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m.cassels

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About m.cassels

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday 10/13/1942

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Salta, Argentina
  • Interests
    Ceramics, rescue and breeding of Perro Pila Argentino, our native hairless dog breed, writing.
  1. Sustainability In The Studio

    I used a reverse draft, Australian design kiln with a drip burner and used crank case oil in the eighties. I got the oil from a service station that attended trucks bringing minerals down from San Antonio de los Cobres, in Salta, Argentina. This oil had a lot of very fine copper-containing dust in suspension, so my reduction firings often produced interesting red flashes on the pots. I also had to lie on my stomach to rake out the pebbles accreted from the dust. The roar of the kiln was almost deafening, and it billowed out black smoke which fortunately, there not being any close neighbours, was not reported to environmental authorities. Nowadays I use a natural gas kiln, often adding wood at the end of the firing. But gas provision in the pipeline varies from hour to hour, so firings that should normally take some 16-18 hours can stretch out to over 30. I also save up frying vegetable oil (not much, as I don't go in for fries and live on my own) which I drip in through the spyhole. But, while I love the effects of 'dirty' firing on my pots, I would be very happy indeed if someone were to come up with a cheap solar kiln, even for firing one small piece at a time, for perfectly clean porcelain firing. In this part of the world, we enjoy absolutely clear skies and intense sunlight all through August, September and October...
  2. December 2009 show

    Ceramics shown in ProCultura Salta, December 2009
  3. Monica Cassels ceramics

    Object presented at one-woman show in Salta, Argentina, December 2009
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