Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
HAUKSBEE

Raku Glaze Recipes With Photos?

Recommended Posts

HAUKSBEE    0

I'd like to find a good book on Raku glazes that is well illustrated so I don't have to mix so many test batches. Something on the order of John Britt's book on high-temp glazes. (tho' that would be something of a tall order.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HAUKSBEE    0

Thanks. I'll take a flyer on it.

 

As you say, their 'previews' are amazingly unhelpful. Who would think that Copyright pages, Tables of Content, and random Index pages might help a person evaluate a book on, say, butterflies, or ceramics?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
janwallace    0

I'd like to find a good book on Raku glazes that is well illustrated so I don't have to mix so many test batches. Something on the order of John Britt's book on high-temp glazes. (tho' that would be something of a tall order.)

 

Speaking of books about raku... I have a very cool, old book by Robert Piepenburg called 'Raku Pottery' published in 1976. I had to gasp looking through when he recommends using asbestos sheets for kiln shelf protectors in a raku kiln, cut to size with a saw.... OMG. Great book other than that.

 

Here are some raku glaze recipes and others i found with pics. You can download a pdf file once logged in.

Go to this link for the Ceramic Arts Daily. http://ceramicartsdaily.org/category/ceramic-glaze-recipes/raku-glaze-recipes/

 

I have used these recipes below to achieve the reliable results everytime.

 

Fat White Crackle

 

Frit 4194 88

Ball Clay 12

 

 

Turquoise/Copper Red (in reduction)

 

Firt 4194 88

Ball Clay 12

Copper Carb 2

Cobalt Carb 0.2

 

I can email you some pics if you like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HAUKSBEE    0

Thank you for the recipes, and the offer of pictures. They are both very welcome. My e-mail address is kelley02790@charter.net My website is at http://www.robertgkelley.com; click on the 2D side of the site.

 

I also got Pippenburg's raku book. Unlike yourself, I was bitterly disappointed. He had very few illustrations of traditional raku though he discussed it at some length. Virtually all illustrations were of ghastly modern non-functional sculptures. The text was aimed at an audience that was coming to clay for the first time, and the glaze recipies he recommended were not (or I think not) used in the photos. There were no glaze tiles. I spent fifteen minutes ripping out all pages that had pictures on both sides, plus the entire gallery section. Then I felt better.

 

The one delightful epiphany I got was of tiny wood-fired kilns on the beach. Somehow I always had this assumption that wood kilns had to be huge, hill-climbing anagamas. It had to be neck-or-nothing. I have a big yard, and a wood kiln is now within the realm of possibility.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marcia Selsor    1,301

I looked at the Ceramics Arts Daily pictures and saw my horse slabs there. The glaze given, Red Bronze is not the glaze on the large surface of the slab. Red Bronze was used for the line around the horses. Dry Alligator is the colorful glaze on the slabs. Here are the recipes from the article. I have mixed the Dry Alligator by volume rather than weight.

 

So I know that the recipe is not for the photo shown

Red/Bronze Raku Glaze

 

Colemanite . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 .0%

 

Ferro Frit 3134 . . . . . . . . . . 50 .0

 

100 .0 % Add:

 

Tin Oxide . . . . . . . . . . 5 .1 %

 

Copper Carbonate . . . 5 .6 %

 

 

 

 

Dry Alligator Raku Glaze

 

BoneAsh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20grams

 

Colemanite . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

 

Nepheline Syenite . . . . . . . . 10

 

Copper Carbonate . . . . . . . 10

 

80 grams

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
janwallace    0

I looked at the Ceramics Arts Daily pictures and saw my horse slabs there. The glaze given, Red Bronze is not the glaze on the parge surface of the slab. Red Bronze was used for the line around the horses. Dry Alligator is the colorful glaze on the slabs. Here are the recipes from the article. I have mixed the Dry Alligator by volume rather than weight.

 

So I know that the recipe is not for the photo shown

Red/Bronze Raku Glaze

 

Colemanite . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 .0%

 

Ferro Frit 3134 . . . . . . . . . . 50 .0

 

100 .0 % Add:

 

Tin Oxide . . . . . . . . . . 5 .1 %

 

Copper Carbonate . . . 5 .6 %

 

 

 

 

Dry Alligator Raku Glaze

 

BoneAsh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20grams

 

Colemanite . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

 

Nepheline Syenite . . . . . . . . 10

 

Copper Carbonate . . . . . . . 10

 

80 grams

 

 

 

Thanks Marcia!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
janwallace    0

Thank you for the recipes, and the offer of pictures. They are both very welcome. My e-mail address is kelley02790@charter.net My website is at http://www.robertgkelley.com; click on the 2D side of the site.

 

I also got Pippenburg's raku book. Unlike yourself, I was bitterly disappointed. He had very few illustrations of traditional raku though he discussed it at some length. Virtually all illustrations were of ghastly modern non-functional sculptures. The text was aimed at an audience that was coming to clay for the first time, and the glaze recipies he recommended were not (or I think not) used in the photos. There were no glaze tiles. I spent fifteen minutes ripping out all pages that had pictures on both sides, plus the entire gallery section. Then I felt better.

 

The one delightful epiphany I got was of tiny wood-fired kilns on the beach. Somehow I always had this assumption that wood kilns had to be huge, hill-climbing anagamas. It had to be neck-or-nothing. I have a big yard, and a wood kiln is now within the realm of possibility.

 

 

Yes, i have to agree with you about the Piepenburg book. I found this book some years ago in a second hand book shop when i was starting out with pottery and looking for anything relating to raku. Prior to the internet, i was happy to find such a book. Now we have access to so much information.

 

Photos of the glazes are attached.

 

Oh, i really enjoyed your website. rolleyes.gifpost-2539-12834131573181_thumb.jpg

post-2539-12834131573181_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HAUKSBEE    0

Yes, I imagine the Pippenburg book would look different with pre-internet eyes. Thanks for the pics; the turquoise/red is a real knock-out. Glad you liked the website. Those ceramics were done in the late 80's at Fort Mason Community College in San Francisco.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×