Jump to content

maorili

Members
  • Content count

    14
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About maorili

  • Rank
    Newbie

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://maoridesign.jimdo.com/

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Germany
  • Interests
    handbuilding sculptures, dragons, birds, funny animals, torsi, teaching ceramics at school, simple techniques to teach to beginners, woodfiring, redox glazes an many more.
  1. ******************* Another time, guidance had my class, and that taught by the other teacher, in the same room, at the same time. She thought I had started teaching the class in the new room I moved into. The room was good for drawing and such, but it was a Ceramics class, and Ceramics had always been taught in the other room, where the kiln was, the wheels, extruder, glaze storage, project storage racks, you know everything I'd need. I told her, that I had never said, that I was teaching that class anywhere else. She said, she couldn't see why I couldn't teach it in the new room. I told her, it was because I'd have no space, and she disagreed. So, it wasn't just that she made an error, but that she was telling me that she knew better, what would work for teaching my class. I was not amused. I'm fairly certain, to this day, the scheduling "error" was not a mistake, and that the shared room conflict was intentional. **************************** Interesting! This is what happened to me, because of a creation of a new school inside the old school. (in Germany, so I don't explain the details). But for more than half a year, "suddenly" three crafts courses had to share two working rooms, and I was forced to take another room, normally a storage room (no windows..no good air circulation...!) because the other ones had to use the woodworking tools available in the normal rooms. Of course, no washing facilities in our room.. so what about clay working without water?? Kiln is in an extra room, working tools in another room.. At the moment, I'm just waiting for this rest of schoolyear to end, for the situation now (I joined in one of the other working rooms with my clay class) is unbearable.. loud, noisy, crowded... To avoid this I go outside with my students, last thursday doing barrel firing in my yard (while a thunderstorm was passing by *smile*), next thursday go to icecream shop to test our new icecream cups. Infact, it is only an afternoon art class, but under these circumstances, how can you teach anything? ***************************** Well, the still life wasn't their cup of tea, so they rushed through it. Later on, when we do projects, where we select the subject matter, they had ideas, but the shading suffered, ************************* I know about these problems with trying to teach new methods to pupils, but they are not interested in the project, so they miss the new technique and can't use it for the next project, where it is necessary. Because clay work is mostly about "producing" something, some of them tell me they have "enough stuff at home", they don't want to create new things. But they are not willing to do the "production" for school exhibition or wall decoration either.. so it is only an excuse for not doing anything. Blame the system, the teacher or the children? I don't know, but I stop doing these courses this summer. It'll be my hobby again, maybe working sometimes with interested adults or selling some pieces on ebay, etsy, dawanda etc.
  2. If your ceramic will stay in the house for decoration only, you don't have to put a seal on it. Just be careful to take colours that don't fade out in the light. I think you are using ceramics which were fired once to be painted? Or do you want to to the modelling yourself? Normal acrylic colours are okay for once fired ceramic pieces. I don't now about their use on stiffened paperclay or only air dryed clay. It's fun doing it, for "what you see is what you get". It is like a 3D screen for you.
  3. Thank you, Pres, this statement really makes my day! It is much about my attitude in life. :)src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif"> In my opinion, to be a good teacher, you must not only be an artist, but you have to rethink about the methods and skills to be able to explain them in a good and encouraging way. Teaching tools usage can be one part of this. How someone (the learner) than gets the best results may be a very personal way. And I agree, some persons are really no artist and it's difficult do try to teach them. But sometimes I am sooo surprised to reveal artistic skills in a beginner that only had to be discovered and trained. That are the moments that reward you for all the bored ones in a clay course that were send to be there but don't want to. :Dsrc="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.gif">
  4. Slabs for Kids

    Do you have some pictures of how the students created their goblets? Just to get an idea how this project turned out "in reality"?
  5. Slabs for Kids

    I like the idea of the "poison goblet" it might inspire the kids to do some more decoration on it to create "magic" atmosphere. ;)src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/wink.gif"> I'd like to try this one with the children of my schoolgroup. I tried some easy slab projects with children (roll out, stamp, cut, form over plastic foil and a plastic mug) before christmas in 2010 and an upright version: and for Halloween some ghosts (foldes slab for body and arms and attached ghostly head) (my example) seven year old boys: These ghosts were created by my son and a friend. In the school group (11/12 year old to 14/15 year old children) I have mostly the problem of very unmotivated kids because they just want to "chill" instead of being in school in the afternoon. It is a "working group" without marks, but obligatory to attend. :blink:src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/blink.gif"> I'd like to get more ideas for teenagers in the puberty.. :rolleyes:src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/rolleyes.gif">
  6. I think, that you, morah, already do a lot for the childs safety. It sounds like their clay projects are at the moment good protected, with underglaze AND a sort of overglaze. I'm not sure about the clays available to you, but here in Germany some clays are sold that are vitrified at low temperatures, around 1080 °C. (I don't know a lot about these "cones" because my kiln is with electric programming. That might fit with Amaco glazes?? If you have a good glaze, which was at the right temperature in the kiln AND the clay is vitrified, that might add to the quality of childrens work so that you don't have to worry about their saftety at home. You can't influence the hygiene there. Thanks for sharing your ideas to all the others, very informative! greetings Gabi
  7. hello again, maybe my answer of yesterday was on a very simple level, but where did it vanish? :huh:src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/huh.gif"> I can't see it anymore in the forum. :blink:src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/blink.gif"> I agree with all the technical infos about body and glaze and thoughts about bacteria etc. Is this information for teachers in USA downloadable somewhere? Maybe interesting for me here in Germany. I post it again, maybe it is something that might help on a practical side to handle childrens work. Topic: Leaching in kid's projects (maorili -- Today, 05:03 AM) http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/index.php?showtopic=3655 ............................................ Hello morah, I found an interesting solution for this "glazing" problem online, but I don't remember the website. A teacher who works regularly with children first glazes the whole project (not the bottom, of course) with a white glaze, then the kids start painting on it. So if they don't get glaze at any point, it is no problem, and it looks good (maybe white glaze spots, but no unglazed clay). I'm working in afternoon classes, and I tell the children that only if they use special glazes AND i can burn them high enough, it will be really "foodsafe". Other work should be used maybe for sweets or chips or just decoration. Icecream is so fast vanished, may be no problem too. But cleaning could be. I don't think that a sushi plate will be any problem. Maybe soja sauce will get in glaze cracks, which isn't so nice. So why not telling them to stay on decorative or figurative work first? If you can burn high enough, you could buy some nice other glazes and sometimes offer "dish" designing good luck Gabi =====================================
  8. Hello morah, I found an interesting solution for this "glazing" problem online, but I don't remember the website. A teacher who works regularly with children first glazes the whole project (not the bottom, of course) with a white glaze, then the kids start painting on it. So if they don't get glaze at any point, it is no problem, and it looks good (maybe white glaze spots, but no unglazed clay). I'm working in afternoon classes, and I tell the children that only if they use special glazes AND i can burn them high enough, it will be really "foodsafe". Other work should be used maybe for sweets or chips or just decoration. Icecream is so fast vanished, may be no problem too. But cleaning could be. I don't think that a sushi plate will be any problem. Maybe soja sauce will get in glaze cracks, which isn't so nice. So why not telling them to stay on decorative or figurative work first? If you can burn high enough, you could buy some nice other glazes and sometimes offer "dish" designing good luck Gabi
  9. Hello, nice topic, seems every clay worker likes to assemble strange things in the studio! I've not yet found one item I love for modelling. (Or it's my lack of english language) Ballpens, or "ballpoint pens" which don't write any more, are great if you take the pieces one by one. Usually, in front is a small metal piece you can screw off, I use it for imprinting eyes on small figures of clay. Bigger round end for outside, smaller end inside. The longer part makes nice holes, good for any sign which needs holes to get on a wall, and at least any fish scale or dragon skin can be designed with by holding the end slightly angled. Inside, you'll find a small spiral spring nice for decorating things. The former writing tip is good for carving small lines in clay. So all in one a nice tool for modelling..("where are all the ballpoints from my office desk??")
  10. A very special topic and really helpful! Infact, I have not yet thougt about the "Pottery rules" to hand out or put on the wall, but I will definitily work on it! I work with children in a rather old class-room with no good tables, so we have a lot of newspaper to put on the tables first, so that the clay won't grab any dust, wood, colours on the tables while we work with it. Not the best situation, infact. Cleaning up is not the favourite thing for the children.. of course!;-) The materials are often thrown back to the storage without cleaning or drying.. infact, they don't WANT to do any cleaning if not forced to to. Putting up strong rules and a changing cleaning service (someone WILL be responsible for the mess at the end of a class) may change something. The rule: Don't touch others work ! is very important. Don't tell others they do ugly things! would be another rule! And: TRY OUT before I even think about helping you! (the harder you try, the more I'm willing to help) Another would be: If you don't follow my instructions, it can't work out like it should .. but you might try your own way or we fix it later together. The children in my class are allowed to follow their creativity, but they have to respect some rules /technics doing their work, so that the clay don't blow up in the kiln.
  11. Hello morah, I think your situation is not so very simple, having children from 5-13 years, only 45 minutes a day and around 20 children at once! My great respect to you! I´ve experience with classes of 18 children, who not really wanted to do clay projects but had to attend them because of the schools afternoon schedule. It was really a horrible situation for me, (2010) teaching simple projects nearly prohibited by those children who tend to use clay, paper and water to create throwable little bombs.. ;-) I claimed at the school to change their system to only maximum 10 kids (13-14years) (1,5 hours) and to give the children a possibility to choose the clay work freely. Now the situation is much better and I can really give children a chance to learn something and get projects done. But simple projects are not possible for all children, some tend to destroy their work while doing it (especially boys) and so they have to start again from zero or let it be and do something really simple like a little snake or something else. I keep projects simple so they have the possibility to learn by doing, plate technics, stamping/rollng on structure etc. some mold technics. But if they don't listen and don't follow intructions, hey, it's not me who have to do the work again! Poking in holes in some too thick projects from the bottom or through the eyes is one possibility to help keeping things not blown up in the kiln. It is rather easy to do this "fixing" during the lessons or after the lesson. Explaining it during the lesson helps to give children a chance to learn and avoid mistakes. I stress from the first lesson, that they shouldn't work in air bubbles (e.g. by destroying a project, putting it again in a poorly slapped pack and rolling out again). I give some too massive things back to them after drying without kiln firing (not possible) to get it home if they wanted. At least, my aim is that by trying easy clay concepts, they get things to bring them home. But I have once a week, half a schoolyear as time for this. In a summer camp, of course you have different conditions. Making medaillons to get home is a brilliant idea, I think. snakes are always great for boys. And fishes are really a good thing ,easy to do. Maybe think about acrylic decoration instead of glaze. its fast and children love it (what you see is what you get) . smaller children may do it with water colors. If they are modelled massive and not bigger than 10-12 cm, its a good idea to open the mouth and poke in a nice hole (together with the child, not after the class). It normally won't blow up. Nice snails are also easily done projects, as well as mushrooms done from a ball without "scoring".. This picture is from a birthday party, 10 years old. I did first snails (to coils, one to get the house, the other will be the snails body, just a little "scoring and smoothing" to get them together. Decoration was fun for the kids. ) Poke in one hole from the bottom. then as second project (1,5 hours) they tried plate technics, and other easy things. Here another party with children 12/13 years old.
  12. mica or micah?

    Hi, I used Terre RIF once, and was wandering about " 5 % Mica" in it. http://www.toepferspass.de/index.php/keramikbedarf/Fuchs-Ton-schamottierte-Massen-12/product-Terre-RIF-zimt-umbra@TR3015 This product is for rather low temperatures up to 1050 °C or primitive firing techniques. when you use it for lower temperatures, the mica will show (even after biscque firing) at "920 ° they sparkel " Mica is the glimmer in there. I don't know if you can use the digged out one as a component for your clay, but it is worth a try.. isn't it? Good luck!
  13. I am not an expert for fishes, but I made ceramic deco for my freshwater aquarium (only simple 100l) It is no Problem for now nearly two years. I used a light grey clay and brown slip (which is indicated for dishes too) and red slip. Everything is now darker because of the algues, but looks very nice and natural. I think it adds value to my Aquarium because the bacteriums which are in the filter medium can live also on the surface of the clay, if it is still porous. Maybe I am wrong, but fishes are always healthy. after building fresh clay with new plants (newly arranged and planted) after a month old cat on warm aquarium.. she loves it. Greetings from Germany (and sorry for my bad English) Gabi
  14. 4 more ribs!

    Many thanks for your approach to "any pictures" ;-) I'm totally impressed by claclanas work! wonderful! I'm just a beginner in throwing, I like figurative work. to anyone who want to look: http://maoridesign.jimdo.com/ (sorry, it's only in German). Comments in the guestbook appreciated (German: Gästebuch)
×