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Diy Slip Mixer / Reclaimer


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#1 jupdyke

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 11:39 PM

Hello all,

I have this idea about making a slip mixer / reclaimer. Slip works best when it is made just right, but I find that mine is hard to keep this way. It dries out as I use it and small chunks keep getting in it. Also, I hate trying to mix it up before I use it with a drill and jiffy mixer. So after a little research I saw the Lehman 30b reclaimer.

Here is a link:
Model 30B

And another link to the assembly instructions
instructions

The price tag of $675 is a little high for me and after a little reading I think I can build one for less then $200. A few things sparked my interest and make me think this is actually very easy. The first is that it uses a standard 1/2 hp motor and these easy to find. The second is that the tank is a standard 30 gallon drum. These are also very common. So my plan is to get my hands on one of these drums and reinforce the top and mount the motor in the center. Then I will use a shaft coupler to attach a 24" stainless steel shaft with the propeller on it. Finally I will add a fitting and faucet to the bottom of the tank.

I have found all the parts and listed them on my website.
Slip Mixing Tank

I am curious to hear all your thoughts.

josh

#2 soursop

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 01:48 PM

I think being inventive in the studio to solve our problems is one of the best ways to progress. Sounds like you're on to something, and if it helps you with your problem then great. I think often times our biggest mistake is to become too comfortable with the way things are or work and we stop trying to improve upon them.

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 02:12 PM

I think being inventive in the studio to solve our problems is one of the best ways to progress. Sounds like you're on to something, and if it helps you with your problem then great. I think often times our biggest mistake is to become too comfortable with the way things are or work and we stop trying to improve upon them.

This post precedes the intended post but I had trouble adding the photo. So here is the mixer assembled. The next post has the mixer apart.
Marcia

#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 02:22 PM


I think being inventive in the studio to solve our problems is one of the best ways to progress. Sounds like you're on to something, and if it helps you with your problem then great. I think often times our biggest mistake is to become too comfortable with the way things are or work and we stop trying to improve upon them.


This is mine. It is about 30 or more years old. It is a motor mounted in square tubing that inserts into larger square tubing on a stand. I use it for processing locally dug raw clay, for recycling scraps, and for beating paper into pulp for paper clay and for mixing paper clay slip. The shaft has two sets of propeller blades at the end and 4" up the shaft. It fits into a 5 gallon bucket. The lid has a slit and hole to accommodate the shaft. Otherwise slip flies everywhere. The bucket sits on a little platform with the larger square tubing attached to the stand.

Marcia

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