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Tree

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About Tree

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  1. Thanks for everyones input. The L&L is pricey. I am not hard on my kilns I expect it to last a very long time. I currently have a paragon that is over 15 years in excellent condition. So the L&L is a longterm investment which makes the price worth considering. Again thanks Terri
  2. Looking for pros and cons on the different brands of oval kilns offered. I am needing inside dimensions larger than 30". I want to go with cone 10. Anyone have any suggestions? Terri
  3. I found an article titled "Sculpture Bodies" discussing some of the materials someone might consider if working with large sculptures. It is written by a member of The Quartz Inverters. This is the University of Manitoba Ceramics Club also known as the Quartz Inverters. In all honesty I do not have a technical background. I am trying to learn more. The article was easy to understand and seemed to offer good suggestions. One of the things they discuss is the importance of grog. Grog reduces shrinkage and helps protect against cracking. They suggest that the best way to help a sculpture body dry evenly and not explode during the fire process is to add lots of grog. This opens up the body and allows moisture to escape from deep within. When walls are over 1" thick this very important. They recommend a formula for adding grog. It is as follows: "Industrial research has found that there is an ideal way to grade grog, no matter what percentage is added to the body. Of the total amount added, use: 50% Coarse grog, (4-16 mesh) 10% Medium grog (20-36 mesh) 40% Fine grog (40-60 mesh) So, if your clay body calls for 30% added grog, you would use 15% coarse, 3% medium, and 12% fine grog. This makes for ideal packing of the grog sizes in the clay." Here is the address if you are interested in the article. http://ltc.umanitoba...ulpture-bodies/ When I first wrote my article asking about fillers for clay I was wondering what percentages others were using and why they were using the percentage they chose. I was hoping to compare that ot the article and then decide what I want to do. I don't think I was very clear. Sorry about that. Hope the article is good information for others.
  4. Firing Pictures

    I don't know if this is what you are looking for but just in case check out the forum called Aesthetics, discussion New Factory first post encourages you to read an article from Ceramics Monthly. In the post Article is bold click on it and read the article. At the bottom of the article is a link that will take to someone who is working with digital images on clay than firing the work. Hope this is helpful.
  5. Crimes And Mythdemeanors

    That is nice to know. How did the myth get started?
  6. The filler I am speaking of is grog and Kyanite. Kyanite is useful in Raku. Most of my work is Raku. It helps with some of the thermal shock issues and helps reduce cracks in the clay. I do not throw on the wheel. My pieces are hand built. I begin with a solid mass and form my basic shape. At some point I have to hollow out the piece. In some areas of the sculpt, the walls are easily an inch thick. This is what helps support the overall shape. Even pieces that are only 24 inches tall need that thicker wall towards the bottom to provide the support. Compared to some large sculpts I have seen my work is probably not considered large. My largest sculpts have had areas that were 1and 1/2 inch thick possibly thicker. I fire very slow.
  7. My base clay is a cone 5/6 stoneware body. The last firing is Raku. With that in mind, when building a clay body for large sculptures that may have walls as thick as 1 and 1/2 inch, what percentage is considered a good percentage of filler? Why or why not? Thanks
  8. My base clay is a cone 5/6 stoneware body. The last firing is Raku. With that in mind, when building a clay body for large sculptures that may have walls as thick as 1 and 1/2 inch, what percentage is considered a good percentage of filler? Why or why not?

    Thanks

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