mix it yourself there is a whole new field of potential mistakes to make. Of all the crises I've had with ceramics in the past three years or so, the closest I came to quitting altogether was last year when I started using a whole batch of new glazes, glazes I'd mixed myself, etc., and did not test them adequately because I got cocky and thought I knew what I was doing. Four kiln loads in a row were ruined or mostly ruined because of this. The worst was that after the first kiln load I made changes each time and the work was still coming out badly. It began to feel like I was never going to get it right. Finally I slowed myself down, took the time to do test tiles with different thicknesses of glaze, and invested in brushing medium for some of the glazes that I just could NOT get right with dipping. It's 18 months later and I'm finally ready to try again with dipping or pouring. This time, though, I'm going to TEST MY GLAZES. That small amount of extra time that it will take me will pay off hugely in work saved.
     
    I see many other beginners making this same mistake, especially it seems when they are using commercial glazes. When you are making your own you know you have to test them and you get used to it. People don't realize, any glaze you're using you have to "learn". I know every one of my glazes inside out at this point. I know how many coats they want me to put on, I know where they like to be put in the kiln, I know what they'll look like with one, two, three, and four coats. And yet, guess what. Last month I ruined half a dozen pieces because ... shocker ... I used a glaze that I had tested on my white clay but not on my red and was not prepared for the strange results I got on the red. TEST TEST TEST. And then test some more. It's some of the least popular advice you can get or give (along with PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE) but it's extremely valuable nonetheless. 
  22. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Roberta12 in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    1. I predict that you will forget to wipe glaze off the bottom of a pot several times before you learn your lesson. 
    2. I predict that you will fail to test a new glaze properly before use because you're sure it's going to work "just fine". 
    3. I predict that you are going to go out into the studio ready for an evening out for just ONE MINUTE and come out with dusty or muddy handprints all over your nice clothes somehow even though you were really careful not to touch anything. 
    4. I predict that you will try to attach a handle, trim, or carve a piece when it is too dry and experience cracking, and be annoyed as if it was unexpected. 
    5. I predict that you will make people's eyes glaze over trying to share a spark of your fascination with the whole process. 
    6. I predict you will be impatient, open the kiln too soon, and suffer the consequences with crazed ware.
    7. I predict you will throw clay across the studio in frustration at least once when your throwing is off for some reason. 
    8. I predict that you will have people dismiss your blood, sweat, and tears after years of focused effort as a "gift" or a "talent". 
  23. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Pres in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    I predict that if you are a frequent reader here, you are lost, as you are already addicted to clay.
     
    I predict that as you get older you will have learned how little you really know, and how little time you have to learn the rest.
     
    I predict that as you get older you will also find that you are more efficient in your movement making up for much that you have lost in strength.
     
    I predict that much of your youth was spent learning from others when not sure of yourself, and that in the future your confidence will allow you to learn and teach with humility.
     
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  24. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Chris Campbell in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    - I predict you will hit creative walls ... dry spots ... and doubt your future in clay.
     
    The advice is to ride it out ... do other creative things, visit museums, check out other mediums ... the cycle will turn. So, try to relax and go with it. Much more pleasant. But ... your studio should not close down and wait for inspiration ... go into the studio. If you can't work then clean it ... or read a pottery book in there ... or organize it.
     
    - I predict you will follow ideas down some pretty useless rabbit holes as well as to some wonderful discoveries.
    - If you do craft shows, I predict you will spend some hours wondering "what on earth am I doing here?"
  25. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Chris Campbell in Qotw: Maybe We Identify Just One Predictable Crisis And Then Have The Forum Describe The Symptoms And How They Moved Forward?   
    1. I predict that you will forget to wipe glaze off the bottom of a pot several times before you learn your lesson. 
    2. I predict that you will fail to test a new glaze properly before use because you're sure it's going to work "just fine". 
    3. I predict that you are going to go out into the studio ready for an evening out for just ONE MINUTE and come out with dusty or muddy handprints all over your nice clothes somehow even though you were really careful not to touch anything. 
    4. I predict that you will try to attach a handle, trim, or carve a piece when it is too dry and experience cracking, and be annoyed as if it was unexpected. 
    5. I predict that you will make people's eyes glaze over trying to share a spark of your fascination with the whole process. 
    6. I predict you will be impatient, open the kiln too soon, and suffer the consequences with crazed ware.
    7. I predict you will throw clay across the studio in frustration at least once when your throwing is off for some reason. 
    8. I predict that you will have people dismiss your blood, sweat, and tears after years of focused effort as a "gift" or a "talent". 
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