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Girts

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  1. Like
    Girts got a reaction from blackthorn in Drying Greenware... For How Long?   
    How long before firing?
     
    Twelve years ago, I went to a pottery for a half hour 'experience' session. You had to pay extra for firing, and I didn't think my pots were worth it. They were not tall, slim, thin, elegant, almost transparent. So I just put them away and left them. I re-discovered them a few months ago when I got my kiln, blew the dust off them and thought exactly the same as you did. Is that too long? But I decided to take a chance - at least they'd be thoroughly dry - and bisqued them. No problem. So I glazed them. And they're great! And, as a bonus, I now see I was so wrong with my initial opinion about their quality.
     
    Girts
  2. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Pres in Correct Camera Lens For Product Photos?   
    That's not quite accurate, about distortion being least at smallest aperture. It will give greatest depth of field which means more of the subject will be in sharp focus - which is not the same as distortion. Photographically, distortion is a changing of the shape. Like a building seems to taper as you look up it. To minimise distortion, you need to be as far away from your subject as is feasible, then use the lens to fill the frame. So using your kit lens at its 55mm setting should give you a good result, whereas the 18mm will give you distortion whatever the aperture. It would be interesting to try it with the telephoto attachment when you have the time. It might give excellent results - if you have the space to be far enough away.
    Girts
  3. Like
    Girts got a reaction from GiselleNo5 in Qotw: Would You Laugh At Me If I Told You That I Am Using A Gg?   
    Ummm... I actually am GG. And I haven't been formally introduced to any of you guys and flatly deny having been used in any way! 😉
     
    Girts (Gailans)
  4. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Rae Reich in Artsy Babble Translation Please   
    I don't think anyone's bashing intellectualism - I'm certainly not. I take a poor view of dumbing down. What we're all bashing, I think, is pseudo intellectualism. We've all heard it from union leaders, football managers, sales people and politicians. Artists should be producing art which should, in my opinion, speak for itself. I have no problem with someone saying that this piece was inspired by nature (most things are, so honesty is good) or by a walk in a foggy day in the city or whatever. That's interesting. But the kind of stuff that goes on at length about existential reality or other long-winded splurges really is a waste of time and an insult to the viewer.
     
    Michelangelo and Rembrandt and da Vinci and co. didn't need to do this. Where did it come from?
     
    Sorry, but I just had to get it out of my system. Maybe there's an artwork to be made inspired by the existential reality of artsy babble? Could that be Challenge no.6 ?
     
    Girts
  5. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Giving Shoppers A Sense Of Scale   
    Pretty good! Definitely a sense of scale, and of lifestyle. My only comment (as a former advertising photographer) is the lighting needs a little attention. You're right to not have the sun on the front of the object as it would be too bright and lose the modelling. But because the sun is so bright, the front of the mugs is in deep shadow. So you need a fill light. The easiest way to do that is to use a piece of white card held or propped up on the side you want lightened. You can see the effect immediately and move it around or angle it to get the modelling and brightness you want. A cheap, very effective, and highly professional solution to the problem.
    Wel done!
     
    Girts
  6. Like
    Girts got a reaction from High Bridge Pottery in Drying Greenware... For How Long?   
    How long before firing?
     
    Twelve years ago, I went to a pottery for a half hour 'experience' session. You had to pay extra for firing, and I didn't think my pots were worth it. They were not tall, slim, thin, elegant, almost transparent. So I just put them away and left them. I re-discovered them a few months ago when I got my kiln, blew the dust off them and thought exactly the same as you did. Is that too long? But I decided to take a chance - at least they'd be thoroughly dry - and bisqued them. No problem. So I glazed them. And they're great! And, as a bonus, I now see I was so wrong with my initial opinion about their quality.
     
    Girts
  7. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Joseph Fireborn in Drying Greenware... For How Long?   
    How long before firing?
     
    Twelve years ago, I went to a pottery for a half hour 'experience' session. You had to pay extra for firing, and I didn't think my pots were worth it. They were not tall, slim, thin, elegant, almost transparent. So I just put them away and left them. I re-discovered them a few months ago when I got my kiln, blew the dust off them and thought exactly the same as you did. Is that too long? But I decided to take a chance - at least they'd be thoroughly dry - and bisqued them. No problem. So I glazed them. And they're great! And, as a bonus, I now see I was so wrong with my initial opinion about their quality.
     
    Girts
  8. Like
    Girts got a reaction from flowerdry in Drying Greenware... For How Long?   
    How long before firing?
     
    Twelve years ago, I went to a pottery for a half hour 'experience' session. You had to pay extra for firing, and I didn't think my pots were worth it. They were not tall, slim, thin, elegant, almost transparent. So I just put them away and left them. I re-discovered them a few months ago when I got my kiln, blew the dust off them and thought exactly the same as you did. Is that too long? But I decided to take a chance - at least they'd be thoroughly dry - and bisqued them. No problem. So I glazed them. And they're great! And, as a bonus, I now see I was so wrong with my initial opinion about their quality.
     
    Girts
  9. Like
    Girts got a reaction from TallTayl in Pricing For Beginner's Piece   
    I agree with you Chris. Pricing by weight has to be a nonsense. Looking at my early pieces, they weigh a ton, but look not that wonderful. My latest pieces look excellent but weigh considerably less than the old ones. So does it make sense to price them by weight? I don't think so. Pricing by comparable work has to be the only realistic way. In effect, what the market will support. So I'd say ask your professor for guidance and look at local shops, online, wherever work like yours is being sold.
     
    Girts
  10. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Etsy Sale Confusion   
    Maybe the best thing would be to point out to her that you had made it clear that the price was per mug, not per set and offer her a refund on receipt of the undamaged mugs, returned at her expense. This would be the normal procedure and it was obviously her mistake if your listing was clear. At the end of the day, she was buying online and needs to read the description carefully. Any doubts, any uncertainty - ask the question!
     
    Somehow, I doubt that you will ever make her happy. Whatever the outcome, there's always the risk of a bad review but if your listing was clear then anyone looking at her comment would say 'silly woman - 8 hand made mugs for $40? Be sensible!'.
     
    And I would not give out my phone number, even though I agree that talking is better than writing for sorting out problems.
     
    Girts
  11. Like
    Girts got a reaction from GiselleNo5 in Etsy Sale Confusion   
    Maybe the best thing would be to point out to her that you had made it clear that the price was per mug, not per set and offer her a refund on receipt of the undamaged mugs, returned at her expense. This would be the normal procedure and it was obviously her mistake if your listing was clear. At the end of the day, she was buying online and needs to read the description carefully. Any doubts, any uncertainty - ask the question!
     
    Somehow, I doubt that you will ever make her happy. Whatever the outcome, there's always the risk of a bad review but if your listing was clear then anyone looking at her comment would say 'silly woman - 8 hand made mugs for $40? Be sensible!'.
     
    And I would not give out my phone number, even though I agree that talking is better than writing for sorting out problems.
     
    Girts
  12. Like
    Girts got a reaction from TallTayl in Etsy Sale Confusion   
    Maybe the best thing would be to point out to her that you had made it clear that the price was per mug, not per set and offer her a refund on receipt of the undamaged mugs, returned at her expense. This would be the normal procedure and it was obviously her mistake if your listing was clear. At the end of the day, she was buying online and needs to read the description carefully. Any doubts, any uncertainty - ask the question!
     
    Somehow, I doubt that you will ever make her happy. Whatever the outcome, there's always the risk of a bad review but if your listing was clear then anyone looking at her comment would say 'silly woman - 8 hand made mugs for $40? Be sensible!'.
     
    And I would not give out my phone number, even though I agree that talking is better than writing for sorting out problems.
     
    Girts
  13. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Chilly in Help For Newbie Red Glaze   
    An excellent analogy. Thanks Chilly. Now the principle behind cones make sense to me.
     
    Girts
  14. Like
    Girts got a reaction from vinks in Qotw: As A Discerning Potter, When And Why Do You Buy Handmade Pottery?   
    Some years ago, I moved into a flat above a shop that sold ceramics. The shop closed down at the same time and the landlord just piled up the stock at the back of the shop. I asked him what he was going to do with it all; he replied that if the potters didn't collect themby the following week-end, he was taking them all to the tip. The week passed, no-one collected anything, so I spoke to the landlord again. He said I was welcome to take anything I liked, no charge, (not like him at all) and the rest was going to the tip in an hour's time. So I got a big box and filled it with all the pieces I liked. In those days, I knew even less about ceramics than I do now, but I still use and look at those pieces with affection. And what else do they have in common? I enjoy them, that's what.
     
    And that's why I buy a piece of pottery. Because I enjoy that piece. Simple. Nowadays, I'm getting close to saying 'I could make that', but I couldn't - no matter how skilled I might become. I could make something similar, but there would always be something different between the piece that artist made and the piece you or I or anyone else here, made.
     
    Apart from this rescue lot, I always pay the asking price - it's his/her living.
     
    Girts
  15. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Chris Campbell in Qotw: As A Discerning Potter, When And Why Do You Buy Handmade Pottery?   
    Some years ago, I moved into a flat above a shop that sold ceramics. The shop closed down at the same time and the landlord just piled up the stock at the back of the shop. I asked him what he was going to do with it all; he replied that if the potters didn't collect themby the following week-end, he was taking them all to the tip. The week passed, no-one collected anything, so I spoke to the landlord again. He said I was welcome to take anything I liked, no charge, (not like him at all) and the rest was going to the tip in an hour's time. So I got a big box and filled it with all the pieces I liked. In those days, I knew even less about ceramics than I do now, but I still use and look at those pieces with affection. And what else do they have in common? I enjoy them, that's what.
     
    And that's why I buy a piece of pottery. Because I enjoy that piece. Simple. Nowadays, I'm getting close to saying 'I could make that', but I couldn't - no matter how skilled I might become. I could make something similar, but there would always be something different between the piece that artist made and the piece you or I or anyone else here, made.
     
    Apart from this rescue lot, I always pay the asking price - it's his/her living.
     
    Girts
  16. Like
    Girts got a reaction from bciskepottery in Qotw: As A Discerning Potter, When And Why Do You Buy Handmade Pottery?   
    Some years ago, I moved into a flat above a shop that sold ceramics. The shop closed down at the same time and the landlord just piled up the stock at the back of the shop. I asked him what he was going to do with it all; he replied that if the potters didn't collect themby the following week-end, he was taking them all to the tip. The week passed, no-one collected anything, so I spoke to the landlord again. He said I was welcome to take anything I liked, no charge, (not like him at all) and the rest was going to the tip in an hour's time. So I got a big box and filled it with all the pieces I liked. In those days, I knew even less about ceramics than I do now, but I still use and look at those pieces with affection. And what else do they have in common? I enjoy them, that's what.
     
    And that's why I buy a piece of pottery. Because I enjoy that piece. Simple. Nowadays, I'm getting close to saying 'I could make that', but I couldn't - no matter how skilled I might become. I could make something similar, but there would always be something different between the piece that artist made and the piece you or I or anyone else here, made.
     
    Apart from this rescue lot, I always pay the asking price - it's his/her living.
     
    Girts
  17. Like
    Girts got a reaction from curt in Solar Powered Kiln?   
    No Alabama, I have to protest.
     
    Please read what I actually said. I said nothing about needing an acre of land, or a sub-station, or spending $43,000! Nowhere near that! So please don't mis-represent me. I simply said what several other people and I are experiencing at present. That we can use solar power effectively. Obviously, there are problems at night, which is why we power-share with the National Grid, selling at some times, buying at others. Even today, when it's been raining most of the time, we have been generating a useful amount of electricity which has been sold to the power company. I haven't fired the kiln today but we're still being paid for what we generate.
     
    Two years ago, when this thread was started, solar was far less efficient than it is today; next year it will be more efficient still. And that was the point I was making. The question was is it possible to use solar power to fire a kiln. The answer is obviously yes: there are enough people posted here who are doing it. There are provisos, as with any form of energy, but it can be done. And it will only get better as the technology improves and other energy sources like oil and gas dwindle and become more expensive.
     
    Girts
  18. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Roberta12 in I Got Asked If I "wholesale" And If I Wanted To Do A "pop Up"   
    Curmugeannes?
  19. Like
    Girts got a reaction from curt in Solar Powered Kiln?   
    Yes Neil, it is a small kiln and it's also a small PV array. But that's missing the point. The point is that running a kiln off solar power is possible. Just in this thread we have someone else in the UK and someone in Australia doing just that to some degree. Earlier posts dismissed the possibility out of hand as totally impossible. I'm just pointing out that it is possible now and kilns will become more efficient as will solar power systems. So it won't be that long before larger kilns can be run that way. The problem is that Elon Musk doesn't find kilns as sexy as cars; if he did it would be happening more quickly ☺
  20. Like
    Girts got a reaction from TLDinNC in Do You Like Crackled Glazes?   
    Stained glass! That's it! It has the same intensity and glow! Well spotted Giselle5. (Whatever happened to Giselle4? Or 3? Or 2? Is there a mass de-giseller on the loose?) Sorry - I digress.
     
    Girts
  21. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Mudslinger Ceramics in Artsy Babble Translation Please   
    I sincerely hope that this was a one-off experience, but...
     
    A few years ago, we went to the Degree Show at an Art College which had best remain nameless. The thing that impressed both of us (my wife and I are both professional photographers) most was the Artist Statements that were beautifully printed alongside each exhibit. They were masterpieces of totally meaningless gibberish whereas the artworks were (in both our opinions) mediocre at best, and certainly not worthy of any degree status. But the Statements were exceptional examples of the Art of Obfuscation, and probably merited a degree in that subject. We concluded that that was what the college in question excelled in, and possibly helped their graduates get their work into certain galleries with substantial price tickets - for all the wrong reasons.
     
    Or maybe I'm just out of touch with reality.
  22. Like
    Girts got a reaction from bciskepottery in Qotw: Are "kiln Gods" Superstition?   
    In my mind, kiln gods come under the heading of superstition. And superstitions are something I don't bother about. The number 13 doesn't bother me and the only time I won't walk under a ladder is when someone is up there with a pot of paint or a heavy hammer. So, if other people feel kiln gods are important and contribute to their success, that's fine by me. After all, there is the argument that one person's religion is another person's superstition and vice versa.
     
    So when I walked into my studio after reading this question, I was surprised to notice something. On the wall, above and to the right of the kiln, is a photograph of a woman's face. She has flame red hair and a cyan face - all very blurred and abstract. She is called "Scarlet Muse" and I put up the picture because I like it, and it felt right in that position; a purely instinctive placing. But her face is angled down as if she's looking at the kiln, overseeing it, watching over it.
     
    Which reminds me of Voltaire. On his death bed, he was asked by the priest to renounce the Devil and all his works. Voltaire refused and, with his dying breath, explained that this was no time to be making new enemies.
     
    Just a thought...
     
    Girts
  23. Like
    Girts got a reaction from terrim8 in Artsy Babble Translation Please   
    I sincerely hope that this was a one-off experience, but...
     
    A few years ago, we went to the Degree Show at an Art College which had best remain nameless. The thing that impressed both of us (my wife and I are both professional photographers) most was the Artist Statements that were beautifully printed alongside each exhibit. They were masterpieces of totally meaningless gibberish whereas the artworks were (in both our opinions) mediocre at best, and certainly not worthy of any degree status. But the Statements were exceptional examples of the Art of Obfuscation, and probably merited a degree in that subject. We concluded that that was what the college in question excelled in, and possibly helped their graduates get their work into certain galleries with substantial price tickets - for all the wrong reasons.
     
    Or maybe I'm just out of touch with reality.
  24. Like
    Girts got a reaction from Babs in Ethical Dilemma-Any Ideas   
    This sounds a bit odd to me. Surely anything other than the full, unopened, originally sealed bag with all the maker's/supplier's marks on it is useless to him. A half cup means you have to scoop some out of the bag. That could contaminate it. You'd put it in another bag or screw top container. Ditto. Then he wants the empty bag, so you have to decant the rest into something else? And then Sam Spade or Jim Rockford (not a licensed handler of hazardous materials) will knock at your door, take the bag, (give you a cheque?), put the stuff in the boot of his car and drive off into the sunset. All of that means the stuff he gets is useless as evidence, surely.
    Just tell him the bag's been opened for quite a while and won't be any use to him as you can't be sure what implements you've used to take stuff out.
     
    I too have no love of that profession - it seems the quickest way to lose lots of money. At least with the horses there's a chance of getting your money back...
  25. Like
    Girts got a reaction from D Walsh in Ethical Dilemma-Any Ideas   
    This sounds a bit odd to me. Surely anything other than the full, unopened, originally sealed bag with all the maker's/supplier's marks on it is useless to him. A half cup means you have to scoop some out of the bag. That could contaminate it. You'd put it in another bag or screw top container. Ditto. Then he wants the empty bag, so you have to decant the rest into something else? And then Sam Spade or Jim Rockford (not a licensed handler of hazardous materials) will knock at your door, take the bag, (give you a cheque?), put the stuff in the boot of his car and drive off into the sunset. All of that means the stuff he gets is useless as evidence, surely.
    Just tell him the bag's been opened for quite a while and won't be any use to him as you can't be sure what implements you've used to take stuff out.
     
    I too have no love of that profession - it seems the quickest way to lose lots of money. At least with the horses there's a chance of getting your money back...
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