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o2jmpr

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About o2jmpr

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  1. Here is my fire pit at home. It's 2x2x2 interior and the bottom is dug deep, lined with gravel, then pea gravel, then about 4-5 inches of sand. Could I get away with just placing a saggar atop some wood coals and then building a big campfire on top and letting it burn down overnight instead of trying to build an elaborate bucket kiln and using charcoal briquettes?
  2. Would terra blanc clay be safe to make a clay tobacco pipe from? It's supposed to fire lower than earthenware and have grog which would help me pit fire these. Thank you
  3. It's been suggested to consider a rocket stove kiln vs charcoal burn down. Could I also get your thoughts on this as well as the saggar question? Thanks again everyone!
  4. I think 1100-1200 should be plenty hot. They don't need to vitrify. I want them to be as porous as possible, that way they smoke cool and accept the moisture and tars from the tobacco. They can be cleaned back to original state by refiring. I did not consider the can construction. THANK YOU! Ill have to see just how a paint can is put together. Maybe that's not an option. How do you feel about the venting issue?
  5. Hello all! I really need some help with understanding how to proceed. I'm new to this and don't have a kiln available in my city. I would like to fire some clay pipes in a homemade kiln using charcoal. I'm planning on getting a 6 gallon steel pail with a vent pipe at the bottom to two stacked paint cans inside, the middle space filled with volcanic rock for a grill and the paint cans filled with charcoal briquettes for firing. My main problem here is that although I'm "pit firing" or smoke firing, I want the pipes to stay clean and white so I'll require a saggar which I intended to make myself from the same clay as the pipes in a long narrow cylinder ( I'll fire this first of course and don't care if it takes on any colors) or sometimes using a smaller quart sized paint can as the saggar. 1. Will this work at all? 2. Should the saggar be vented since I'm firing greenware? I'll go from bone dry to preheating in my baking oven at 500 degrees before trying to fire, but I'm still worried about steam or off-gassing in a sealed saggar maybe causing them to explode. 3. Would you anticipate any other potential problems I may not have considered since I'm greenware myself :Dsrc="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.gif"> I really appreciate anyone's ability to help with these questions. Thanks very much!
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