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Colby Charpentier

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  1. Like
    Colby Charpentier reacted to Chris Campbell in Pricing For Beginner's Piece   
    One aspect that might influence your decision would be ... Where do the profits from the sale of the work go?
    If say, you get half and the school gets half then think of it as contributing to your school's future.
     
    If it's for 100% profit to you ... then you just have to consider if you want that piece out in the world with your name on it. Is it worth the $40-$50 you might feel comfortable charging?
     
    You are 100% correct ... it is your opinion that counts when considering the sale of your work. You are most likely correct in your judgement of the piece.
     
    Good luck with your pottery future! : - )
  2. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from bciskepottery in Calcium Borate   
    https://cfileonline.org/crystal-tile-london-contemporary-ceramic-art/
  3. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Why Handmade Ceramics Are White Hot (Nytimes)   
    Yes. He is arguing that the NY Times as an entity, wholly ignores American studio ceramics. When McKeough locks onto these "romantic" tales of the white collar businessman finding ceramics, it sells the story, not necessarily good work. In the Fashion and Style section, one can see Clark has an expectation of critical design writing, not inspirational story-telling. His anger is well-placed in this sense.
     
    What I do find objectionable is the exclusionary attitude of American studio ceramics. You can read this into Clark's writing, but this attitude underpins most avenues of dissemination for contemporary American studio ceramics (e.g. buddy-buddy deals, mis-guided gallery curation, and the incestuous nature of certain pedigrees). This is too much to discuss on this board, but is fair to acknowledge as a counterpoint to Clark's stance. It is also fair to note Garth Clark's personal stake in defending his position as an expert on American Ceramics verses "amateur hour" (Tim McKeough).
     
     
    The comparison that Clark draws is a direct result of his frustration with the lack of promotion for his favorite brand of American studio ceramics (and perhaps design editors encroaching on his area of expertise). But, the NY Times made its choice, and Clark's comparison is necessary to expression of his frustration. Your suggestion that Alleghany Meadows and Forrest Lewinger exist on different planes is probably true. They likely don't have to compete at all for their sales audience. However, they do have to compete for the NY Times endorsement. Which is one hell of a sales engine. It's a responsibility too. The question becomes whether the NY Times Style and Fashion section should be selling the best of contemporary American ceramics, or romantic "pipe dreams" of the white collar worker. It's easy to read my preference, but that's an editorial decision (subject to the agenda of the editor). Clark might as well argue that the NY Times is a trash newspaper. Which might be true.
     
    Bill Rogers' attempt to diffuse Clark's article, represents incongruence in the direction of Cfile. And at some point, one has to realize that there's not big enough of an audience to publish decent critical discourse on ceramics in America. For now, just enjoy the half-baked opinions of any publication covering American Ceramics. Any energy wasted on this discussion would be far better used in pursuit of making better work.
     
    The comedy in all of this, is that the theses in both the Tim McKeough and Garth Clark articles are the promotion of ceramics. It gets muddy because McKeough is heavy handed and has no familiarity with the industry to which he's throwing the proverbial bone. In return, Clark is ego-driven and tries to throw down with the vigor of a pubescent boy on the playground. The crucial mistake here is that the divide should not be drawn between establishment and new-comer, but on the basis of quality of work.
     
    I'll add that Garth Clark isn't wrong, he just gives up too much ground through the cheap shots he took at McKeough and the NY Times. And it is a critical error to appear guilty of such when defaming romantic writing.
  4. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from GEP in Why Handmade Ceramics Are White Hot (Nytimes)   
    Yes. He is arguing that the NY Times as an entity, wholly ignores American studio ceramics. When McKeough locks onto these "romantic" tales of the white collar businessman finding ceramics, it sells the story, not necessarily good work. In the Fashion and Style section, one can see Clark has an expectation of critical design writing, not inspirational story-telling. His anger is well-placed in this sense.
     
    What I do find objectionable is the exclusionary attitude of American studio ceramics. You can read this into Clark's writing, but this attitude underpins most avenues of dissemination for contemporary American studio ceramics (e.g. buddy-buddy deals, mis-guided gallery curation, and the incestuous nature of certain pedigrees). This is too much to discuss on this board, but is fair to acknowledge as a counterpoint to Clark's stance. It is also fair to note Garth Clark's personal stake in defending his position as an expert on American Ceramics verses "amateur hour" (Tim McKeough).
     
     
    The comparison that Clark draws is a direct result of his frustration with the lack of promotion for his favorite brand of American studio ceramics (and perhaps design editors encroaching on his area of expertise). But, the NY Times made its choice, and Clark's comparison is necessary to expression of his frustration. Your suggestion that Alleghany Meadows and Forrest Lewinger exist on different planes is probably true. They likely don't have to compete at all for their sales audience. However, they do have to compete for the NY Times endorsement. Which is one hell of a sales engine. It's a responsibility too. The question becomes whether the NY Times Style and Fashion section should be selling the best of contemporary American ceramics, or romantic "pipe dreams" of the white collar worker. It's easy to read my preference, but that's an editorial decision (subject to the agenda of the editor). Clark might as well argue that the NY Times is a trash newspaper. Which might be true.
     
    Bill Rogers' attempt to diffuse Clark's article, represents incongruence in the direction of Cfile. And at some point, one has to realize that there's not big enough of an audience to publish decent critical discourse on ceramics in America. For now, just enjoy the half-baked opinions of any publication covering American Ceramics. Any energy wasted on this discussion would be far better used in pursuit of making better work.
     
    The comedy in all of this, is that the theses in both the Tim McKeough and Garth Clark articles are the promotion of ceramics. It gets muddy because McKeough is heavy handed and has no familiarity with the industry to which he's throwing the proverbial bone. In return, Clark is ego-driven and tries to throw down with the vigor of a pubescent boy on the playground. The crucial mistake here is that the divide should not be drawn between establishment and new-comer, but on the basis of quality of work.
     
    I'll add that Garth Clark isn't wrong, he just gives up too much ground through the cheap shots he took at McKeough and the NY Times. And it is a critical error to appear guilty of such when defaming romantic writing.
  5. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Why Handmade Ceramics Are White Hot (Nytimes)   
    Also, for reference, a 50% increase in graduate students majoring in Ceramics is an increase of about 2 students for RISD. This had better be an unintended error.
  6. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Tyler Miller in Why Handmade Ceramics Are White Hot (Nytimes)   
    Yes. He is arguing that the NY Times as an entity, wholly ignores American studio ceramics. When McKeough locks onto these "romantic" tales of the white collar businessman finding ceramics, it sells the story, not necessarily good work. In the Fashion and Style section, one can see Clark has an expectation of critical design writing, not inspirational story-telling. His anger is well-placed in this sense.
     
    What I do find objectionable is the exclusionary attitude of American studio ceramics. You can read this into Clark's writing, but this attitude underpins most avenues of dissemination for contemporary American studio ceramics (e.g. buddy-buddy deals, mis-guided gallery curation, and the incestuous nature of certain pedigrees). This is too much to discuss on this board, but is fair to acknowledge as a counterpoint to Clark's stance. It is also fair to note Garth Clark's personal stake in defending his position as an expert on American Ceramics verses "amateur hour" (Tim McKeough).
     
     
    The comparison that Clark draws is a direct result of his frustration with the lack of promotion for his favorite brand of American studio ceramics (and perhaps design editors encroaching on his area of expertise). But, the NY Times made its choice, and Clark's comparison is necessary to expression of his frustration. Your suggestion that Alleghany Meadows and Forrest Lewinger exist on different planes is probably true. They likely don't have to compete at all for their sales audience. However, they do have to compete for the NY Times endorsement. Which is one hell of a sales engine. It's a responsibility too. The question becomes whether the NY Times Style and Fashion section should be selling the best of contemporary American ceramics, or romantic "pipe dreams" of the white collar worker. It's easy to read my preference, but that's an editorial decision (subject to the agenda of the editor). Clark might as well argue that the NY Times is a trash newspaper. Which might be true.
     
    Bill Rogers' attempt to diffuse Clark's article, represents incongruence in the direction of Cfile. And at some point, one has to realize that there's not big enough of an audience to publish decent critical discourse on ceramics in America. For now, just enjoy the half-baked opinions of any publication covering American Ceramics. Any energy wasted on this discussion would be far better used in pursuit of making better work.
     
    The comedy in all of this, is that the theses in both the Tim McKeough and Garth Clark articles are the promotion of ceramics. It gets muddy because McKeough is heavy handed and has no familiarity with the industry to which he's throwing the proverbial bone. In return, Clark is ego-driven and tries to throw down with the vigor of a pubescent boy on the playground. The crucial mistake here is that the divide should not be drawn between establishment and new-comer, but on the basis of quality of work.
     
    I'll add that Garth Clark isn't wrong, he just gives up too much ground through the cheap shots he took at McKeough and the NY Times. And it is a critical error to appear guilty of such when defaming romantic writing.
  7. Like
    Colby Charpentier reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Old Brittle Ifb   
    Do you have access to a Soldner mixer? I've heard of some colleges making their own ceramic grog in one out of scrap bisque.
  8. Like
    Colby Charpentier reacted to Tyler Miller in How Do You Do Custom Orders?   
    I think part of the success to doing custom orders is to set very specific expectations from the beginning.  I've got a very particular potter in mind who seems to do a lot of custom work and succeeds pretty nicely at it.  She's got a very individualistic style that's never absent from her work.  Fixed colour and pot shape options with no deviations, extremely consistent aesthetic.  You can have any colour you like, as long as it's already on a piece she's made.  "Custom" means you can pick your pot shape and pick what she paints on your pot.  Another potter who occasionally posts here does something similar--fixed line of pots with customization options.  I think this is maybe why custom orders are tougher for some potters/ceramists than others.  Most of us aren't so dedicated to a single "line" of pots.
     
    And let's be honest, the informed consumer is a minority at best.  This isn't a bad thing, just reality.  I'm way out of my comfort zone once I leave the "making things" part of a store.  When a potential buyer asks for a custom order, they like your stuff, but they're likely not familiar with what you can and cannot do.  So they don't really know what they want.  Giving the buyer choices, rather than asking what they want is better.
     
    There was this awesome, but terrible burger place that lasted all of 30 seconds here.  It was awesome because you could have ANYTHING you wanted on your burger, it was terrible because there was no logic to their selections.  I went up once and ordered a burger, got to the topping station, and I froze.  50 toppings in no particular order, just 50 little topping tubs.  I got confused and put like 5 tomato toppings on it.  Somehow spicy ketchup and bruschetta mix ended up on the same burger.  It wasn't some late-night post bar snack where a compromised mental state could have excused my choices, either.  Even though I was picking, and I was the one in charge,  I had no idea what I wanted and all I got was disappointment.
     
    For the most part, custom orders are an invitation to trouble, but I think that if you find yourself in a situation where you can give your buyers a clear set of expectations, it can work for some people.
  9. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from prattcm in Plaster Mold From Eps Foam   
    2-3 coats of shellac and a light application of universal mold release should serve you well. Remember to brush the UMR into the detail after spraying for proper application.
  10. Like
    Colby Charpentier reacted to bciskepottery in The Great Pottery Throw Down   
    http://musingaboutmud.blogspot.ca/2015/11/movie-day-great-pottery-throw-down.html
  11. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Lichen Glaze "peels" Off When Applied   
    The moisture in the first layer of glaze/slip and the body is key here. You either apply the next coat while the under layers have enough moisture that the two dry together, or you wait for the first to dry, so the rehydration of the under layers doesn't push it off of the body (notice how clay rehydrates well when wet or dry, but is resistant to moisture in the leather hard stages, similar interaction).
     
    The biggest adjustment to make with these crawl glazes is the amount of mag carb. That's the material with the super high CoE doing all the crawling work. Changing the amount can change the amount and size of crawling, and by reducing the amount of fluxes, also changes the melt of the crawl (You can get crawls that look sharp like peeling layers of slip, versus melted blobs of glaze). But, as suggested, try application of the top layer fairly soon after the base, and also try it after allowing the base to dry to see how it responds.
  12. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Rae Reich in I Love This Forum! Throwing Clay Question (Noob)   
    It's also worth mentioning the thixotropy of clay, especially with high kaolin contents. Get the clay moving prior to putting it on the wheel, or cone it a couple of times before pulling. It makes a huge difference.
     
    Also, you don't need a body that stretches well for that you're making, especially with how much you're trimming. But, if you do start needing a stretching body, I've found great success with white stonewares (porcelain with ballclay:P) in terms of stretching on the wheel. For handbuilding, a plastic stoneware like soldate 60 is tops (for stretching).
  13. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Dick White in Cone Numbers- No Cone 0   
    The cone system is based on a ratio of Silica and Alumina to Fluxes. Cone 1 is 1 mole Silica (0.1 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes (the Alumina rises proportionally to the Silica). Cone 2 is 2 moles Silica (0.2 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes. Cone 3, 3 moles Silica (0.3 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes. The reason Cone 0 does not exist is because Cone 01 represents the transition from whole number proportions of Silica to fractions less than 1. When the system approaches zero, that's actually a situation where the corresponding cone is all fluxes, no silica/alumina.
  14. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Cone Numbers- No Cone 0   
    The cone system is based on a ratio of Silica and Alumina to Fluxes. Cone 1 is 1 mole Silica (0.1 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes (the Alumina rises proportionally to the Silica). Cone 2 is 2 moles Silica (0.2 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes. Cone 3, 3 moles Silica (0.3 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes. The reason Cone 0 does not exist is because Cone 01 represents the transition from whole number proportions of Silica to fractions less than 1. When the system approaches zero, that's actually a situation where the corresponding cone is all fluxes, no silica/alumina.
  15. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from LeeU in Cone Numbers- No Cone 0   
    The cone system is based on a ratio of Silica and Alumina to Fluxes. Cone 1 is 1 mole Silica (0.1 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes (the Alumina rises proportionally to the Silica). Cone 2 is 2 moles Silica (0.2 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes. Cone 3, 3 moles Silica (0.3 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes. The reason Cone 0 does not exist is because Cone 01 represents the transition from whole number proportions of Silica to fractions less than 1. When the system approaches zero, that's actually a situation where the corresponding cone is all fluxes, no silica/alumina.
  16. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from bciskepottery in Cone Numbers- No Cone 0   
    The cone system is based on a ratio of Silica and Alumina to Fluxes. Cone 1 is 1 mole Silica (0.1 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes (the Alumina rises proportionally to the Silica). Cone 2 is 2 moles Silica (0.2 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes. Cone 3, 3 moles Silica (0.3 moles Alumina) to 1 mole of fluxes. The reason Cone 0 does not exist is because Cone 01 represents the transition from whole number proportions of Silica to fractions less than 1. When the system approaches zero, that's actually a situation where the corresponding cone is all fluxes, no silica/alumina.
  17. Like
    Colby Charpentier reacted to Mudslinger Ceramics in How To Avoid Thin Porcelain From Breaking?   
    Hi lala
     
    take a look at the following forum post (my request from few months ago) and look at the recipie for ceramic tape casting from Alfred university......uses PVA glue into porcelain slip to get 1mm thin sheets. A commercial product called Keraflex is made this way but shockingly expensive so some clever, clever people worked out how to make similar
     
     http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/5967-ceramic-tape-recipe-like-keraflex/?hl=%2Bthin+%2Bporcelain
     
    Irene
  18. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Babs in Can I Swap Neph Sy In This Glaze?   
    Keep your recipe the same, spray a very light mist of soda ash at the edge of your glazes.
  19. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Surubee in Sarah Hillman Glazing   
    A likely possibility is casting an outer layer of white clay with a colored layer on the inside. Reading her website, "Each piece is made in pure white clay and is hand cut with sweeping curves to reveal a bold, colourful and vibrant interior." This supports the suggestion of a two color casting, however, her images are low res and it's pretty difficult to confirm. If I had to replicate her forms, I would try this approach first. Feel free to reach out to her through e-mail, facebook, or twitter.
  20. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Pres in Sarah Hillman Glazing   
    A likely possibility is casting an outer layer of white clay with a colored layer on the inside. Reading her website, "Each piece is made in pure white clay and is hand cut with sweeping curves to reveal a bold, colourful and vibrant interior." This supports the suggestion of a two color casting, however, her images are low res and it's pretty difficult to confirm. If I had to replicate her forms, I would try this approach first. Feel free to reach out to her through e-mail, facebook, or twitter.
  21. Like
    Colby Charpentier reacted to GrowlerGuy in making stoneware clay bottles for beer   
    Howdy Folks, 
    Paul Chenoweth asked me to come onto the post to help answer some questions and after reading some of the posts regarding growlers I would be happy to answer questions.
     
    To introduce myself, I have been making primarily nothing but growlers for over 6 years - both turned and cast. One offs and mass production. I have worked with huge breweries around the country (Widmer, Kona, etc) and have sent my growlers all over the world. You can see some of my stuff at
     
    www.handmadegrowlers.com  
     
    When I first began making growlers there was A HUGE learning curve to get the shrinkage, top fitment and function just right.
     
    As I read through the previous posts,  a couple of things that jumped out at me are the following:
     
    1. Growlers are not meant for bottle conditioning home-brews. Don't even attempt it as you cannot control the living portion of the process (sugars and yeast) you will end up with a huge mess!
     
    2. Flip Tops DO NOT RELEASE CARBONATION, they are made in such a way as not to budge - unlike the screw on tops for the glass growlers. Those are actually made to release pressure and give much like when you pop open a jelly jar for the first time. 
     
    3. Carbonation-CO2 is not your friend. As CO2 comes out of solution (as beer warms) carbonation will build up inside your vessel. If you do not have a strong enough clay body, or the type of top that releases pressure, something has to give.  I spent a lot of time with my local head brewer going over their carbonation/ temp charts, and did a lot of pressure testing on my growlers. I built a pressure tester and have blown up more growlers than you would ever imagine - recording the PSI, body wall thickness, temps, etc etc.. I would recommend doing the same type of testing before offering them for sale. I learned the hard way that people hate it when beer explodes all over the inside of their car!
     
    4. Flip tops.  The small Grolsch style tops are too small for growlers and most filling stations or brewery hoses won't fit. The 34 mm size is the style I prefer. The wide mouth ones work really great too. Both styles are hard to source but if you are looking for them in bulk, I would try Saxco Pacific. If you want just a handful, call the guys Sound Homebrew (or go to them online) - i get orders from them within 3 days usually. 
     
    5. The flip top bales I use can be slightly "adjusted". pull the two pieces apart and the bracket that holds the topper, those arms can be straightened and re -bent higher or lower depending on if you need a little more room or a little less to make it a tight seal.  If you can close the bail and still rock the stopper back and forth, it is too loose - tighten it up a bit. 
     
    6. Growlers are a temporary storage device, meant to get beer home, or to a party and then used. I have however kept beer good, in my growlers for almost two weeks - IN the refrigerator - keeping that beer nice and cold and the carbonation down. I have at times popped the top to releases a little of the pressure just to be sure. 
     
    7. Growlers are a blast to make and more fun to take to the local brewery - learn your states regulations (and those of any states where you might have customers) some places require by law the legalese Gov Warning label. Some states have totally crazy laws -others are way more lax.  It sucks bringing one and finding out you can't fill it.
     
    8. Brewers make money by the ounce. You gotta have your shrinkage rate dialed in and the sizing just so. 
     
    Hope that helps. If anyone has specific questions, please feel free to email me at carlburgpottery@gmail.com
     
    Best of luck and happy turning!
  22. Like
    Colby Charpentier reacted to Angie Days in making stoneware clay bottles for beer   
    Thank you Mark.
    I change my profile photo... That's the thing.
    The Instructable is a fast version so please be kind.
    Here it is the link:http://www.instructables.com/id/Flip-Top-Bottle-Cap-Make-a-durable-and-strong-bott/
  23. Like
    Colby Charpentier reacted to Tyler Miller in Why Do The Fluxing Molecules Only Have One Oxygen Atom   
    It has to do with the kind of bonds the fluxes, glassformers, etc. form.  Look at a periodic table, on the one side you've got the alkali metals, alkaline earths, etc.  On the other, you've got the halogens, chalcogens, etc.  Sodium chloride is a prime example of an ionic bond--the metal is the cation, the anion a halogen.  You can dissociated the sodium ion from the chlorine ion by introducing something like water which has a polarity to it (a positive and a negative side).
     
    On the other side of things, you have covalent bonds, which are considerably stronger and much harder to break.  Silicon dioxide is a covalent bond that forms giant covalent structures.
     
    It's important to note that most bonds are a hybrid and covalent and ionic bonds form a spectrum rather than hard and fast differentiation. Polar bonds are exactly in the middle (like water).
     
    So, the fluxes have one oxygen atom because of the charge they have.  Sodium, potassium (and all the alkali metals) ions have a charge of +1, Calcium ions (and all the alkaline earth ions), +2.  Oxygen has a -2 charge. Therefore, all the common fluxes, which have weaker ionic bonds, must, by virtue of their charge, have only one oxygen atom.
     
    Borates, of course, are the wild card.  Actually, there are a lot of wild cards, but they function on similar principles, just in more complicated ways. 
     
    Make sense?
  24. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from Natas Setiabudhi in Ceramic Fiber Body   
    Paper clay will not have a noticeable difference in translucency when formed from an opaque body.
  25. Like
    Colby Charpentier got a reaction from docweathers in Keeping Casserole Lids From Sticking During Glaze Firing   
    I do an alumina paste of alumina and a slight bit of water. I don't have an issue with glaze runs though, so in your case, you'd probably want a kiln wash (like you asked about) as opposed to an alumina wax or paste. The additional clay in the wash will provide a decent barrier if thick enough, but grinding will definitely be required. Also note that with kiln wash, the removal (sanding/grinding) will be a bit more difficult than with alumina alone. It's best to test out both options and decide which you find most viable.
     
    Another quick note, the advantage of the paste over the wax is that you can control application thickness in a greater range with the paste as opposed to the wax. The advantage of the wax over the paste is conserving the moderately expensive alumina and only using a small coating (better where glaze won't be an issue).
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