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Castellscouple

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  1. Okay off to the mad-chem lab after reading up on crematorium sites first. Thanks to all who let me know. I planned on either placing the bones on an unglazed tile and/or not glazing the entire bone(s) I'll upload beautiful pics (I'm a photographer) if everything doesn't explode, melt, or incinerate. hehe EDIT/COPY: WIKI Contrary to popular belief, the cremated remains are not ashes in the usual sense. After the incineration is completed, the dry bone fragments are swept out of the retort and pulverized by a machine called a cremulator to process them into "ashes" or "cremated remains",[6] although pulverization may also be performed by hand. This leaves the bone with a fine sand like texture and color, able to be scattered without need for mixing with any foreign matter,[7] though the size of the grain varies depending on the cremulator used. Their weight is approximately 4 pounds (1.8 kg) for adult human females and 6 pounds (2.7 kg) for adult human males. There are various types of cremulators, including rotating devices, grinders, and older models using heavy metal balls.[8]
  2. I use to make bonelike objects with a porcelain and covered with terra sig, burnished fired to ^09-08. Or if you want the clay harder and fired hotter , you could wax the surface. This way you avoid dealing with bare clay spots and glaze. Marcia I'm not making bone-LIKE objects is all, I need information on using real bones and glazing them.
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  4. Hello all, I got referred here from a new acquaintance. As you can tell from the title I'll shortly be starting a fun little art project of glazing antlers, skulls, shells, and other bones. If anyone has a bit of info or a few links to toss my way, I'd greatly appreciate it. I'll be using an electric kiln and low cone glazes. I originally was going to slip the bones and bisque them before glazing but learned that bones don't incinerate so the shrinkage of the clay body would destroy itself around the bone. So, with that in mind I was brought to the direct glazing. Thanks for whatever you toss my way...unless it's a brick. That might hurt. Tyler
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