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Bruzbt

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About Bruzbt

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday 01/24/1947

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Portland Oregon
  • Interests
    clay, artistic and functional with some whimsy
  1. Kiln Lid not tightly closed?

    I have noticed the same thing on my year old Skutt, maybe less than 1/16", but when my eyes are at the same elevation as the joint I can see red. I assumed this is from a slight out of level of the top of the interior bricks. I haven't worried about it or the heat loss from it as Skutt recommends leaving the to plug out. You can try to find the high spot if you are concerned but in my opinion it is OK to run as is. Bruzbt
  2. Home made slab roller?

    I built a slab roller several years ago and it is still at work. I was lucky enough to have a friend who gave me 2 steel rollers from a printing process at his job. They become unusable to them when they develope micro grooves where the material passes over them. They are 20" long and 6 and 5 inches in diameter. I don't know the make of the roller I used as a guide in the design but it basically a top roller (larger)riding on the outside edges of the table frame. The actual table top is recessed with removable sheets of masonite to vary slab thickness. The smaller roller is under the table with 2 cables running from one end, around the smaller roller and then to the other end with turnbuckles to maintain tension. The bearings of both rollers mount to a common bracket. The lower roller has a 5 spoke device that is used to turn the roller. There are 4 skate board wheels that hold the top roller tight to the table. When the operator spins the spoked wheel the whole mechanism moves over the table and rolls out the slab between layers of light canvas. I can provide pictures and/or sketches if anyone has interest. Bruzbt
  3. I have used Hardiboard extensively around my studio, table tops, gas burner enclosure, etc. This stuff eats saw blades and drill bits for lunch. The best way I have found to cut it is to use a box cutter knife to score the surface and snap it over an edge of a table or similar. The is the same as with sheet rock. The blade will dull after a few cuts but they are relatively inexpensive. Hardiboard absorbs water quickly so make sure you can keep an eye on it so to keep the piece from extreme localized drying. Bruzbt
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