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Duncan EA 820


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#1 takeyasofree

takeyasofree

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 04:05 AM

Hello Everyone,

I am new to pottery. It will be one year in January. YAY!! I am converting my garage (which is for everything but a vehicle) into my studio. Going to the community art studio once or twice a week for 3-4 hours is just not enough anymore. Posted Image

I finally found a kiln on craigslist that is in good condition, heats up, and does not seem to need any repairs. It was $250 with the original manual, some furniture, slip, glazes, stencils and some ceramic magazines. The woman I purchased from was so kind and cautious selling to someone who has never fired before - I don't blame her. I ordered a rolling stand and a furniture kit from Paragon. So total maybe around $500. Still on the prowl for wheel and slab roller Posted Image that won't break the bank.

I did enough research to find that $250 was not bad for a kiln that worked and looks like this one does. I figured even if it stopped working and I could not afford to replace all of the elements I could use it as a raku or saggar kiln.

So ... now I am a little nervous about firing and the electrician has not even given me the estimate for installing an outlet yet (later today hopefully). I am having a hard time getting functional information about this kiln and am not sure what it is capable of helping me accomplish in my art. It ranges from 600C/1112F to 1260C/2300F which confuses me. I get the impression that this is like an all purpose kiln for glass, bisque and glaze. Is this why it is called a teacher kiln? If I have done my research correctly it is cone 022 to cone 8. I have cone 6 clay from class but am not comfortable pushing the kiln to the upper end of firing. I may have to buy lower firing clay and use it for non-functional pieces. (I was hoping not to need to buy another kiln for funtionalware any time soon - or at least until I made some money from my pottery.)

I noticed that the top and bottom of this kiln are made from from the kind of material they use on the space shuttle. How safe is this? If I want to replace with firebrick what is the most cost effective way to accomplish and be safe firing? Has anyone had any experience with this kiln? What kind of things should I look out for that are specific to Duncan kilns (or this particular model)? I am not sure why Duncan went out of the kiln making business so I am wondering a little more if I should have waited a few more months and purchased a Skutt.

Thank you so much for any opinions, help or suggestions.
Takeya

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Attached File  IMG_1603.JPG   851.52KB   20 downloads


#2 Christine

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 04:33 AM

Hello Everyone,

I am new to pottery. It will be one year in January. YAY!! I am converting my garage (which is for everything but a vehicle) into my studio. Going to the community art studio once or twice a week for 3-4 hours is just not enough anymore. Posted Image

I finally found a kiln on craigslist that is in good condition, heats up, and does not seem to need any repairs. It was $250 with the original manual, some furniture, slip, glazes, stencils and some ceramic magazines. The woman I purchased from was so kind and cautious selling to someone who has never fired before - I don't blame her. I ordered a rolling stand and a furniture kit from Paragon. So total maybe around $500. Still on the prowl for wheel and slab roller Posted Image that won't break the bank.

I did enough research to find that $250 was not bad for a kiln that worked and looks like this one does. I figured even if it stopped working and I could not afford to replace all of the elements I could use it as a raku or saggar kiln.

So ... now I am a little nervous about firing and the electrician has not even given me the estimate for installing an outlet yet (later today hopefully). I am having a hard time getting functional information about this kiln and am not sure what it is capable of helping me accomplish in my art. It ranges from 600C/1112F to 1260C/2300F which confuses me. I get the impression that this is like an all purpose kiln for glass, bisque and glaze. Is this why it is called a teacher kiln? If I have done my research correctly it is cone 022 to cone 8. I have cone 6 clay from class but am not comfortable pushing the kiln to the upper end of firing. I may have to buy lower firing clay and use it for non-functional pieces. (I was hoping not to need to buy another kiln for funtionalware any time soon - or at least until I made some money from my pottery.)

I noticed that the top and bottom of this kiln are made from from the kind of material they use on the space shuttle. How safe is this? If I want to replace with firebrick what is the most cost effective way to accomplish and be safe firing? Has anyone had any experience with this kiln? What kind of things should I look out for that are specific to Duncan kilns (or this particular model)? I am not sure why Duncan went out of the kiln making business so I am wondering a little more if I should have waited a few more months and purchased a Skutt.

Thank you so much for any opinions, help or suggestions.
Takeya

Attached File  IMG_1602.JPG   819.04KB   33 downloads

Attached File  IMG_1601.JPG   732.13KB   33 downloads

Attached File  IMG_1603.JPG   851.52KB   20 downloads


Try this: http://www.paragonwe...ion_Manuals.cfm and scroll down - there's a section on Duncan kilns (pdf manuals) which might help. I don't think it would be too successful as a glass kiln though .... they really need elements in the lid.

Hope this helps

Christine




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