Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
eakinclayworks

Egyptian Paste - Throwing Formula?

Recommended Posts

A student of a fellow faculty member at a local arts center was recently introduced to Egyptian Paste for making small beads and other objects. She liked it so well that she wanted to know if the formula could be modified to make the paste suitable for throwing. Does anyone know if this has been done or if there is such a formula?

 

Alice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A student of a fellow faculty member at a local arts center was recently introduced to Egyptian Paste for making small beads and other objects. She liked it so well that she wanted to know if the formula could be modified to make the paste suitable for throwing. Does anyone know if this has been done or if there is such a formula?

 

Alice

 

 

The problem with Egyptian paste is that there is not much clay (so it is low in plasticity- can't throw it) and it has a bunch of oxides in it like cobalt or copper and a lot of soda ash/soda bicarbonate (can be caustic) so you don't want to have your hand in it with out gloves.

 

You could try it with gloves and just add a bunch of ball clay (15% - 25%) or bentonite (5% - !5%) until you can throw something???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In case this isn't too late to be helpful: I've been reading about attempts to replicate ancient Egyptian paste (aka Egyptian faience) recipes. The earliest versions of Egyptian paste apparently didn't have any clay at all; it wasn't until the Roman period of Egyptian history that clay was added and the wheel was possibly used. (There has been debate about whether they actually used Egyptian paste on the wheel; to my knowledge this hasn't been decisively determined.) One text states the following: "Lab experiments have shown that a 10% calcareous clay addition will give sufficient plasticity for throwing, even when used by the relatively inexperienced." (Vandiver, 1998; this is discussed -- and the full reference is given -- in this article here.) I haven't tried it so I can't vouch for the accuracy of that statement. Good luck to the student trying this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×