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Water to glaze ratio/mix? (Cherry blossom shino)


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#1 Biglou13

Biglou13

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 05:49 PM

Warning: newB questions
I made a small batch of glaze from raw/dry ingredients. (First time)
I used Approx 22 fluid oz water for 1kilo dry glaze
If my conversions is correct 650.6 ml/ gm of water to 1000gm glaze
This tested out well, info was from Laguna clay for their dry mix glazes (8 to 11 oz per pound)

I want to make larger quantity.

Glaze mixer suggests 1:1 ratio or equal parts not 1: 0.65

As always testing is king and constiency of glaze is adjustable, eg add water gradually.....

Why the big difference?

What is the text book ratio?

As volume increases do ratios stay the same?

Aftersome testing .Here is my (secret) recipe I adjusted a ratios from cherry shino from CAD , "33 tried and true glazes", which originally was a John britt recipe. Original is 10 40 40 10

10 soda ash
37.5. Neph Sy
37.5 spodumene
15 EPK

More questions:
Why is this called cherry blossom shino when there is no color added? Beautiful nonetheless.
What is rule/s that define a real shino?
Is it appropriate decorum to site source, if altered?
This glaze settles /floculates (sp) easily, Epsom salts to deflocculate? How much? Is a well mixed glaze as good as one that is chemically deflocculated?

Attached is image of new formulation, primarily for less gloss, more pinholes.

Thanks in advance.

Attached Files


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#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 09:37 PM

It looks like it may be applied too thickly to the pot. How are you firing it? What type of kiln?
I just mix the water in until it is thicker than milk but thinner than cream. I use a dry finger to do a knuckle test. If you can see the lines in your knuckle after sticking a DRY finger into the mix, then that is it.
Marcia

#3 Biglou13

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 10:29 PM

It looks like it may be applied too thickly to the pot. How are you firing it? What type of kiln?
I just mix the water in until it is thicker than milk but thinner than cream. I use a dry finger to do a knuckle test. If you can see the lines in your knuckle after sticking a DRY finger into the mix, then that is it.
Marcia


its cone 6 electric, oxidation. yes its a very thick application. i have tests of varying degrees of application from thin to thick(as pictured) each with varying characteristics. all of which i like.
in a western sense is glaze to thick a fault?
im making more glaze, than the original 1 kilo, in order to get a more consistent dip/application test,eg 1 sec 2 sec 3..........

thanks for your reply, i was over complicating the mixing. i like the K.I.S.S technique.
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
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