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How long do you envision yourself making pots?


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#21 LilyT

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 01:37 AM

I'm a hobby potter, too, but I cannot see myself ever stopping unless physically
disabled or prevented from doing so. When I do and not doing pottery, I am
thinking about it pretty much several times a day every day.

I hope that we all can continue until the very end. Carry on, friends!

-Lily

#22 DPancioli

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 10:03 AM


How long do you think you will be making pots?

I am asking myself this question lately because I am
nearing retirement age. Also, I read lately that Robin Hopper
is no longer making pots; do you know anyone else who
made the decision to stop potting?



Dear All,

I visited Robin at his shop at Christmas. While he may not be actively potting, he is doing some great tiles with a new technique. It is still very much ceramic based.

On this trip, I also visited Walter Dexter. He too is still potting in his 80's. Great work too. He has gone from what I would call functional pieces to sculpture. Beautiful work.

In both cases, these artists have adapted to something new. Maybe that is part of the secret of staying in it. Finding a new niche that works for you.

I hope, like both of these successful artists that I too will be potting. But again, mine is a hobby. It is not a full-time job.

I think what this question leads to is what are the requirements needed to be a potter as we age. Part of it is, without a doubt the sheer physical strength needed to say pick up a box of clay or wedge at length or for those of you who make clay, pugging the stuff. It can be physically exhausting and injurious. But again, my comments are spoken from the position of someone who is a hobby potter not a full-time one.

Nelly


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#23 DPancioli

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 10:06 AM

The replies are tas I thought they would be. And John Baymore hit the nail on the head as usual.
Pottery isn't a job, it is a life, a mission, and an identity. I may retire from teaching but I always imagined
that I would be making pinch pots on my death bed!!
Diana Pancioli
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#24 TJR

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 04:44 PM

I just turned 59 in July. Been making pots for 36 years. No one ever asks me if I'm still making pots. This is who I am and what I do. I might retire from the day job of teaching high school art in two years, but I'll never give up the studio.
A potter buddy of mine switched to water colours and is on me to do some painting, which I am going to try, but my main thing is functional pottery.
TJR.
My only worry is what do I do with the 35 buckets of glaze that I have hanging around the studio. Also all those glaze materials.I am out of Custer Feldspar. Do I buy the bag or just 5 kilos? How long do I have?:unsure:
TJR.

#25 sawing

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 10:38 PM

I'm 46, and just got started. Hopefully I will be at this for many, many years to come!

#26 Mark McCombs

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 11:40 PM

Similar to others here. Just started my pottery at age 50 and wanting to work at it part time until age 60.

Then perhaps make a go at being a full time potter until I am dribbling at the window. :blink:
Mark
Fast Hawk Pottery


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#27 bciskepottery

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 06:36 PM

The video talk in this blog post from the potter Ben Carter may help explain why so many of us make pottery and/or plan to not stop making pottery. Very insightful . . . especially the part about a person not being able to create anything without ten years technical training . . . to change something in a way so it is better than before. A good 20 minute investment.

http://carterpottery...ntmihalyis.html




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